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Join the Chocolatey Team on our regular monthly stream where we discuss all things Community, what we do, how you can get involved and answer your Chocolatey questions.

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Announcing Chocolatey Central Management 0.10.0

Livestream from
Thursday, 06 October 2022

We recently released our largest update to Chocolatey Central Management so far. Join Gary and Steph to find out more about Chocolatey Central Management and the new features and fixes we've added to this release.

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Chocolatey and Intune Overview

Webinar Replay from
Wednesday, 30 March 2022

At Chocolatey Software we strive for simple, and teaching others. Let us teach you just how simple it could be to keep your 3rd party applications updated across your devices, all with Intune!

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Chocolatey For Business. In Azure. In One Click.

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Join James and Josh to show you how you can get the Chocolatey For Business recommended infrastructure and workflow, created, in Azure, in around 20 minutes.

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The Future of Chocolatey CLI

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Join Paul and Gary to hear more about the plans for the Chocolatey CLI in the not so distant future. We'll talk about some cool new features, long term asks from Customers and Community and how you can get involved!

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Hacktoberfest Tuesdays 2022

Livestreams from
October 2022

For Hacktoberfest, Chocolatey ran a livestream every Tuesday! Re-watch Cory, James, Gary, and Rain as they share knowledge on how to contribute to open-source projects such as Chocolatey CLI.

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Chocolatey Product Spotlight: Chocolatey 1.2.0 and Chocolatey Licensed Extension 5.0.0

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Join Paul and Gary for this months Chocolatey product livestream where we look at the latest release of Chocolatey 1.2.0, Chocolatey Licensed Extension 5.0.0 and shine a spotlight on the new hook scripts functionality. This opens up so many possibilities for Chocolatey CLI users!

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Chocolatey Coding Livestream

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Join Josh as he adds the ability to manage Chocolatey GUI config and features with the Chocolatey Ansible Collection.

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Introduction into Chocolatey with Veeam

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Tuesday, 13 December 2022

Join Gary, Paul, and Maurice as they introduce and demonstrate how to use Chocolatey! Questions will be answered live in an Ask Me Anything format.

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Downloads:

160,077

Downloads of v 0.9.398:

180

Last Update:

31 Aug 2018

Package Maintainer(s):

Software Author(s):

  • Chrissy LeMaire

Tags:

admin powershell module template dba sqlserver sql tools database

dbatools (PowerShell Module)

This is not the latest version of dbatools (PowerShell Module) available.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3

0.9.398 | Updated: 31 Aug 2018

Downloads:

160,077

Downloads of v 0.9.398:

180

Maintainer(s):

Software Author(s):

  • Chrissy LeMaire

dbatools (PowerShell Module) 0.9.398

This is not the latest version of dbatools (PowerShell Module) available.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3

Some Checks Have Failed or Are Not Yet Complete

Not All Tests Have Passed


Validation Testing Passed


Verification Testing Passed

Details

Scan Testing Resulted in Flagged:

This package was submitted (and approved) prior to automated virus scanning integration into the package moderation processs.

We recommend clicking the "Details" link to make your own decision on installing this package.

Details
Learn More

Deployment Method: Individual Install, Upgrade, & Uninstall

To install dbatools (PowerShell Module), run the following command from the command line or from PowerShell:

>

To upgrade dbatools (PowerShell Module), run the following command from the command line or from PowerShell:

>

To uninstall dbatools (PowerShell Module), run the following command from the command line or from PowerShell:

>

Deployment Method:

NOTE

This applies to both open source and commercial editions of Chocolatey.

1. Enter Your Internal Repository Url

(this should look similar to https://community.chocolatey.org/api/v2/)


2. Setup Your Environment

1. Ensure you are set for organizational deployment

Please see the organizational deployment guide

2. Get the package into your environment

  • Open Source or Commercial:
    • Proxy Repository - Create a proxy nuget repository on Nexus, Artifactory Pro, or a proxy Chocolatey repository on ProGet. Point your upstream to https://community.chocolatey.org/api/v2/. Packages cache on first access automatically. Make sure your choco clients are using your proxy repository as a source and NOT the default community repository. See source command for more information.
    • You can also just download the package and push it to a repository Download

3. Copy Your Script

choco upgrade dbatools -y --source="'INTERNAL REPO URL'" --version="'0.9.398'" [other options]

See options you can pass to upgrade.

See best practices for scripting.

Add this to a PowerShell script or use a Batch script with tools and in places where you are calling directly to Chocolatey. If you are integrating, keep in mind enhanced exit codes.

If you do use a PowerShell script, use the following to ensure bad exit codes are shown as failures:


choco upgrade dbatools -y --source="'INTERNAL REPO URL'" --version="'0.9.398'" 
$exitCode = $LASTEXITCODE

Write-Verbose "Exit code was $exitCode"
$validExitCodes = @(0, 1605, 1614, 1641, 3010)
if ($validExitCodes -contains $exitCode) {
  Exit 0
}

Exit $exitCode

- name: Install dbatools
  win_chocolatey:
    name: dbatools
    version: '0.9.398'
    source: INTERNAL REPO URL
    state: present

See docs at https://docs.ansible.com/ansible/latest/modules/win_chocolatey_module.html.


chocolatey_package 'dbatools' do
  action    :install
  source   'INTERNAL REPO URL'
  version  '0.9.398'
end

See docs at https://docs.chef.io/resource_chocolatey_package.html.


cChocoPackageInstaller dbatools
{
    Name     = "dbatools"
    Version  = "0.9.398"
    Source   = "INTERNAL REPO URL"
}

Requires cChoco DSC Resource. See docs at https://github.com/chocolatey/cChoco.


package { 'dbatools':
  ensure   => '0.9.398',
  provider => 'chocolatey',
  source   => 'INTERNAL REPO URL',
}

Requires Puppet Chocolatey Provider module. See docs at https://forge.puppet.com/puppetlabs/chocolatey.


4. If applicable - Chocolatey configuration/installation

See infrastructure management matrix for Chocolatey configuration elements and examples.

Package Approved

This package was approved as a trusted package on 31 Aug 2018.

Description

dbatools logo dbatools is sort of like a command-line SQL Server Management Studio. The project initially started out as Start-SqlMigration.ps1, but has now grown into a collection of over 300 commands that help automate SQL Server tasks and encourage best practices.

NOTE: This module requires a minimum of PowerShell v3.

NOTE: This is an automatically updated package. If you find it is out of date by more than a week, please contact the maintainer(s) and let them know the package is no longer updating correctly.


tools\.skipAutoUninstaller
 
tools\chocolateyBeforeModify.ps1
$ErrorActionPreference = 'Stop'

$moduleName = 'dbatools'      # this could be different from package name

$module = Get-Module -Name $moduleName
if ($module) {
    Write-Verbose "Module '$moduleName' is imported into the session. Removing it."
    Remove-Module -Name $moduleName -Force -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

    if ($lib = [appdomain]::CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies() | Where-Object FullName -like "dbatools, *") {
        Write-Verbose "Found locked DLL files for module '$moduleName'."
        $moduleDir = Split-Path $module.Path -Parent
        if ($lib.Location -like "$moduleDir\*") {
            Write-Warning @"
We have detected dbatools to be already imported from '$moduleDir' and the dll files have been locked and cannot be updated.
Please close all consoles that have dbatools imported (Remove-Module dbatools is NOT enough).
"@
            throw 
        }
    }
}
tools\chocolateyInstall.ps1
$ErrorActionPreference = 'Stop'

$toolsDir   = "$(Split-Path -parent $MyInvocation.MyCommand.Definition)"
$moduleName = 'dbatools'  # this may be different from the package name and different case

if ($PSVersionTable.PSVersion.Major -lt 3) {
    throw "$moduleName) module requires a minimum of PowerShell v3."
}

# module may already be installed outside of Chocolatey
Remove-Module -Name $moduleName -Force -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

$sourcePath = Join-Path -Path $toolsDir -ChildPath "$modulename\*"
$destPath   = Join-Path -Path $env:ProgramFiles -ChildPath "WindowsPowerShell\Modules\$moduleName"

if ($PSVersionTable.PSVersion.Major -ge 5)
{
    $manifestFile = Join-Path -Path $toolsDir -ChildPath "$moduleName\$moduleName.psd1"
    $manifest     = Test-ModuleManifest -Path $manifestFile -WarningAction Ignore -ErrorAction Stop
    $destPath     = Join-Path -Path $destPath -ChildPath $manifest.Version.ToString()
}

Write-Verbose "Creating destination directory '$destPath' for module."
New-Item -Path $destPath -ItemType Directory -Force -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | Out-Null

Write-Verbose "Moving '$moduleName' files from '$sourcePath' to '$destPath'."
Move-Item -Path $sourcePath -Destination $destPath -Force

if ($PSVersionTable.PSVersion.Major -lt 4)
{
    $modulePaths = [Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariable('PSModulePath', 'Machine') -split ';'
    if ($modulePaths -notcontains $destPath)
    {
        Write-Verbose "Adding '$destPath' to PSModulePath."
        $newModulePath = @($destPath, $modulePaths) -join ';'

        [Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable('PSModulePath', $newModulePath, 'Machine')
        $env:PSModulePath = $newModulePath
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\perfmontemplates\collectorsets.xml
<Objs Version="1.1.0.1" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/powershell/2004/04">
  <Obj RefId="0">
    <TN RefId="0">
      <T>Deserialized.System.Management.Automation.PSCustomObject</T>
      <T>Deserialized.System.Object</T>
    </TN>
    <MS>
      <S N="Name">Long Running Queries</S>
      <S N="Source">Brad McGehee</S>
    </MS>
  </Obj>
  <Obj RefId="1">
    <TNRef RefId="0" />
    <MS>
      <S N="Name">PAL - SQL Server 2005</S>
      <S N="Source">Clint Huffman</S>
    </MS>
  </Obj>
  <Obj RefId="2">
    <TNRef RefId="0" />
    <MS>
      <S N="Name">PAL - SQL Server 2008 and R2</S>
      <S N="Source">Clint Huffman</S>
    </MS>
  </Obj>
  <Obj RefId="3">
    <TNRef RefId="0" />
    <MS>
      <S N="Name">PAL - SQL Server 2012</S>
      <S N="Source">Clint Huffman</S>
    </MS>
  </Obj>
  <Obj RefId="4">
    <TNRef RefId="0" />
    <MS>
      <S N="Name">PAL - SQL Server 2014 and Up</S>
      <S N="Source">Clint Huffman</S>
    </MS>
  </Obj>
</Objs>
tools\dbatools\bin\LumenWorks.Framework.IO.dll
md5: 0A263CE4A3000CCC9233910FA81A0505 | sha1: 9DC0FECF034A40787EC087FCEE48F168C90631CC | sha256: B7F1F2EAF736A7AB0299D03E58DE52CED0E9EAA6731E21D5587E85C1829825A6 | sha512: 16D4B169CF832BC6C6603E61278B0BF320E2D800460A3AE8D13C9BE26A381038AB9617B1A82988749A2880518944DCB19166E46F864A081D20853FE9D0275533
tools\dbatools\bin\library.ps1
# Current library Version the module expects
$currentLibraryVersion = New-Object System.Version(0, 10, 0, 57)

<#
Library Versioning 101:
The version consists of 4 segments: Major, Minor, Build, Revision

Major: Should always be equal to the main version number of the dbatools PowerShell project.
Minor: Tracks major features within a major release. Increment on new features or significant structural changes. Reset to 0 when incrementing the major version.
Build: Tracks lesser functionality upgrades. Increment on all minor upgrades, reset to 0 when introducing a new major feature or major version.
Revision: Tracks all changes. Every single update to the library - bugfix, feature or redesign - increments the revision counter. It is never reset to 0.

Updating the library version number:
When changing the library version number, it is necessary to do so in TWO places:
- At the top of this very library.ps1
- Within AssemblyInfo.cs
These two locations MUST have matching version numbers, otherwise it will keep building the library and complaining about version mismatch!
#>

<#
#---------------------------------#
# Runtime configuration variables #
#---------------------------------#

The library recognizes a few external variables in order to customize its behavior on import.

$dbatools_strictsecuritymode
Setting this to $true will cause dbatools to always load the library directly from the module directory.
This is more secure, but less convenient when it comes to updating the module, as all consoles using it must be closed.

$dbatools_alwaysbuildlibrary
Setting this to $true will cause the module to always build the library from source, rather than reuse the binaries.
Mostly for developers working on the library.

#>

#region Test whether the module had already been imported
if (([System.Management.Automation.PSTypeName]'Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Configuration.Config').Type) {
    # No need to load the library again, if the module was once already imported.
    Write-Verbose -Message "Library already loaded, will not load again"
    $ImportLibrary = $false
}
else {
    Write-Verbose -Message "Library not present already, will import"
    $ImportLibrary = $true
}
#endregion Test whether the module had already been imported

if ($ImportLibrary) {
    #region Add Code
    try {
        $libraryBase = $ExecutionContext.SessionState.Module.ModuleBase + "\bin"
        # In strict security mode, only load from the already pre-compiled binary within the module
        if ($script:strictSecurityMode) {
            if (Test-Path -Path "$libraryBase\dbatools.dll") {
                Add-Type -Path "$libraryBase\dbatools.dll" -ErrorAction Stop
            }
            else {
                throw "Library not found, terminating!"
            }
        }
        # Else we prioritize user convenience
        else {
            $hasProject = Test-Path -Path "$libraryBase\projects\dbatools\dbatools.sln"
            $hasCompiledDll = Test-Path -Path "$libraryBase\dbatools.dll"

            if ((-not $script:alwaysBuildLibrary) -and $hasCompiledDll -and ([System.Diagnostics.FileVersionInfo]::GetVersionInfo("$libraryBase\dbatools.dll").FileVersion -eq $currentLibraryVersion)) {
                $start = Get-Date
                try {
                    Write-Verbose -Message "Found library, trying to copy & import"
                    if ($libraryBase -ne $script:DllRoot) { Copy-Item -Path "$libraryBase\dbatools.dll" -Destination $script:DllRoot -Force -ErrorAction Stop }
                    Add-Type -Path "$script:DllRoot\dbatools.dll" -ErrorAction Stop
                }
                catch {
                    Write-Verbose -Message "Failed to copy&import, attempting to import straight from the module directory"
                    Add-Type -Path "$libraryBase\dbatools.dll" -ErrorAction Stop
                }
                Write-Verbose -Message "Total duration: $((Get-Date) - $start)"
            }
            elseif ($hasProject) {
                "$($PSScriptRoot)\build-project.ps1"
            }
            else {
                throw "No valid dbatools library found! Check your module integrity"
            }
        }

        #region PowerShell TypeData
        Update-TypeData -TypeName "Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.dbaSystem.DbatoolsException" -SerializationDepth 2 -ErrorAction Ignore
        Update-TypeData -TypeName "Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.dbaSystem.DbatoolsExceptionRecord" -SerializationDepth 2 -ErrorAction Ignore
        #endregion PowerShell TypeData
    }
    catch {
        #region Warning
        Write-Warning @'
Dear User,

in the name of the dbatools team I apologize for the inconvenience.
Generally, when something goes wrong we try to handle and interpret in an
understandable manner. Unfortunately, something went awry with importing
our main library, so all the systems making this possible would not be initialized
yet. We have taken great pains to avoid this issue but this notification indicates
we have failed.

Please, in order to help us prevent this from happening again, visit us at:
https://github.com/sqlcollaborative/dbatools/issues
and tell us about this failure. All information will be appreciated, but
especially valuable are:
- Exports of the exception: $Error | Export-Clixml error.xml -Depth 4
- Screenshots
- Environment information (Operating System, Hardware Stats, .NET Version,
  PowerShell Version and whatever else you may consider of potential impact.)

Again, I apologize for the inconvenience and hope we will be able to speedily
resolve the issue.

Best Regards,
Friedrich Weinmann
aka "The guy who made most of The Library that Failed to import"

'@
        throw
        #endregion Warning
    }
    #endregion Add Code
}

#region Version Warning
if ($currentLibraryVersion -ne ([version](([AppDomain]::CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies() | Where-Object ManifestModule -like "dbatools.dll").CustomAttributes | Where-Object AttributeType -like "System.Reflection.AssemblyFileVersionAttribute").ConstructorArguments.Value)) {
    Write-Warning @"
A version missmatch between the dbatools library loaded and the one expected by
this module. This usually happens when you update the dbatools module and use
Remove-Module / Import-Module in order to load the latest version without
starting a new PowerShell instance.

Please restart the console to apply the library update, or unexpected behavior will likely occur.

If the issues continue to persist, please Remove-Item '$script:PSModuleRoot\bin\dbatools.dll'
"@
}
#endregion Version Warning
tools\dbatools\bin\perfmontemplates\collectorsets\PAL - SQL Server 2008 and R2.xml
<DataCollectorSet>
<Name>PAL - SQL Server 2008 and R2</Name>
<DisplayName>PAL - SQL Server 2008 and R2</DisplayName>
<DisplayNameUnresolved>PAL - SQL Server 2008 and R2</DisplayNameUnresolved>
<Description>Data Collector Sets from PAL, a performance monitor data aggregation tool by Microsoft. The toolset was created by Microsoft PFE Clint Huffman who worked with fellow experts to create a list specialized lists of counters. You can find the project at github.com/clinthuffman/PAL</Description>
<DescriptionUnresolved>Data Collector Sets from PAL, a performance monitor data aggregation tool by Microsoft. The toolset was created by Microsoft PFE Clint Huffman who worked with fellow experts to create a list specialized lists of counters. You can find the project at github.com/clinthuffman/PAL</DescriptionUnresolved>
<SubdirectoryFormat>3</SubdirectoryFormat>
<SubdirectoryFormatPattern>yyyyMMdd\-NNNNNN</SubdirectoryFormatPattern>
<PerformanceCounterDataCollector>
    <Name>PAL - SQL Server 2008 and R2 Collector</Name>
    <SampleInterval>15</SampleInterval>
    <Counter>\Cache\Dirty Pages</Counter>
    <Counter>\Cache\Lazy Write Flushes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\% Free Space</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\% Idle Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk Bytes/Read</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk Bytes/Transfer</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk Bytes/Write</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk sec/Read</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk sec/Transfer</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk sec/Write</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Current Disk Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Disk Bytes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Disk Reads/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Disk Transfers/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Disk Writes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Free Megabytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\% Committed Bytes In Use</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Available MBytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Commit Limit</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Committed Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Free &amp; Zero Page List Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Free System Page Table Entries</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Long-Term Average Standby Cache Lifetime (s)</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pages Input/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pages Output/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pages/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pool Nonpaged Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pool Paged Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pool Paged Resident Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\System Cache Resident Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Transition Pages RePurposed/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\MSRS 2008 R2 Web Service\Cache Misses/Sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\MSRS 2008 R2 Web Service\Report Requests</Counter>
    <Counter>\MSRS 2008 R2 Web Service\Total Memory Cache Misses</Counter>
    <Counter>\MSRS 2008 R2 Web Service\Total Requests</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Inspection System\Average inspection latency (sec/bytes)</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Bytes Received/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Bytes Sent/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Bytes Total/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Current Bandwidth</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Output Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Packets Outbound Errors</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Packets Received/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Packets Sent/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Packets/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Paging File(*)\% Usage</Counter>
    <Counter>\PhysicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\PhysicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk sec/Read</Counter>
    <Counter>\PhysicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk sec/Write</Counter>
    <Counter>\PhysicalDisk(*)\Current Disk Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\PhysicalDisk(*)\Disk Bytes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\Handle Count</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\ID Process</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\IO Data Operations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\IO Other Operations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\IO Read Operations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\IO Write Operations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\Private Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\Thread Count</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\Virtual Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\Working Set</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(sqlservr)\% Privileged Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(sqlservr)\% Processor Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% DPC Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% Interrupt Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% of Maximum Frequency</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% Privileged Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% Processor Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% User Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\DPC Rate</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\Parking Status</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\% DPC Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\% Interrupt Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\% Privileged Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\% Processor Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\% User Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\DPC Rate</Counter>
    <Counter>\ReportServer:Service\Errors Total</Counter>
    <Counter>\ReportServer:Service\Errors/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\ReportServer:Service\Memory Pressure State</Counter>
    <Counter>\ReportServer:Service\Memory Shrink Amount</Counter>
    <Counter>\ReportServer:Service\Memory Shrink Notifications/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Server\Pool Nonpaged Failures</Counter>
    <Counter>\Server\Pool Paged Failures</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:Jobs\Active jobs</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:Jobs\Failed jobs</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:Jobs\Job success rate</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:Jobs\Successful jobs</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:JobSteps\Active steps</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:JobSteps\Total step retries</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Forwarded Records/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\FreeSpace Scans/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Full Scans/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Index Searches/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Page Splits/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Scan Point Revalidations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Table Lock Escalations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Workfiles Created/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Worktables Created/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Worktables From Cache Ratio</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Buffer cache hit ratio</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Checkpoint pages/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Free list stalls/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Free pages</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Lazy writes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Page life expectancy</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Page lookups/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Page reads/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Page writes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Readahead pages/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Stolen pages</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Node(*)\Foreign pages</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Node(*)\Page life expectancy</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Data File(s) Size (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Bytes Flushed/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log File(s) Size (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log File(s) Used Size (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Flush Wait Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Flush Waits/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Flushes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Growths</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Shrinks</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Truncations</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Percent Log Used</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Deprecated Features(*)\Usage</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:General Statistics\Logins/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:General Statistics\Logouts/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:General Statistics\User Connections</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Latches\Latch Waits/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Latches\Total Latch Wait Time (ms)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Average Wait Time (ms)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Lock Requests/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Lock Timeouts/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Lock Wait Time (ms)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Lock Waits/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Number of Deadlocks/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Granted Workspace Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Maximum Workspace Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Memory Grants Outstanding</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Memory Grants Pending</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Target Server Memory(KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Total Server Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Plan Cache(*)\Cache Hit Ratio</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Resource Pool Stats(*)\CPU usage %</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Resource Pool Stats(*)\Max memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Resource Pool Stats(*)\Target memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Resource Pool Stats(*)\Used memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Errors(*)\Errors/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\Auto-Param Attempts/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\Batch Requests/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\Failed Auto-Params/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\Safe Auto-Params/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\SQL Attention rate</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\SQL Compilations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\SQL Re-Compilations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\Unsafe Auto-Params/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SSIS Pipeline 10.0\Buffer memory</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SSIS Pipeline 10.0\Buffers in use</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SSIS Pipeline 10.0\Buffers spooled</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SSIS Pipeline 10.0\Flat buffers in use</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SSIS Pipeline 10.0\Private buffers in use</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Free Space in tempdb (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Longest Transaction Running Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\NonSnapshot Version Transactions</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Snapshot Transactions</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Version Cleanup rate (KB/s)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Version Generation rate (KB/s)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\CPU usage %</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\Queued requests</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\Requests completed/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\System\Context Switches/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\System\Processor Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\System\System Calls/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\TCPv4\Connection Failures</Counter>
</PerformanceCounterDataCollector>
</DataCollectorSet>
tools\dbatools\bin\perfmontemplates\collectorsets\PAL - SQL Server 2012.xml
<DataCollectorSet>
<Name>PAL - SQL Server 2012</Name>
<DisplayName>PAL - SQL Server 2012</DisplayName>
<DisplayNameUnresolved>PAL - SQL Server 2012</DisplayNameUnresolved>
<Description>Data Collector Sets from PAL, a performance monitor data aggregation tool by Microsoft. The toolset was created by Microsoft PFE Clint Huffman who worked with fellow experts to create a list specialized lists of counters. You can find the project at github.com/clinthuffman/PAL</Description>
<DescriptionUnresolved>Data Collector Sets from PAL, a performance monitor data aggregation tool by Microsoft. The toolset was created by Microsoft PFE Clint Huffman who worked with fellow experts to create a list specialized lists of counters. You can find the project at github.com/clinthuffman/PAL</DescriptionUnresolved>
<SubdirectoryFormat>3</SubdirectoryFormat>
<SubdirectoryFormatPattern>yyyyMMdd\-NNNNNN</SubdirectoryFormatPattern>
<PerformanceCounterDataCollector>
    <Name>PAL - SQL Server 2012 Collector</Name>
    <SampleInterval>15</SampleInterval>
    <Counter>\Cache\Dirty Pages</Counter>
    <Counter>\Cache\Lazy Write Flushes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\% Free Space</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\% Idle Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk Bytes/Read</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk Bytes/Transfer</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk Bytes/Write</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk sec/Read</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk sec/Transfer</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk sec/Write</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Current Disk Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Disk Bytes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Disk Reads/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Disk Transfers/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Disk Writes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Free Megabytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\% Committed Bytes In Use</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Available MBytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Commit Limit</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Committed Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Free &amp; Zero Page List Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Free System Page Table Entries</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Long-Term Average Standby Cache Lifetime (s)</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pages Input/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pages Output/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pages/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pool Nonpaged Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pool Paged Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pool Paged Resident Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\System Cache Resident Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Transition Pages RePurposed/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\MSRS 2011 Web Service\Cache Misses/Sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\MSRS 2011 Web Service\Report Requests</Counter>
    <Counter>\MSRS 2011 Web Service\Total Memory Cache Misses</Counter>
    <Counter>\MSRS 2011 Web Service\Total Requests</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Inspection System\Average inspection latency (sec/bytes)</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Bytes Received/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Bytes Sent/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Bytes Total/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Current Bandwidth</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Output Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Packets Outbound Errors</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Packets Received/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Packets Sent/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Packets/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Paging File(*)\% Usage</Counter>
    <Counter>\PhysicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\PhysicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk sec/Read</Counter>
    <Counter>\PhysicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk sec/Write</Counter>
    <Counter>\PhysicalDisk(*)\Current Disk Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\PhysicalDisk(*)\Disk Bytes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\Handle Count</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\ID Process</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\IO Data Operations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\IO Other Operations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\IO Read Operations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\IO Write Operations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\Private Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\Thread Count</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\Virtual Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\Working Set</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(sqlservr)\% Privileged Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(sqlservr)\% Processor Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% DPC Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% Interrupt Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% of Maximum Frequency</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% Privileged Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% Processor Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% User Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\DPC Rate</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\Parking Status</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\% DPC Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\% Interrupt Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\% Privileged Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\% Processor Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\% User Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\DPC Rate</Counter>
    <Counter>\ReportServer:Service\Errors Total</Counter>
    <Counter>\ReportServer:Service\Errors/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\ReportServer:Service\Memory Pressure State</Counter>
    <Counter>\ReportServer:Service\Memory Shrink Amount</Counter>
    <Counter>\ReportServer:Service\Memory Shrink Notifications/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Server\Pool Nonpaged Failures</Counter>
    <Counter>\Server\Pool Paged Failures</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:Jobs\Active jobs</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:Jobs\Failed jobs</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:Jobs\Job success rate</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:Jobs\Successful jobs</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:JobSteps\Active steps</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:JobSteps\Total step retries</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Forwarded Records/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\FreeSpace Scans/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Full Scans/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Index Searches/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Page Splits/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Scan Point Revalidations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Table Lock Escalations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Workfiles Created/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Worktables Created/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Worktables From Cache Ratio</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Availability Replica(*)\Bytes Received from Replica/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Availability Replica(*)\Bytes Sent to Replica/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Availability Replica(*)\Bytes Sent to Transport/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Availability Replica(_Total)\Receives from Replica/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Availability Replica(_Total)\Resent Messages/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Availability Replica(_Total)\Sends to Replica/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Background writer pages/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Buffer cache hit ratio</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Checkpoint pages/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Free list stalls/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Free pages</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Lazy writes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Page life expectancy</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Page lookups/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Page reads/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Page writes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Readahead pages/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Target pages</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Node(*)\Database pages</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Node(*)\Foreign pages</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Node(*)\Local node page lookups/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Node(*)\Page life expectancy</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Node(*)\Remote node page lookups/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(*)\Log Bytes Received/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(*)\Mirrored Write Transactions/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(*)\Recovery Queue</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(_Total)\Log remaining for undo</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(_Total)\Log Send Queue</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(_Total)\Redo blocked/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(_Total)\Redo Bytes Remaining</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(_Total)\Redone Bytes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(_Total)\Total Log requiring undo</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(_Total)\Transaction Delay</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Active Transactions</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Backup/Restore Throughput/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Bulk Copy Throughput/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Data File(s) Size (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Bytes Flushed/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log File(s) Size (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log File(s) Used Size (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Flush Wait Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Flush Waits/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Flushes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Growths</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Shrinks</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Truncations</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Percent Log Used</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Deprecated Features(*)\Usage</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:General Statistics\Active Temp Tables</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:General Statistics\Logins/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:General Statistics\Logouts/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:General Statistics\Temp Tables Creation Rate</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:General Statistics\Temp Tables For Destruction</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:General Statistics\User Connections</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Latches\Latch Waits/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Latches\Total Latch Wait Time (ms)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Average Wait Time (ms)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Lock Requests/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Lock Timeouts/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Lock Wait Time (ms)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Lock Waits/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Number of Deadlocks/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Granted Workspace Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Maximum Workspace Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Memory Grants Outstanding</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Memory Grants Pending</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Optimizer Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Stolen Server Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Target Server Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Target Server Memory(KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Total Server Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Node(*)\Database Node Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Node(*)\Foreign Node Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Node(*)\Stolen Node Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Node(*)\Target Node Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Node(000)\Total Node Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Plan Cache(*)\Cache Hit Ratio</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Resource Pool Stats(*)\CPU usage %</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Resource Pool Stats(*)\Max memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Resource Pool Stats(*)\Target memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Resource Pool Stats(*)\Used memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Errors(*)\Errors/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\Auto-Param Attempts/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\Batch Requests/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\Failed Auto-Params/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\Safe Auto-Params/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\SQL Attention rate</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\SQL Compilations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\SQL Re-Compilations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\Unsafe Auto-Params/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Free Space in tempdb (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Longest Transaction Running Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\NonSnapshot Version Transactions</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Snapshot Transactions</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Transactions</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Version Cleanup rate (KB/s)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Version Generation rate (KB/s)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Version Store Size (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:User Settable(*)\Query</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\Active parallel threads</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\Active requests</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\CPU usage %</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\Queued requests</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\Reduced memory grants/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\Requests completed/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\Suboptimal plans/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\System\Context Switches/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\System\Processor Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\System\System Calls/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\TCPv4\Connection Failures</Counter>
</PerformanceCounterDataCollector>
</DataCollectorSet>
tools\dbatools\bin\perfmontemplates\collectorsets\PAL - SQL Server 2014 and Up.xml
<DataCollectorSet>
<Name>PAL - SQL Server 2014 and Up</Name>
<DisplayName>PAL - SQL Server 2014 and Up</DisplayName>
<DisplayNameUnresolved>PAL - SQL Server 2014 and Up</DisplayNameUnresolved>
<Description>Data Collector Sets from PAL, a performance monitor data aggregation tool by Microsoft. The toolset was created by Microsoft PFE Clint Huffman who worked with fellow experts to create a list specialized lists of counters. You can find the project at github.com/clinthuffman/PAL</Description>
<DescriptionUnresolved>Data Collector Sets from PAL, a performance monitor data aggregation tool by Microsoft. The toolset was created by Microsoft PFE Clint Huffman who worked with fellow experts to create a list specialized lists of counters. You can find the project at github.com/clinthuffman/PAL</DescriptionUnresolved>
<SubdirectoryFormat>3</SubdirectoryFormat>
<SubdirectoryFormatPattern>yyyyMMdd\-NNNNNN</SubdirectoryFormatPattern>
<PerformanceCounterDataCollector>
    <Name>PAL - SQL Server 2014 and Up Collector</Name>
    <SampleInterval>15</SampleInterval>
    <Counter>\Cache\Dirty Pages</Counter>
    <Counter>\Cache\Lazy Write Flushes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\% Free Space</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\% Idle Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk Bytes/Read</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk Bytes/Transfer</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk Bytes/Write</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk sec/Read</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk sec/Transfer</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk sec/Write</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Current Disk Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Disk Bytes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Disk Reads/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Disk Transfers/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Disk Writes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\LogicalDisk(*)\Free Megabytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\% Committed Bytes In Use</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Available MBytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Commit Limit</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Committed Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Free &amp; Zero Page List Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Free System Page Table Entries</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Long-Term Average Standby Cache Lifetime (s)</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pages Input/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pages Output/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pages/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pool Nonpaged Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pool Paged Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Pool Paged Resident Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\System Cache Resident Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Memory\Transition Pages RePurposed/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\MSRS 2011 Web Service\Cache Misses/Sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\MSRS 2011 Web Service\Report Requests</Counter>
    <Counter>\MSRS 2011 Web Service\Total Memory Cache Misses</Counter>
    <Counter>\MSRS 2011 Web Service\Total Requests</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Inspection System\Average inspection latency (sec/bytes)</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Bytes Received/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Bytes Sent/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Bytes Total/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Current Bandwidth</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Output Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Packets Outbound Errors</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Packets Received/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Packets Sent/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Network Interface(*)\Packets/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Paging File(*)\% Usage</Counter>
    <Counter>\PhysicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\PhysicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk sec/Read</Counter>
    <Counter>\PhysicalDisk(*)\Avg. Disk sec/Write</Counter>
    <Counter>\PhysicalDisk(*)\Current Disk Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\PhysicalDisk(*)\Disk Bytes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\Handle Count</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\ID Process</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\IO Data Operations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\IO Other Operations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\IO Read Operations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\IO Write Operations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\Private Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\Thread Count</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\Virtual Bytes</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(*)\Working Set</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(sqlservr)\% Privileged Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Process(sqlservr)\% Processor Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% DPC Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% Interrupt Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% of Maximum Frequency</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% Privileged Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% Processor Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\% User Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\DPC Rate</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor Information(*)\Parking Status</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\% DPC Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\% Interrupt Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\% Privileged Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\% Processor Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\% User Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\Processor(*)\DPC Rate</Counter>
    <Counter>\ReportServer:Service\Errors Total</Counter>
    <Counter>\ReportServer:Service\Errors/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\ReportServer:Service\Memory Pressure State</Counter>
    <Counter>\ReportServer:Service\Memory Shrink Amount</Counter>
    <Counter>\ReportServer:Service\Memory Shrink Notifications/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\Server\Pool Nonpaged Failures</Counter>
    <Counter>\Server\Pool Paged Failures</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:Jobs\Active jobs</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:Jobs\Failed jobs</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:Jobs\Job success rate</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:Jobs\Successful jobs</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:JobSteps\Active steps</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLAgent:JobSteps\Total step retries</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Forwarded Records/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\FreeSpace Scans/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Full Scans/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Index Searches/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Page Splits/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Scan Point Revalidations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Table Lock Escalations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Workfiles Created/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Worktables Created/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Access Methods\Worktables From Cache Ratio</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Availability Replica(*)\Bytes Received from Replica/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Availability Replica(*)\Bytes Sent to Replica/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Availability Replica(*)\Bytes Sent to Transport/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Availability Replica(_Total)\Receives from Replica/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Availability Replica(_Total)\Resent Messages/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Availability Replica(_Total)\Sends to Replica/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager(*)\Extension page unreferenced time</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Background writer pages/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Buffer cache hit ratio</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Checkpoint pages/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Extension free pages</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Extension outstanding IO counter</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Free list stalls/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Free pages</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Lazy writes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Page life expectancy</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Page lookups/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Page reads/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Page writes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Readahead pages/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Manager\Target pages</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Node(*)\Database pages</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Node(*)\Foreign pages</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Node(*)\Local node page lookups/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Node(*)\Page life expectancy</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Buffer Node(*)\Remote node page lookups/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(*)\Log Bytes Received/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(*)\Mirrored Write Transactions/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(*)\Recovery Queue</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(_Total)\Log remaining for undo</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(_Total)\Log Send Queue</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(_Total)\Redo blocked/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(_Total)\Redo Bytes Remaining</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(_Total)\Redone Bytes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(_Total)\Total Log requiring undo</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Database Replica(_Total)\Transaction Delay</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Active Transactions</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Backup/Restore Throughput/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Bulk Copy Throughput/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Data File(s) Size (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Bytes Flushed/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log File(s) Size (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log File(s) Used Size (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Flush Wait Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Flush Waits/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Flushes/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Growths</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Shrinks</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Log Truncations</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Databases(*)\Percent Log Used</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Deprecated Features(*)\Usage</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:General Statistics\Active Temp Tables</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:General Statistics\Logins/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:General Statistics\Logouts/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:General Statistics\Temp Tables Creation Rate</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:General Statistics\Temp Tables For Destruction</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:General Statistics\User Connections</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Latches\Latch Waits/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Latches\Total Latch Wait Time (ms)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Average Wait Time (ms)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Lock Requests/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Lock Timeouts/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Lock Wait Time (ms)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Lock Waits/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Locks(*)\Number of Deadlocks/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Granted Workspace Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Maximum Workspace Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Memory Grants Outstanding</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Memory Grants Pending</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Optimizer Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Stolen Server Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Target Server Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Target Server Memory(KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Manager\Total Server Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Node(*)\Database Node Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Node(*)\Foreign Node Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Node(*)\Stolen Node Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Node(*)\Target Node Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Memory Node(000)\Total Node Memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Plan Cache(*)\Cache Hit Ratio</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Resource Pool Stats(*)\CPU usage %</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Resource Pool Stats(*)\Max memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Resource Pool Stats(*)\Target memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Resource Pool Stats(*)\Used memory (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Errors(*)\Errors/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\Auto-Param Attempts/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\Batch Requests/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\Failed Auto-Params/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\Safe Auto-Params/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\SQL Attention rate</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\SQL Compilations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\SQL Re-Compilations/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:SQL Statistics\Unsafe Auto-Params/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Free Space in tempdb (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Longest Transaction Running Time</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\NonSnapshot Version Transactions</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Snapshot Transactions</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Transactions</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Version Cleanup rate (KB/s)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Version Generation rate (KB/s)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Transactions\Version Store Size (KB)</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:User Settable(*)\Query</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\Active parallel threads</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\Active requests</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\CPU usage %</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\Queued requests</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\Reduced memory grants/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\Requests completed/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\SQLServer:Workload Group Stats(*)\Suboptimal plans/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\System\Context Switches/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\System\Processor Queue Length</Counter>
    <Counter>\System\System Calls/sec</Counter>
    <Counter>\TCPv4\Connection Failures</Counter>
</PerformanceCounterDataCollector>
</DataCollectorSet>
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools.sln
 
tools\dbatools\bin\diagnosticquery\SQLServerDiagnosticQueries_AzureSQLDatabase_201807.sql

-- Azure SQL Database Diagnostic Information Queries
-- Glenn Berry 
-- Last Modified: July 26, 2018
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/
-- http://sqlserverperformance.wordpress.com/
-- Twitter: GlennAlanBerry

-- Please listen to my Pluralsight courses
-- https://www.pluralsight.com/author/glenn-berry

-- If you want to find all of our SQLskills SQL101 blog posts, check out https://www.sqlskills.com/help/sql101/



--******************************************************************************
--*   Copyright (C) 2018 Glenn Berry, SQLskills.com
--*   All rights reserved. 
--*
--*   For more scripts and sample code, check out 
--*      https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn
--*
--*   You may alter this code for your own *non-commercial* purposes. You may
--*   republish altered code as long as you include this copyright and give due credit. 
--*
--*
--*   THIS CODE AND INFORMATION ARE PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF 
--*   ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED 
--*   TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND/OR FITNESS FOR A
--*   PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
--*
--******************************************************************************

-- Make sure you are connected a user database, rather than the master system database


-- Server level queries *******************************

-- SQL and OS Version information for current instance  (Query 1) (Version Info)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], @@VERSION AS [SQL Server and OS Version Info];
------

-- Azure SQL Database does not expose as much information as on-premise SQL Server does
													


-- Get instance-level configuration values for instance  (Query 2) (Configuration Values)
SELECT name, value, value_in_use, minimum, maximum, [description], is_dynamic, is_advanced
FROM sys.configurations WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- All of these settings are read-only in Azure SQL Database, so they are informational only



-- SQL Server NUMA Node information  (Query 3) (SQL Server NUMA Info)
SELECT node_id, node_state_desc, memory_node_id, processor_group, cpu_count, online_scheduler_count, 
       idle_scheduler_count, active_worker_count, avg_load_balance, resource_monitor_state
FROM sys.dm_os_nodes WITH (NOLOCK) 
WHERE node_state_desc <> N'ONLINE DAC' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some useful information about the composition and relative load on your NUMA nodes
-- You want to see an equal number of schedulers on each NUMA node



-- Calculates average stalls per read, per write, and per total input/output for each database file  (Query 4) (IO Stalls by File)
SELECT DB_NAME(fs.database_id) AS [Database Name], CAST(fs.io_stall_read_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_read_stall_ms],
CAST(fs.io_stall_write_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_write_stall_ms],
CAST((fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms)/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_io_stall_ms],
fs.io_stall_read_ms, fs.num_of_reads, 
fs.io_stall_write_ms, fs.num_of_writes, fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms AS [io_stalls], fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes AS [total_io],
io_stall_queued_read_ms AS [Resource Governor Total Read IO Latency (ms)], io_stall_queued_write_ms AS [Resource Governor Total Write IO Latency (ms)]
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(null,null) AS fs
ORDER BY avg_io_stall_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database files on the entire instance have the most I/O bottlenecks
-- This can help you decide whether certain LUNs are overloaded and whether you might
-- want to move some files to a different location or perhaps improve your I/O performance
-- These latency numbers include all file activity against each SQL Server 
-- database file since SQL Server was last started



-- Get I/O utilization by database (Query 5) (IO Usage By Database)
WITH Aggregate_IO_Statistics
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(SUM(num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/1048576 AS DECIMAL(12, 2)) AS io_in_mb
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS [DM_IO_STATS]
WHERE database_id NOT IN (4, 5, 32767)
GROUP BY database_id)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY io_in_mb DESC) AS [I/O Rank], [Database Name], 
      CAST(io_in_mb/ SUM(io_in_mb) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [I/O Percent],
      io_in_mb AS [Total I/O (MB)]     
FROM Aggregate_IO_Statistics
ORDER BY [I/O Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database is using the most I/O resources on the instance


-- Get total buffer usage by database for current instance  (Query 6) (Total Buffer Usage by Database)
-- This make take some time to run on a busy instance
WITH AggregateBufferPoolUsage
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name], COUNT(page_id) AS [Page Count],
CAST(COUNT(*) * 8/1024.0 AS DECIMAL (10,2))  AS [CachedSize],
AVG(read_microsec) AS [Avg Read Time (microseconds)]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE database_id NOT IN (4, 5, 32767)
GROUP BY DB_NAME(database_id))
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY CachedSize DESC) AS [Buffer Pool Rank], [Database Name], 
       CAST(CachedSize / SUM(CachedSize) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [Buffer Pool Percent],
       [Page Count], CachedSize AS [Cached Size (MB)], [Avg Read Time (microseconds)]
FROM AggregateBufferPoolUsage
ORDER BY [Buffer Pool Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you how much memory (in the buffer pool) 
-- is being used by each database on the instance



-- Get a count of SQL connections by IP address (Query 7) (Connection Counts by IP Address)    
SELECT ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name, 
COUNT(ec.session_id) AS [connection count] 
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions AS es WITH (NOLOCK) 
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_connections AS ec WITH (NOLOCK) 
ON es.session_id = ec.session_id 
GROUP BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name  
ORDER BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you figure where your database load is coming from
-- and verifies connectivity from other machines

-- Solving Connectivity errors to SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2EgzoD0



-- Get Average Task Counts (run multiple times)  (Query 8) (Avg Task Counts)
SELECT AVG(current_tasks_count) AS [Avg Task Count], 
AVG(work_queue_count) AS [Avg Work Queue Count],
AVG(runnable_tasks_count) AS [Avg Runnable Task Count],
AVG(pending_disk_io_count) AS [Avg Pending DiskIO Count]
FROM sys.dm_os_schedulers WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE scheduler_id < 255 OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Sustained values above 10 suggest further investigation in that area (depending on your Service Tier)
-- Avg Task Counts will be higher with lower service tiers
-- High Avg Task Counts are often caused by blocking/deadlocking or other resource contention

-- Sustained values above 1 suggest further investigation in that area
-- High Avg Runnable Task Counts are a good sign of CPU pressure
-- High Avg Pending DiskIO Counts are a sign of disk pressure



-- Detect blocking (run multiple times)  (Query 9) (Detect Blocking)						
SELECT t1.resource_type AS [lock type], DB_NAME(resource_database_id) AS [database],
t1.resource_associated_entity_id AS [blk object],t1.request_mode AS [lock req],  -- lock requested
t1.request_session_id AS [waiter sid], t2.wait_duration_ms AS [wait time],       -- spid of waiter  
(SELECT [text] FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r WITH (NOLOCK)                      -- get sql for waiter
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.[sql_handle]) 
WHERE r.session_id = t1.request_session_id) AS [waiter_batch],
(SELECT SUBSTRING(qt.[text],r.statement_start_offset/2, 
    (CASE WHEN r.statement_end_offset = -1 
    THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 
    ELSE r.statement_end_offset END - r.statement_start_offset)/2) 
FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.[sql_handle]) AS qt
WHERE r.session_id = t1.request_session_id) AS [waiter_stmt],					-- statement blocked
t2.blocking_session_id AS [blocker sid],										-- spid of blocker
(SELECT [text] FROM sys.sysprocesses AS p										-- get sql for blocker
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(p.[sql_handle]) 
WHERE p.spid = t2.blocking_session_id) AS [blocker_batch]
FROM sys.dm_tran_locks AS t1 WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_waiting_tasks AS t2 WITH (NOLOCK)
ON t1.lock_owner_address = t2.resource_address OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps troubleshoot blocking and deadlocking issues
-- The results will change from second to second on a busy system
-- You should run this query multiple times when you see signs of blocking



-- Page Life Expectancy (PLE) value for each NUMA node in current instance  (Query 10) (PLE by NUMA Node)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], RTRIM([object_name]) AS [Object Name], instance_name, cntr_value AS [Page Life Expectancy]
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N'%Buffer Node%' -- Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N'Page life expectancy' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- PLE is a good measurement of internal memory pressure
-- Higher PLE is better. Watch the trend over time, not the absolute value
-- This will only return one row for non-NUMA systems

-- Page Life Expectancy isn�t what you think�
-- https://bit.ly/2EgynLa


-- Memory Grants Pending value for current instance  (Query 11) (Memory Grants Pending)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], RTRIM([object_name]) AS [Object Name], cntr_value AS [Memory Grants Pending]                                                                                                       
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N'%Memory Manager%' -- Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N'Memory Grants Pending' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Run multiple times, and run periodically if you suspect you are under memory pressure
-- Memory Grants Pending above zero for a sustained period is a very strong indicator of internal memory pressure


-- Memory Clerk Usage for instance  (Query 12) (Memory Clerk Usage)
-- Look for high value for CACHESTORE_SQLCP (Ad-hoc query plans)
SELECT TOP(10) mc.[type] AS [Memory Clerk Type], 
       CAST((SUM(mc.pages_kb)/1024.0) AS DECIMAL (15,2)) AS [Memory Usage (MB)] 
FROM sys.dm_os_memory_clerks AS mc WITH (NOLOCK)
GROUP BY mc.[type]  
ORDER BY SUM(mc.pages_kb) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- MEMORYCLERK_SQLBUFFERPOOL was new for SQL Server 2012. It should be your highest consumer of memory

-- CACHESTORE_SQLCP  SQL Plans         
-- These are cached SQL statements or batches that aren't in stored procedures, functions and triggers
-- Watch out for high values for CACHESTORE_SQLCP
-- Enabling 'optimize for ad hoc workloads' at the instance level can help reduce this


-- CACHESTORE_OBJCP  Object Plans      
-- These are compiled plans for stored procedures, functions and triggers



-- Find single-use, ad-hoc and prepared queries that are bloating the plan cache  (Query 13) (Ad hoc Queries)   
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], t.[text] AS [Query Text], 
cp.objtype AS [Object Type], cp.cacheobjtype AS [Cache Object Type],  
cp.size_in_bytes/1024 AS [Plan Size in KB]
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t
WHERE cp.cacheobjtype = N'Compiled Plan' 
AND cp.objtype IN (N'Adhoc', N'Prepared') 
AND cp.usecounts = 1
ORDER BY cp.size_in_bytes DESC, DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you the text, type and size of single-use ad-hoc and prepared queries that waste space in the plan cache
-- Enabling forced parameterization for the database can help, but test first!

-- Plan cache, adhoc workloads and clearing the single-use plan cache bloat
-- https://bit.ly/2EfYOkl






-- Database specific queries *****************************************************************


-- Azure SQL Database size  (Query 14) (Azure SQL DB Size)
SELECT CAST(SUM(CAST(FILEPROPERTY(name, 'SpaceUsed') AS bigint) * 8192.) / 1024 / 1024 AS DECIMAL(15,2)) AS [Database Size In MB],
       CAST(SUM(CAST(FILEPROPERTY(name, 'SpaceUsed') AS bigint) * 8192.) / 1024 / 1024 / 1024 AS DECIMAL(15,2)) AS [Database Size In GB]
FROM sys.database_files WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [type_desc] = N'ROWS' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This gives you the actual space usage within the data file only, to match what the Azure portal shows for the database size

-- Determining Database Size in Azure SQL Database V12
-- https://bit.ly/2JjrqNh



-- Individual File Sizes and space available for current database  (Query 15) (File Sizes and Space)
SELECT f.name AS [File Name] , f.physical_name AS [Physical Name], 
CAST((f.size/128.0) AS DECIMAL(15,2)) AS [Total Size in MB],
CAST(f.size/128.0 - CAST(FILEPROPERTY(f.name, 'SpaceUsed') AS int)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(15,2)) 
AS [Available Space In MB], f.[file_id], fg.name AS [Filegroup Name],
f.is_percent_growth, f.growth, fg.is_default, fg.is_read_only, 
fg.is_autogrow_all_files
FROM sys.database_files AS f WITH (NOLOCK) 
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.filegroups AS fg WITH (NOLOCK)
ON f.data_space_id = fg.data_space_id
ORDER BY f.[file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at how large and how full the files are and where they are located

-- is_autogrow_all_files was new for SQL Server 2016. Equivalent to TF 1117 for user databases

-- SQL Server 2016: Changes in default behavior for autogrow and allocations for tempdb and user databases
-- http://bit.ly/2evRZSR



-- Log space usage for current database  (Query 16) (Log Space Usage)
SELECT DB_NAME(lsu.database_id) AS [Database Name], db.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model],
		CAST(lsu.total_log_size_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Total Log Space (MB)],
		CAST(lsu.used_log_space_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Used Log Space (MB)], 
		CAST(lsu.used_log_space_in_percent AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Used Log Space %],
		CAST(lsu.log_space_in_bytes_since_last_backup/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Used Log Space Since Last Backup (MB)],
		db.log_reuse_wait_desc		 
FROM sys.dm_db_log_space_usage AS lsu WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.databases AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
ON lsu.database_id = db.database_id
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at log file size and usage, along with the log reuse wait description for the current database


-- Get VLF Counts for current database (Query 17) (VLF Counts)
SELECT�[name] AS [Database Name],�[VLF Count] 
FROM�sys.databases�AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY�(SELECT�file_id, COUNT(*)�AS [VLF Count]�
			 FROM sys.dm_db_log_info(db.database_id) 
����������   GROUP BY�file_id)�AS li
WHERE [name] <> N'master'
ORDER BY [VLF Count] DESC  OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- High VLF counts can affect write performance to the log file
-- and they can make full database restores and crash recovery take much longer
-- Try to keep your VLF counts under 200 in most cases (depending on log file size)

-- Important change to VLF creation algorithm in SQL Server 2014
-- https://bit.ly/2Hsjbg4



-- Status of last VLF for current database  (Query 18) (Last VLF Status)
SELECT TOP(1) DB_NAME(li.database_id) AS [Database Name], li.[file_id],
               li.vlf_size_mb, li.vlf_sequence_number, li.vlf_active, li.vlf_status
FROM sys.dm_db_log_info(DB_ID()) AS li 
ORDER BY vlf_sequence_number DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Determine whether you will be able to shrink the transaction log file

-- vlf_status Values
-- 0 is inactive 
-- 1 is initialized but unused 
-- 2 is active


-- Important database properties for current database   (Query 19) (Database Properties)
SELECT db.[name] AS [Database Name], db.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model], 
db.state_desc, db.containment_desc, db.log_reuse_wait_desc AS [Log Reuse Wait Description], 
db.[compatibility_level] AS [DB Compatibility Level], 
db.is_mixed_page_allocation_on, db.page_verify_option_desc AS [Page Verify Option], 
db.is_auto_create_stats_on, db.is_auto_update_stats_on, db.is_auto_update_stats_async_on, db.is_parameterization_forced, 
db.snapshot_isolation_state_desc, db.is_read_committed_snapshot_on, db.is_auto_close_on, db.is_auto_shrink_on, 
db.target_recovery_time_in_seconds, db.is_cdc_enabled, db.is_memory_optimized_elevate_to_snapshot_on, 
db.delayed_durability_desc, db.is_auto_create_stats_incremental_on,
db.is_query_store_on, db.is_sync_with_backup, db.is_temporal_history_retention_enabled,
db.is_encrypted  
FROM sys.databases AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE db.[name] <> N'master'
ORDER BY db.[name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Things to look at:
-- What recovery models are you using?
-- What is the log reuse wait description?
-- What compatibility level are the databases on? 
-- What is the Page Verify Option? (should be CHECKSUM)
-- Is Auto Update Statistics Asynchronously enabled?
-- Is Delayed Durability enabled?
-- Make sure auto_shrink and auto_close are not enabled!



-- Get database scoped configuration values for current database (Query 20) (Database-scoped Configurations)
SELECT configuration_id, [name], [value] AS [value_for_primary]
FROM sys.database_scoped_configurations WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This lets you see the value of these new properties for the current database

-- Clear plan cache for current database
-- ALTER DATABASE SCOPED CONFIGURATION CLEAR PROCEDURE_CACHE;

-- ALTER DATABASE SCOPED CONFIGURATION (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2sOH7nb


-- I/O Statistics by file for the current database  (Query 21) (IO Stats By File)
SELECT DB_NAME(DB_ID()) AS [Database Name], df.name AS [Logical Name], vfs.[file_id], df.type_desc,
df.physical_name AS [Physical Name], CAST(vfs.size_on_disk_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Size on Disk (MB)],
vfs.num_of_reads, vfs.num_of_writes, vfs.io_stall_read_ms, vfs.io_stall_write_ms,
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_read_ms/(vfs.io_stall_read_ms + vfs.io_stall_write_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_write_ms/(vfs.io_stall_write_ms + vfs.io_stall_read_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Writes Pct],
(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS [Writes + Reads], 
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_read/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Read], 
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_written/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Written],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_reads/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_writes/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Write Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_read/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Read Bytes Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_written/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Written Bytes Pct]
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(DB_ID(), NULL) AS vfs
INNER JOIN sys.database_files AS df WITH (NOLOCK)
ON vfs.[file_id]= df.[file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you characterize your workload better from an I/O perspective for this database
-- It helps you determine whether you has an OLTP or DW/DSS type of workload


-- Get recent resource usage (Query 22) (Recent Resource Usage)
SELECT dtu_limit, cpu_limit, avg_cpu_percent, avg_data_io_percent, avg_log_write_percent, avg_memory_usage_percent, xtp_storage_percent,
       max_worker_percent, max_session_percent,  avg_login_rate_percent, end_time 
FROM sys.dm_db_resource_stats WITH (NOLOCK) 
ORDER BY end_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Returns a row of usage metrics every 15 seconds, going back 64 minutes
-- The end_time column is UTC time

-- sys.dm_db_resource_stats (Azure SQL Database)
-- https://bit.ly/2HaSpKn



-- Get recent resource usage (Query 23) (Avg/Max Resource Usage)
SELECT AVG(avg_cpu_percent) AS [Average CPU Utilization In Percent],   
       MAX(avg_cpu_percent) AS [Maximum CPU Utilization In Percent],   
       AVG(avg_data_io_percent) AS [Average Data IO In Percent],   
       MAX(avg_data_io_percent) AS [Maximum Data IO In Percent],   
       AVG(avg_log_write_percent) AS [Average Log Write Utilization In Percent],   
       MAX(avg_log_write_percent) AS [Maximum Log Write Utilization In Percent],   
       AVG(avg_memory_usage_percent) AS [Average Memory Usage In Percent],   
       MAX(avg_memory_usage_percent) AS [Maximum Memory Usage In Percent]   
FROM sys.dm_db_resource_stats WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE); 
------


-- Isolate top waits for this database since last restart or failover (Query 24) (Top DB Waits)
WITH [Waits] 
AS (SELECT wait_type, wait_time_ms/ 1000.0 AS [WaitS],
          (wait_time_ms - signal_wait_time_ms) / 1000.0 AS [ResourceS],
           signal_wait_time_ms / 1000.0 AS [SignalS],
           waiting_tasks_count AS [WaitCount],
           100.0 *  wait_time_ms / SUM (wait_time_ms) OVER() AS [Percentage],
           ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY wait_time_ms DESC) AS [RowNum]
    FROM sys.dm_db_wait_stats WITH (NOLOCK)
    WHERE [wait_type] NOT IN (
        N'BROKER_EVENTHANDLER', N'BROKER_RECEIVE_WAITFOR', N'BROKER_TASK_STOP',
		N'BROKER_TO_FLUSH', N'BROKER_TRANSMITTER', N'CHECKPOINT_QUEUE',
        N'CHKPT', N'CLR_AUTO_EVENT', N'CLR_MANUAL_EVENT', N'CLR_SEMAPHORE',
        N'DBMIRROR_DBM_EVENT', N'DBMIRROR_EVENTS_QUEUE', N'DBMIRROR_WORKER_QUEUE',
		N'DBMIRRORING_CMD', N'DIRTY_PAGE_POLL', N'DISPATCHER_QUEUE_SEMAPHORE',
        N'EXECSYNC', N'FSAGENT', N'FT_IFTS_SCHEDULER_IDLE_WAIT', N'FT_IFTSHC_MUTEX',
        N'HADR_CLUSAPI_CALL', N'HADR_FILESTREAM_IOMGR_IOCOMPLETION', N'HADR_LOGCAPTURE_WAIT', 
		N'HADR_NOTIFICATION_DEQUEUE', N'HADR_TIMER_TASK', N'HADR_WORK_QUEUE',
        N'KSOURCE_WAKEUP', N'LAZYWRITER_SLEEP', N'LOGMGR_QUEUE', 
		N'MEMORY_ALLOCATION_EXT', N'ONDEMAND_TASK_QUEUE',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_HADR_LEASE_MECHANISM', N'PREEMPTIVE_SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_ODBCOPS',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_LIBRARYOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_COMOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_CRYPTOPS',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_PIPEOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_AUTHENTICATIONOPS',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_GENERICOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_VERIFYTRUST',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_FILEOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_DEVICEOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_QUERYREGISTRY',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_WRITEFILE',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_CALLBACKEXECUTE', N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_DISPATCHER',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_GETTARGETSTATE', N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_SESSIONCOMMIT',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_TARGETINIT', N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_TARGETFINALIZE',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_XHTTP',
        N'PWAIT_ALL_COMPONENTS_INITIALIZED', N'PWAIT_DIRECTLOGCONSUMER_GETNEXT',
		N'QDS_PERSIST_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP',
		N'QDS_ASYNC_QUEUE',
        N'QDS_CLEANUP_STALE_QUERIES_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP', N'REQUEST_FOR_DEADLOCK_SEARCH',
		N'RESOURCE_GOVERNOR_IDLE',
		N'RESOURCE_QUEUE', N'SERVER_IDLE_CHECK', N'SLEEP_BPOOL_FLUSH', N'SLEEP_DBSTARTUP',
		N'SLEEP_DCOMSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_MASTERDBREADY', N'SLEEP_MASTERMDREADY',
        N'SLEEP_MASTERUPGRADED', N'SLEEP_MSDBSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_SYSTEMTASK', N'SLEEP_TASK',
        N'SLEEP_TEMPDBSTARTUP', N'SNI_HTTP_ACCEPT', N'SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS_SLEEP',
		N'SQLTRACE_BUFFER_FLUSH', N'SQLTRACE_INCREMENTAL_FLUSH_SLEEP', N'SQLTRACE_WAIT_ENTRIES',
		N'WAIT_FOR_RESULTS', N'WAITFOR', N'WAITFOR_TASKSHUTDOWN', N'WAIT_XTP_HOST_WAIT',
		N'WAIT_XTP_OFFLINE_CKPT_NEW_LOG', N'WAIT_XTP_CKPT_CLOSE', N'WAIT_XTP_RECOVERY',
		N'XE_BUFFERMGR_ALLPROCESSED_EVENT', N'XE_DISPATCHER_JOIN',
        N'XE_DISPATCHER_WAIT', N'XE_LIVE_TARGET_TVF', N'XE_TIMER_EVENT')
    AND waiting_tasks_count > 0)
SELECT
    MAX (W1.wait_type) AS [WaitType],
	CAST (MAX (W1.Percentage) AS DECIMAL (5,2)) AS [Wait Percentage],
	CAST ((MAX (W1.WaitS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgWait_Sec],
    CAST ((MAX (W1.ResourceS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgRes_Sec],
    CAST ((MAX (W1.SignalS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgSig_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.WaitS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Total_Wait_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.ResourceS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Resource_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.SignalS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Signal_Sec],
    MAX (W1.WaitCount) AS [Wait Count]   
FROM Waits AS W1
INNER JOIN Waits AS W2
ON W2.RowNum <= W1.RowNum
GROUP BY W1.RowNum
HAVING SUM (W2.Percentage) - MAX (W1.Percentage) < 99 -- percentage threshold
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Cumulative wait stats are not as useful on an idle instance that is not under load or performance pressure

-- SQL Server Wait Types Library (Paul Randal)
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/help/waits/

-- The SQL Server Wait Type Repository
-- http://blogs.msdn.com/b/psssql/archive/2009/11/03/the-sql-server-wait-type-repository.aspx

-- Wait statistics, or please tell me where it hurts
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/paul/wait-statistics-or-please-tell-me-where-it-hurts/

-- SQL Server 2005 Performance Tuning using the Waits and Queues
-- http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc966413.aspx

-- sys.dm_os_wait_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms179984(v=sql.120).aspx



-- Get most frequently executed queries for this database (Query 25) (Query Execution Counts)
SELECT TOP(50) LEFT(t.[text], 50) AS [Short Query Text], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
qs.total_logical_reads AS [Total Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time AS [Total Elapsed Time],
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
WHERE t.dbid = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Get top total worker time queries for this database (Query 26) (Top Worker Time Queries)		
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], 
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 50), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text],  
qs.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time], qs.min_worker_time AS [Min Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.max_worker_time AS [Max Worker Time], 
qs.min_elapsed_time AS [Min Elapsed Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time AS [Max Elapsed Time],
qs.min_logical_reads AS [Min Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.max_logical_reads AS [Max Logical Reads], 
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],  
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE t.dbid = DB_ID() 
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you find the most expensive queries from a CPU perspective for this database
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues


-- Get top total logical reads queries for this database (Query 27) (Top Logical Reads Queries)    
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name],
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 50), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text], 
qs.total_logical_reads AS [Total Logical Reads],
qs.min_logical_reads AS [Min Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.max_logical_reads AS [Max Logical Reads],   
qs.min_worker_time AS [Min Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.max_worker_time AS [Max Worker Time], 
qs.min_elapsed_time AS [Min Elapsed Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time AS [Max Elapsed Time],
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],   
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE t.dbid = DB_ID()  
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Helps you find the most expensive queries from a memory perspective for this database
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues



-- Get top average elapsed time queries for this database (Query 28) (Top Avg Elapsed Time Queries)   
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], 
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 255), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text],  
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
qs.min_elapsed_time, qs.max_elapsed_time, qs.last_elapsed_time,
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],  
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads], 
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Physical Reads], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],  
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
, qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- comment out this column if copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE t.dbid = DB_ID()  
ORDER BY qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you find the highest average elapsed time queries for this database
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues



-- Top Cached SPs By Execution Count (Query 29) (SP Execution Counts)
SELECT TOP(100) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time],    
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you which cached stored procedures are called the most often
-- This helps you characterize and baseline your workload


-- Top Cached SPs By Avg Elapsed Time (Query 30) (SP Avg Elapsed Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.min_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time, qs.last_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], 
qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY avg_elapsed_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find high average elapsed time cached stored procedures that
-- may be easy to optimize with standard query tuning techniques



-- Top Cached SPs By Total Worker time. Worker time relates to CPU cost  (Query 31) (SP Worker Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a CPU perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of CPU pressure


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Reads. Logical reads relate to memory pressure  (Query 32) (SP Logical Reads)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_reads AS [TotalLogicalReads], 
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalReads],qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute], 
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a memory perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of memory pressure


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Physical Reads. Physical reads relate to disk read I/O pressure  (Query 33) (SP Physical Reads)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name],qs.total_physical_reads AS [TotalPhysicalReads], 
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgPhysicalReads], qs.execution_count, 
qs.total_logical_reads,qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan 
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND qs.total_physical_reads > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_physical_reads DESC, qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a read I/O perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of I/O pressure or of memory pressure
       


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Writes (Query 34) (SP Logical Writes)
-- Logical writes relate to both memory and disk I/O pressure 
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_writes AS [TotalLogicalWrites], 
qs.total_logical_writes/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalWrites], qs.execution_count,
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan 
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND qs.total_logical_writes > 0
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_writes DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a write I/O perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of I/O pressure or of memory pressure



-- Lists the top statements by average input/output usage for the current database  (Query 35) (Top IO Statements)
SELECT TOP(50) OBJECT_NAME(qt.objectid, dbid) AS [SP Name],
(qs.total_logical_reads + qs.total_logical_writes) /qs.execution_count AS [Avg IO], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
SUBSTRING(qt.[text],qs.statement_start_offset/2, 
	(CASE 
		WHEN qs.statement_end_offset = -1 
	 THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 
		ELSE qs.statement_end_offset 
	 END - qs.statement_start_offset)/2) AS [Query Text]	
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) AS qt
WHERE qt.[dbid] = DB_ID()
ORDER BY [Avg IO] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you find the most expensive statements for I/O by SP



-- Possible Bad NC Indexes (writes > reads)  (Query 36) (Bad NC Indexes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(s.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], i.name AS [Index Name], i.index_id, 
i.is_disabled, i.is_hypothetical, i.has_filter, i.fill_factor,
user_updates AS [Total Writes], user_seeks + user_scans + user_lookups AS [Total Reads],
user_updates - (user_seeks + user_scans + user_lookups) AS [Difference]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(s.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
AND user_updates > (user_seeks + user_scans + user_lookups)
AND i.index_id > 1
ORDER BY [Difference] DESC, [Total Writes] DESC, [Total Reads] ASC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look for indexes with high numbers of writes and zero or very low numbers of reads
-- Consider your complete workload, and how long your instance has been running
-- Investigate further before dropping an index!


-- Missing Indexes for current database by Index Advantage  (Query 37) (Missing Indexes)
SELECT DISTINCT CONVERT(decimal(18,2), user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01)) AS [index_advantage], 
migs.last_user_seek, mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, migs.avg_total_user_cost, migs.avg_user_impact,
OBJECT_NAME(mid.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], p.rows AS [Table Rows]
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = mid.[object_id]
WHERE mid.database_id = DB_ID() 
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at index advantage, last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
-- SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware
-- Do not just blindly add indexes that show up from this query!!!


-- Find missing index warnings for cached plans in the current database  (Query 38) (Missing Index Warnings)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a busy instance
SELECT TOP(25) OBJECT_NAME(objectid) AS [ObjectName], 
               cp.objtype, cp.usecounts, cp.size_in_bytes, query_plan
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(cp.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE CAST(query_plan AS NVARCHAR(MAX)) LIKE N'%MissingIndex%'
AND dbid = DB_ID()
ORDER BY cp.usecounts DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you connect missing indexes to specific stored procedures or queries
-- This can help you decide whether to add them or not


-- Breaks down buffers used by current database by object (table, index) in the buffer cache  (Query 39) (Buffer Usage)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a busy instance
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) AS [Object Name], p.index_id, 
CAST(COUNT(*)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Buffer size(MB)],  
COUNT(*) AS [BufferCount], p.[Rows] AS [Row Count],
p.data_compression_desc AS [Compression Type]
FROM sys.allocation_units AS a WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors AS b WITH (NOLOCK)
ON a.allocation_unit_id = b.allocation_unit_id
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON a.container_id = p.hobt_id
WHERE b.database_id = CONVERT(int, DB_ID())
AND p.[object_id] > 100
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'plan_%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'xml_index_nodes%'
GROUP BY p.[object_id], p.index_id, p.data_compression_desc, p.[Rows]
ORDER BY [BufferCount] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you what tables and indexes are using the most memory in the buffer cache
-- It can help identify possible candidates for data compression


-- Get Table names, row counts, and compression status for clustered index or heap  (Query 40) (Table Sizes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS [ObjectName], 
SUM(Rows) AS [RowCount], data_compression_desc AS [CompressionType]
FROM sys.partitions WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE index_id < 2 --ignore the partitions from the non-clustered index if any
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'queue_%' 
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'filestream_tombstone%' 
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'fulltext%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'ifts_comp_fragment%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'filetable_updates%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'xml_index_nodes%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'sqlagent_job%'  
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'plan_persist%'  
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'persistent_version%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'database_firewall%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'wpr_bucket%'
GROUP BY object_id, data_compression_desc
ORDER BY SUM(Rows) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you an idea of table sizes, and possible data compression opportunities



-- Get some key table properties (Query 41) (Table Properties)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], p.[rows] AS [Table Rows], p.index_id, 
       p.data_compression_desc AS [Index Data Compression],
       t.create_date, t.lock_on_bulk_load,  
       t.is_tracked_by_cdc, t.lock_escalation_desc, t.is_filetable, 
	   t.is_memory_optimized, t.durability_desc, 
	   t.temporal_type_desc
FROM sys.tables AS t WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON t.[object_id] = p.[object_id]
WHERE OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
ORDER BY OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]), p.index_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some good information about your tables
-- is_memory_optimized and durability_desc were new in SQL Server 2014
-- temporal_type_desc, is_remote_data_archive_enabled, is_external are new in SQL Server 2016

-- sys.tables (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2Gk7998



-- When were Statistics last updated on all indexes?  (Query 42) (Statistics Update)
SELECT SCHEMA_NAME(o.Schema_ID) + N'.' + o.[NAME] AS [Object Name], o.[type_desc] AS [Object Type],
      i.[name] AS [Index Name], STATS_DATE(i.[object_id], i.index_id) AS [Statistics Date], 
      s.auto_created, s.no_recompute, s.user_created, s.is_incremental, s.is_temporary,
	  st.row_count, st.used_page_count
FROM sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON o.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id] 
AND i.index_id = s.stats_id
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_partition_stats AS st WITH (NOLOCK)
ON o.[object_id] = st.[object_id]
AND i.[index_id] = st.[index_id]
WHERE o.[type] IN ('U', 'V')
AND st.row_count > 0
ORDER BY STATS_DATE(i.[object_id], i.index_id) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------  

-- Helps discover possible problems with out-of-date statistics
-- Also gives you an idea which indexes are the most active

-- sys.stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2GyAxrn



-- Look at most frequently modified indexes and statistics (Query 43) (Volatile Indexes)
SELECT o.[name] AS [Object Name], o.[object_id], o.[type_desc], s.[name] AS [Statistics Name], 
       s.stats_id, s.no_recompute, s.auto_created, s.is_incremental, s.is_temporary,
	   sp.modification_counter, sp.[rows], sp.rows_sampled, sp.last_updated
FROM sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.object_id = o.object_id
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_db_stats_properties(s.object_id, s.stats_id) AS sp
WHERE o.[type_desc] NOT IN (N'SYSTEM_TABLE', N'INTERNAL_TABLE')
AND sp.modification_counter > 0
ORDER BY sp.modification_counter DESC, o.name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you understand your workload and make better decisions about 
-- things like data compression and adding new indexes to a table



-- Get fragmentation info for all indexes above a certain size in the current database  (Query 44) (Index Fragmentation)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a very large database
SELECT DB_NAME(ps.database_id) AS [Database Name], SCHEMA_NAME(o.[schema_id]) AS [Schema Name],
OBJECT_NAME(ps.OBJECT_ID) AS [Object Name], i.[name] AS [Index Name], ps.index_id, 
ps.index_type_desc, ps.avg_fragmentation_in_percent, 
ps.fragment_count, ps.page_count, i.fill_factor, i.has_filter, 
i.filter_definition, i.[allow_page_locks]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats(DB_ID(),NULL, NULL, NULL , N'LIMITED') AS ps
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ps.[object_id] = i.[object_id] 
AND ps.index_id = i.index_id
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
WHERE ps.database_id = DB_ID()
AND ps.page_count > 2500
ORDER BY ps.avg_fragmentation_in_percent DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine whether you have framentation in your relational indexes
-- and how effective your index maintenance strategy is


--- Index Read/Write stats (all tables in current DB) ordered by Reads  (Query 45) (Overall Index Usage - Reads)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], i.[name] AS [IndexName], i.index_id, 
       s.user_seeks, s.user_scans, s.user_lookups,
	   s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads], 
	   s.user_updates AS [Writes],  
	   i.[type_desc] AS [Index Type], i.fill_factor AS [Fill Factor], i.has_filter, i.filter_definition, 
	   s.last_user_scan, s.last_user_lookup, s.last_user_seek
FROM sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(i.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
ORDER BY s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE); -- Order by reads
------

-- Show which indexes in the current database are most active for Reads


--- Index Read/Write stats (all tables in current DB) ordered by Writes  (Query 46) (Overall Index Usage - Writes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], i.[name] AS [IndexName], i.index_id,
	   s.user_updates AS [Writes], s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads], 
	   i.[type_desc] AS [Index Type], i.fill_factor AS [Fill Factor], i.has_filter, i.filter_definition,
	   s.last_system_update, s.last_user_update
FROM sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(i.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
ORDER BY s.user_updates DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);						 -- Order by writes
------

-- Show which indexes in the current database are most active for Writes


-- Get in-memory OLTP index usage (Query 47) (XTP Index Usage)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [Object Name], i.index_id, i.[name] AS [Index Name],
       i.[type_desc], xis.scans_started, xis.scans_retries, 
	   xis.rows_touched, xis.rows_returned
FROM sys.dm_db_xtp_index_stats AS xis WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = xis.[object_id] 
AND i.index_id = xis.index_id 
ORDER BY OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This gives you some index usage statistics for in-memory OLTP
-- Returns no data if you are not using in-memory OLTP

-- Guidelines for Using Indexes on Memory-Optimized Tables
-- https://bit.ly/2GCP8lF



-- Look at Columnstore index physical statistics (Query 48) (Columnstore Index Physical Stat)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(ps.object_id) AS [TableName],  
	i.[name] AS [IndexName], ps.index_id, ps.partition_number,
	ps.delta_store_hobt_id, ps.state_desc, ps.total_rows, ps.size_in_bytes,
	ps.trim_reason_desc, ps.generation, ps.transition_to_compressed_state_desc,
	ps.has_vertipaq_optimization, ps.deleted_rows,
	100 * (ISNULL(ps.deleted_rows, 0))/ps.total_rows AS [Fragmentation]
FROM sys.dm_db_column_store_row_group_physical_stats AS ps WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ps.object_id = i.object_id 
AND ps.index_id = i.index_id
ORDER BY ps.object_id, ps.partition_number, ps.row_group_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- sys.dm_db_column_store_row_group_physical_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2q276XQ



-- Get lock waits for current database (Query 49) (Lock Waits)
SELECT o.name AS [table_name], i.name AS [index_name], ios.index_id, ios.partition_number,
		SUM(ios.row_lock_wait_count) AS [total_row_lock_waits], 
		SUM(ios.row_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_row_lock_wait_in_ms],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_count) AS [total_page_lock_waits],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_page_lock_wait_in_ms],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms)+ SUM(row_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_lock_wait_in_ms]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_operational_stats(DB_ID(), NULL, NULL, NULL) AS ios
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ios.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ios.[object_id] = i.[object_id] 
AND ios.index_id = i.index_id
WHERE o.[object_id] > 100
GROUP BY o.name, i.name, ios.index_id, ios.partition_number
HAVING SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms)+ SUM(row_lock_wait_in_ms) > 0
ORDER BY total_lock_wait_in_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This query is helpful for troubleshooting blocking and deadlocking issues



-- Look at UDF execution statistics (Query 50) (UDF Statistics)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS [Function Name], total_worker_time,
       execution_count, total_elapsed_time,  
       total_elapsed_time/execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],  
       last_elapsed_time, last_execution_time, cached_time 
FROM sys.dm_exec_function_stats WITH (NOLOCK) 
WHERE database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE); 
------


-- Helps you investigate scalar UDF performance issues

-- sys.dm_exec_function_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2q1Q6BM




-- Get QueryStore Options for this database (Query 51) (QueryStore Options)
SELECT actual_state_desc, desired_state_desc,
       current_storage_size_mb, [max_storage_size_mb], 
	   query_capture_mode_desc, size_based_cleanup_mode_desc
FROM sys.database_query_store_options WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- New for SQL Server 2016
-- Requires that QueryStore is enabled for this database

-- Tuning Workload Performance with Query Store
-- https://bit.ly/1kHSl7w


-- Get highest aggregate duration queries over last hour (Query 52) (High Aggregate Duration Queries)
WITH AggregatedDurationLastHour
AS
(SELECT q.query_id, SUM(count_executions * avg_duration) AS total_duration,
   COUNT (distinct p.plan_id) AS number_of_plans
   FROM sys.query_store_query_text AS qt WITH (NOLOCK)
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query AS q WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON qt.query_text_id = q.query_text_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_plan AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON q.query_id = p.query_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_runtime_stats AS rs WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON rs.plan_id = p.plan_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_runtime_stats_interval AS rsi WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON rsi.runtime_stats_interval_id = rs.runtime_stats_interval_id
   WHERE rsi.start_time >= DATEADD(hour, -1, GETUTCDATE()) 
   AND rs.execution_type_desc = N'Regular'
   GROUP BY q.query_id),
OrderedDuration AS
(SELECT query_id, total_duration, number_of_plans, 
 ROW_NUMBER () OVER (ORDER BY total_duration DESC, query_id) AS RN
 FROM AggregatedDurationLastHour)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(q.object_id) AS [Containing Object], qt.query_sql_text, 
od.total_duration AS [Total Duration (microsecs)], 
od.number_of_plans AS [Plan Count],
p.is_forced_plan, p.is_parallel_plan, p.is_trivial_plan,
q.query_parameterization_type_desc, p.[compatibility_level],
p.last_compile_start_time, q.last_execution_time,
CONVERT(xml, p.query_plan) AS query_plan_xml 
FROM OrderedDuration AS od 
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query AS q WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_id  = od.query_id
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query_text AS qt WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_text_id = qt.query_text_id
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_plan AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_id = p.query_id
WHERE od.RN <= 50 
ORDER BY total_duration DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- New for SQL Server 2016
-- Requires that QueryStore is enabled for this database


-- Get input buffer information for the current database (Query 53) (Input Buffer)
SELECT es.session_id, DB_NAME(es.database_id) AS [Database Name],
       es.login_time, es.cpu_time, es.logical_reads,
       es.[status], ib.event_info AS [Input Buffer]
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions AS es WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_input_buffer(es.session_id, NULL) AS ib
WHERE es.database_id = DB_ID()
AND es.session_id > 50
AND es.session_id <> @@SPID OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you input buffer information from all non-system sessions for the current database
-- Replaces DBCC INPUTBUFFER

-- New DMF for retrieving input buffer in SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2uHKMbz



-- Get any resumable index rebuild operation information (Query 54) (Resumable Index Rebuild)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(iro.object_id) AS [Object Name], iro.index_id, iro.name AS [Index Name],
       iro.sql_text, iro.last_max_dop_used, iro.partition_number, iro.state_desc, iro.start_time, iro.percent_complete
FROM  sys.index_resumable_operations AS iro WITH (NOLOCK)
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------ 

-- index_resumable_operations (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pYSWqq


-- Get database automatic tuning options (Query 55) (Automatic Tuning Options)
SELECT [name], desired_state_desc, actual_state_desc, reason_desc
FROM sys.database_automatic_tuning_options WITH (NOLOCK)
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------ 

-- sys.database_automatic_tuning_options (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2FHhLkL



-- Get geo-replication link status for all secondary databases (Query 56) (Geo-Replication Link Status)
SELECT link_guid, partner_server, partner_database, last_replication, 
       replication_lag_sec, replication_state_desc, role_desc, secondary_allow_connections_desc 
FROM sys.dm_geo_replication_link_status WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------  

-- sys.dm_geo_replication_link_status (Azure SQL Database)
-- https://bit.ly/2GwIqC2



-- Retrieve some Azure SQL Database properties (Query 57) (Azure SQL DB Properties)
SELECT DATABASEPROPERTYEX (DB_NAME(DB_ID()), 'Edition') AS [Database Edition],
	   DATABASEPROPERTYEX (DB_NAME(DB_ID()), 'ServiceObjective') AS [Service Objective],
	   DATABASEPROPERTYEX (DB_NAME(DB_ID()), 'MaxSizeInBytes') AS [Max Size In Bytes],
	   DATABASEPROPERTYEX (DB_NAME(DB_ID()), 'IsXTPSupported') AS [Is XTP Supported]
	   OPTION (RECOMPILE);   
------  

-- DATABASEPROPERTYEX (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2ItexPg





-- Sign up for Microsoft Visual Studio Dev Essentials and get a free three month pass to Pluralsight

-- Microsoft Visual Studio Dev Essentials
-- https://bit.ly/1q6xbDL


-- Sign up for Microsoft Azure Essentials and get lots of free Azure usage credits, MCP exam voucher, three month Pluralsight subscription

-- Microsoft Azure Essentials
-- https://bit.ly/2KH91dQ


tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools.Tests\dbatools.Tests.csproj
 
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools.Tests\packages.config
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<packages>
  <package id="MSTest.TestFramework" version="1.3.2" targetFramework="net452" />
</packages>
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools.Tests\Parameter\DbaInstanceParamaterTest.cs
using System;
using System.Net;
using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
using Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Connection;
using Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Exceptions;

namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Parameter
{
    [TestClass]
    public class DbaInstanceParamaterTest
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestStringConstructor()
        {
            var dbaInstanceParamater = new DbaInstanceParameter("someMachine");

            Assert.AreEqual("someMachine", dbaInstanceParamater.FullName);
            Assert.AreEqual("someMachine", dbaInstanceParamater.FullSmoName);
            Assert.AreEqual(SqlConnectionProtocol.Any, dbaInstanceParamater.NetworkProtocol);
            Assert.IsFalse(dbaInstanceParamater.IsLocalHost);
            Assert.IsFalse(dbaInstanceParamater.IsConnectionString);
        }

        [DataRow(null)]
        [DataRow("")]
        [DataRow(" ")]
        [DataRow("\n")]
        [DataRow(" \n \t")]
        [DataRow(" \v\t\t ")]
        [DataRow(null)]
        [ExpectedException(typeof(BloodyHellGiveMeSomethingToWorkWithException), "Bloody hell! Don't give me an empty string for an instance name!")]
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestEmptyString(string whitespace)
        {
            try
            {
                new DbaInstanceParameter(whitespace);
            }
            catch (BloodyHellGiveMeSomethingToWorkWithException ex)
            {
                Assert.AreEqual("DbaInstanceParameter", ex.ParameterClass);
                throw;
            }
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestConnectionString()
        {
            var dbaInstanceParamater = new DbaInstanceParameter("Server=tcp:server.database.windows.net;Database=myDataBase;User ID =[LoginForDb]@[serverName]; Password = myPassword; Trusted_Connection = False;Encrypt = True; ");
            Assert.IsTrue(dbaInstanceParamater.IsConnectionString);
        }

        [ExpectedException(typeof(ArgumentException))]
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestConnectionStringBadKey()
        {
            new DbaInstanceParameter("Server=tcp:server.database.windows.net;Database=myDataBase;Trusted_Connection = True;Wrong=true");
        }

        [ExpectedException(typeof(FormatException))]
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestConnectionStringBadValue()
        {
            new DbaInstanceParameter("Server=tcp:server.database.windows.net;Database=myDataBase;Trusted_Connection=weird");
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Checks that localhost\instancename is treated as a localhost connection
        /// </summary>
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestLocalhostNamedInstance()
        {
            var dbaInstanceParamater = new DbaInstanceParameter("localhost\\sql2008r2sp2");

            Assert.AreEqual("localhost\\sql2008r2sp2", dbaInstanceParamater.FullName);
            Assert.IsTrue(dbaInstanceParamater.IsLocalHost);
            Assert.AreEqual("localhost\\sql2008r2sp2", dbaInstanceParamater.FullSmoName);
            Assert.AreEqual("[localhost\\sql2008r2sp2]", dbaInstanceParamater.SqlFullName);
            Assert.AreEqual(SqlConnectionProtocol.Any, dbaInstanceParamater.NetworkProtocol);
            Assert.IsTrue(dbaInstanceParamater.IsLocalHost);
            Assert.IsFalse(dbaInstanceParamater.IsConnectionString);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Checks that . is treated as a localhost connection
        /// </summary>
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestDotHostname()
        {
            var dbaInstanceParamater = new DbaInstanceParameter(".");

            Assert.AreEqual(".", dbaInstanceParamater.ComputerName);
            Assert.AreEqual("[.]", dbaInstanceParamater.SqlComputerName);
            Assert.AreEqual(".", dbaInstanceParamater.FullName);
            Assert.IsTrue(dbaInstanceParamater.IsLocalHost);
            Assert.AreEqual("NP:.", dbaInstanceParamater.FullSmoName);
            Assert.AreEqual(@"MSSQLSERVER", dbaInstanceParamater.InstanceName);
            Assert.AreEqual(@"[MSSQLSERVER]", dbaInstanceParamater.SqlInstanceName);
            Assert.AreEqual(@"[.]", dbaInstanceParamater.SqlFullName);
            Assert.AreEqual(SqlConnectionProtocol.NP, dbaInstanceParamater.NetworkProtocol);
            Assert.IsTrue(dbaInstanceParamater.IsLocalHost);
            Assert.IsFalse(dbaInstanceParamater.IsConnectionString);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Checks that localdb named instances
        /// </summary>
        [TestMethod]
        //[Ignore()]
        public void TestLocalDb()
        {
            var dbaInstanceParamater = new DbaInstanceParameter(@"(LocalDb)\MSSQLLocalDB");

            Assert.AreEqual("localhost", dbaInstanceParamater.ComputerName);
            Assert.AreEqual("[localhost]", dbaInstanceParamater.SqlComputerName);
            Assert.AreEqual(@"(localdb)\MSSQLLocalDB", dbaInstanceParamater.FullName);
            Assert.AreEqual(@"(localdb)\MSSQLLocalDB", dbaInstanceParamater.FullSmoName);
            Assert.AreEqual(@"MSSQLLocalDB", dbaInstanceParamater.InstanceName);
            Assert.AreEqual(@"[MSSQLLocalDB]", dbaInstanceParamater.SqlInstanceName);
            Assert.AreEqual(SqlConnectionProtocol.Any, dbaInstanceParamater.NetworkProtocol);
            Assert.IsTrue(dbaInstanceParamater.IsLocalHost);
            Assert.IsFalse(dbaInstanceParamater.IsConnectionString);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Checks parsing of a localdb connectionstring
        /// </summary>
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestLocalDbConnectionString()
        {
            var dbaInstanceParamater = new DbaInstanceParameter(@"Data Source=(LocalDb)\MSSQLLocalDB;Initial Catalog=aspnet-MvcMovie;Integrated Security=SSPI;AttachDBFilename=|DataDirectory|\Movies.mdf");

            Assert.AreEqual("localhost", dbaInstanceParamater.ComputerName);
            Assert.AreEqual("[localhost]", dbaInstanceParamater.SqlComputerName);
            Assert.AreEqual(@"localhost\MSSQLLocalDB", dbaInstanceParamater.FullName);
            Assert.AreEqual(@"localhost\MSSQLLocalDB", dbaInstanceParamater.FullSmoName);
            Assert.AreEqual(@"localhost\MSSQLLocalDB", dbaInstanceParamater.ToString());
            Assert.AreEqual(@"MSSQLLocalDB", dbaInstanceParamater.InstanceName);
            Assert.AreEqual(SqlConnectionProtocol.Any, dbaInstanceParamater.NetworkProtocol);
            Assert.IsTrue(dbaInstanceParamater.IsLocalHost);
            Assert.IsTrue(dbaInstanceParamater.IsConnectionString);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Checks that 127.0.0.1 is treated as a localhost connection
        /// </summary>
        [DataRow("127.0.0.1")]
        [DataRow("::1")]
        [DataRow("0.0.0.0")]
        [DataRow("192.168.1.1")]
        [DataTestMethod]
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestIpAddressConstructor(string ipStr)
        {
            var ip = IPAddress.Parse(ipStr);
            var dbaInstanceParamater = new DbaInstanceParameter(ip);

            Assert.AreEqual(ip.ToString(), dbaInstanceParamater.FullName);
            Assert.AreEqual('[' + ip.ToString() + ']', dbaInstanceParamater.SqlFullName);
            Assert.AreEqual(ip.ToString(), dbaInstanceParamater.FullSmoName);
            Assert.AreEqual(ip.ToString(), dbaInstanceParamater.ToString());
            Assert.AreEqual(SqlConnectionProtocol.Any, dbaInstanceParamater.NetworkProtocol);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Checks that 127.0.0.1 is treated as a localhost connection
        /// </summary>
        [DataRow("127.0.0.1")]
        [DataRow("::1")]
        [DataRow("localhost")]
        [DataTestMethod]
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestLocalhost(string localhost)
        {
            var dbaInstanceParamater = new DbaInstanceParameter(localhost);

            Assert.AreEqual(localhost, dbaInstanceParamater.FullName);
            Assert.AreEqual('[' + localhost + ']', dbaInstanceParamater.SqlFullName);
            Assert.AreEqual(localhost, dbaInstanceParamater.FullSmoName);
            Assert.AreEqual(localhost, dbaInstanceParamater.ToString());
            Assert.AreEqual(SqlConnectionProtocol.Any, dbaInstanceParamater.NetworkProtocol);
            Assert.IsTrue(dbaInstanceParamater.IsLocalHost);
        }
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools.Tests\Properties\AssemblyInfo.cs
using System.Reflection;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

// General Information about an assembly is controlled through the following 
// set of attributes. Change these attribute values to modify the information
// associated with an assembly.
[assembly: AssemblyTitle("dbatools.Tests")]
[assembly: AssemblyDescription("")]
[assembly: AssemblyConfiguration("")]
[assembly: AssemblyCompany("")]
[assembly: AssemblyProduct("dbatools.Tests")]
[assembly: AssemblyCopyright("Copyright ©  2017")]
[assembly: AssemblyTrademark("")]
[assembly: AssemblyCulture("")]

// Setting ComVisible to false makes the types in this assembly not visible 
// to COM components.  If you need to access a type in this assembly from 
// COM, set the ComVisible attribute to true on that type.
[assembly: ComVisible(false)]

// The following GUID is for the ID of the typelib if this project is exposed to COM
[assembly: Guid("afd56ad2-f9f0-4c9d-901b-69ca1455c32a")]

// Version information for an assembly consists of the following four values:
//
//      Major Version
//      Minor Version 
//      Build Number
//      Revision
//
// You can specify all the values or you can default the Build and Revision Numbers 
// by using the '*' as shown below:
// [assembly: AssemblyVersion("1.0.*")]
[assembly: AssemblyVersion("1.0.0.0")]
[assembly: AssemblyFileVersion("1.0.0.0")]
tools\dbatools\bin\diagnosticquery\SQLServerDiagnosticQueries_2017_201807.sql

-- SQL Server 2017 Diagnostic Information Queries
-- Glenn Berry 
-- Last Modified: August 29, 2018
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/
-- http://sqlserverperformance.wordpress.com/
-- Twitter: GlennAlanBerry

-- Please listen to my Pluralsight courses
-- https://www.pluralsight.com/author/glenn-berry

-- If you want to find all of our SQLskills SQL101 blog posts, check out https://bit.ly/2qLwfXW


-- Please make sure you are using the correct version of these diagnostic queries for your version of SQL Server


-- If you like PowerShell, there is a very useful community solution for running these queries in an automated fashion
-- https://dbatools.io/

-- Invoke-DbaDiagnosticQuery
-- https://dbatools.io/functions/invoke-dbadiagnosticquery/


--******************************************************************************
--*   Copyright (C) 2018 Glenn Berry, SQLskills.com
--*   All rights reserved. 
--*
--*   For more scripts and sample code, check out 
--*      https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn
--*
--*   You may alter this code for your own *non-commercial* purposes. You may
--*   republish altered code as long as you include this copyright and give due credit. 
--*
--*
--*   THIS CODE AND INFORMATION ARE PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF 
--*   ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED 
--*   TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND/OR FITNESS FOR A
--*   PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
--*
--******************************************************************************

-- Check the major product version to see if it is SQL Server 2017 CTP 1 or greater
IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * WHERE CONVERT(varchar(128), SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion')) LIKE '14%')
	BEGIN
		DECLARE @ProductVersion varchar(128) = CONVERT(varchar(128), SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion'));
		RAISERROR ('Script does not match the ProductVersion [%s] of this instance. Many of these queries may not work on this version.' , 18 , 16 , @ProductVersion);
	END
	ELSE
		PRINT N'You have the correct major version of SQL Server for this diagnostic information script';
	

-- Instance level queries *******************************

-- SQL and OS Version information for current instance  (Query 1) (Version Info)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], @@VERSION AS [SQL Server and OS Version Info];
------

-- SQL Server 2017 Builds																		
-- Build			Description							Release Date	URL to KB Article								
-- 14.0.1.246		CTP 1.0								11/30/2016
-- 14.0.100.187		CTP 1.1								12/16/2016
-- 14.0.200.24		CTP 1.2								1/19/2017
-- 14.0.304.138		CTP 1.3								2/17/2017
-- 14.0.405.198		CTP 1.4								3/20/2017
-- 14.0.500.272		CTP 2.0								4/19/2017
-- 14.0.600.250		CTP 2.1								5/17/2017
-- 14.0.800.90		RC1									7/17/2017
-- 14.0.900.75		RC2									8/2/2017
-- 14.0.1000.169	RTM									10/2/2017
-- 14.0.3006.16		CU1									10/24/2017		https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4038634
-- 14.0.3008.27		CU2									11/28/2017		https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4052574
-- 14.0.3015.40		CU3									1/4/2018		https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4052987
-- 14.0.3022.28		CU4									2/20/2018	    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4056498
-- 14.0.3023.8		CU5									3/20/2018		https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4092643
-- 14.0.3025.34		CU6									4/17/2018	    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4101464
-- 14.0.3026.27		CU7									5/23/2018		https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4229789
-- 14.0.3029.16		CU8									6/19/2018		https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4338363
-- 14.0.3030.27		CU9									7/19/2018		https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4341265
-- 14.0.3035.2		CU9 + Security Update				8/13/2018		https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=57263
-- 14.0.3037.1		CU10								8/27/2018		https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4342123/cumulative-update-10-for-sql-server-2017		
		
															

-- How to determine the version, edition and update level of SQL Server and its components 
-- https://bit.ly/2oAjKgW	

-- SQL Server 2017 build versions
-- https://bit.ly/2FLY88I

-- Performance and Stability Fixes in SQL Server 2017 CU Builds
-- https://bit.ly/2GV3CNM

-- What's New in SQL Server 2017 (Database Engine)
-- https://bit.ly/2HjSeyQ

-- What's New in SQL Server 2017
-- https://bit.ly/2saQ4Yh

-- Announcing the Modern Servicing Model for SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2xHnh0l

-- SQL Server Service Packs are discontinued starting from SQL Server 2017 
-- https://bit.ly/2GTkbgt 

-- Update Center for Microsoft SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2pZptuQ

-- Download SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS)
-- https://bit.ly/1OcupT9

-- Download and install Microsoft SQL Operations Studio 
-- https://bit.ly/2vgke1A



-- Get socket, physical core and logical core count from the SQL Server Error log. (Query 2) (Core Counts)
-- This query might take a few seconds depending on the size of your error log
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'detected', N'socket';
------

-- This can help you determine the exact core counts used by SQL Server and whether HT is enabled or not
-- It can also help you confirm your SQL Server licensing model
-- Be on the lookout for this message "using 40 logical processors based on SQL Server licensing" 
-- (when you have more than 40 logical cores) which means grandfathered Server/CAL licensing
-- This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was last started



-- Get selected server properties (Query 3) (Server Properties)
SELECT SERVERPROPERTY('MachineName') AS [MachineName], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ServerName') AS [ServerName],  
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceName') AS [Instance], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsClustered') AS [IsClustered], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS') AS [ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS], 
SERVERPROPERTY('Edition') AS [Edition], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductLevel') AS [ProductLevel],				-- What servicing branch (RTM/SP/CU)
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductUpdateLevel') AS [ProductUpdateLevel],	-- Within a servicing branch, what CU# is applied
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion') AS [ProductVersion],
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductMajorVersion') AS [ProductMajorVersion], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductMinorVersion') AS [ProductMinorVersion], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductBuild') AS [ProductBuild], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductBuildType') AS [ProductBuildType],			  -- Is this a GDR or OD hotfix (NULL if on a CU build)
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductUpdateReference') AS [ProductUpdateReference], -- KB article number that is applicable for this build
SERVERPROPERTY('ProcessID') AS [ProcessID],
SERVERPROPERTY('Collation') AS [Collation], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsFullTextInstalled') AS [IsFullTextInstalled], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsIntegratedSecurityOnly') AS [IsIntegratedSecurityOnly],
SERVERPROPERTY('FilestreamConfiguredLevel') AS [FilestreamConfiguredLevel],
SERVERPROPERTY('IsHadrEnabled') AS [IsHadrEnabled], 
SERVERPROPERTY('HadrManagerStatus') AS [HadrManagerStatus],
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceDefaultDataPath') AS [InstanceDefaultDataPath],
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceDefaultLogPath') AS [InstanceDefaultLogPath],
SERVERPROPERTY('BuildClrVersion') AS [Build CLR Version],
SERVERPROPERTY('IsXTPSupported') AS [IsXTPSupported],
SERVERPROPERTY('IsPolybaseInstalled') AS [IsPolybaseInstalled],				-- New for SQL Server 2016
SERVERPROPERTY('IsAdvancedAnalyticsInstalled') AS [IsRServicesInstalled];	-- New for SQL Server 2016
------

-- This gives you a lot of useful information about your instance of SQL Server,
-- such as the ProcessID for SQL Server and your collation
-- Note: Some columns will be NULL on older SQL Server builds

-- SERVERPROPERTY (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2eeaXeI



-- Get instance-level configuration values for instance  (Query 4) (Configuration Values)
SELECT name, value, value_in_use, minimum, maximum, [description], is_dynamic, is_advanced
FROM sys.configurations WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Focus on these settings:
-- automatic soft-NUMA disabled (should be 0 in most cases)
-- backup checksum default (should be 1)
-- backup compression default (should be 1 in most cases)
-- clr enabled (only enable if it is needed)
-- cost threshold for parallelism (depends on your workload)
-- lightweight pooling (should be zero)
-- max degree of parallelism (depends on your workload and hardware)
-- max server memory (MB) (set to an appropriate value, not the default)
-- optimize for ad hoc workloads (should be 1)
-- priority boost (should be zero)
-- remote admin connections (should be 1)

-- New configuration options for SQL Server 2017
-- clr strict security is new in SQL Server 2017, and is enabled by default

-- sys.configurations (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2HsyDZI


-- Returns a list of all global trace flags that are enabled (Query 5) (Global Trace Flags)
DBCC TRACESTATUS (-1);
------

-- If no global trace flags are enabled, no results will be returned.
-- It is very useful to know what global trace flags are currently enabled as part of the diagnostic process.

-- Common trace flags that should be enabled in most cases
-- TF 3226 - Supresses logging of successful database backup messages to the SQL Server Error Log
--           https://bit.ly/2p6MTjS  

-- TF 6534 - Enables use of native code to improve performance with spatial data
--           https://bit.ly/2HrQUpU         

-- The behavior of TF 1117, 1118 are enabled for tempdb in SQL Server 2016 by default
-- SQL 2016 � It Just Runs Faster: -T1117 and -T1118 changes for TEMPDB and user databases
-- https://bit.ly/2lbNWxK           

-- The behavior of TF 2371 is enabled by default in SQL Server 2016 and newer (in compat level 130 and higher)

-- DBCC TRACEON - Trace Flags (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2FuSvPg





-- Returns status of instant file initialization (Query 6) (IFI Status)
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'Database Instant File Initialization';
------

-- Lets you determine whether Instant File Initialization (IFI) is enabled for the instance
-- This should be enabled in the vast majority of cases
-- SQL Server 2016 and newer lets you enable this during the SQL server installation process

-- Database Instant File Initialization
-- https://bit.ly/2nTX74y

-- Misconceptions around instant file initialization
-- https://bit.ly/2oBSKgZ



-- SQL Server Process Address space info  (Query 7) (Process Memory)
-- (shows whether locked pages is enabled, among other things)
SELECT physical_memory_in_use_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Memory Usage (MB)],
	   locked_page_allocations_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Locked Pages Allocation (MB)],
       large_page_allocations_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Large Pages Allocation (MB)], 
	   page_fault_count, memory_utilization_percentage, available_commit_limit_kb, 
	   process_physical_memory_low, process_virtual_memory_low
FROM sys.dm_os_process_memory WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You want to see 0 for process_physical_memory_low
-- You want to see 0 for process_virtual_memory_low
-- This indicates that you are not under internal memory pressure
-- If locked_page_allocations_kb > 0, then LPIM is enabled

-- How to enable the "locked pages" feature in SQL Server 2012
-- https://bit.ly/2F5UjOA

-- Memory Management Architecture Guide
-- https://bit.ly/2JKkadC 



-- SQL Server Services information (Query 8) (SQL Server Services Info)
SELECT servicename, process_id, startup_type_desc, status_desc, 
last_startup_time, service_account, is_clustered, cluster_nodename, [filename], 
instant_file_initialization_enabled
FROM sys.dm_server_services WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you the account being used for the SQL Server Service and the SQL Agent Service
-- Shows the process_id, when they were last started, and their current status
-- Also shows whether you are running on a failover cluster instance, and what node you are running on
-- Also shows whether IFI is enabled

-- sys.dm_server_services (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2oKa1Un


-- Last backup information by database  (Query 9) (Last Backup By Database)
SELECT ISNULL(d.[name], bs.[database_name]) AS [Database], d.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model], 
       d.log_reuse_wait_desc AS [Log Reuse Wait Desc],
    MAX(CASE WHEN [type] = 'D' THEN bs.backup_finish_date ELSE NULL END) AS [Last Full Backup],
    MAX(CASE WHEN [type] = 'I' THEN bs.backup_finish_date ELSE NULL END) AS [Last Differential Backup],
    MAX(CASE WHEN [type] = 'L' THEN bs.backup_finish_date ELSE NULL END) AS [Last Log Backup]
FROM sys.databases AS d WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.backupset AS bs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON bs.[database_name] = d.[name] 
AND bs.backup_finish_date > GETDATE()- 30
WHERE d.name <> N'tempdb'
GROUP BY ISNULL(d.[name], bs.[database_name]), d.recovery_model_desc, d.log_reuse_wait_desc, d.[name] 
ORDER BY d.recovery_model_desc, d.[name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you spot runaway transaction logs and other issues with your backup schedule


-- Get SQL Server Agent jobs and Category information (Query 10) (SQL Server Agent Jobs)
SELECT sj.name AS [Job Name], sj.[description] AS [Job Description], SUSER_SNAME(sj.owner_sid) AS [Job Owner],
sj.date_created AS [Date Created], sj.[enabled] AS [Job Enabled], 
sj.notify_email_operator_id, sj.notify_level_email, sc.name AS [CategoryName],
s.[enabled] AS [Sched Enabled], js.next_run_date, js.next_run_time
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobs AS sj WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.syscategories AS sc WITH (NOLOCK)
ON sj.category_id = sc.category_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobschedules AS js WITH (NOLOCK)
ON sj.job_id = js.job_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysschedules AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON js.schedule_id = s.schedule_id
ORDER BY sj.name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some basic information about your SQL Server Agent jobs, who owns them and how they are configured
-- Look for Agent jobs that are not owned by sa
-- Look for jobs that have a notify_email_operator_id set to 0 (meaning no operator)
-- Look for jobs that have a notify_level_email set to 0 (meaning no e-mail is ever sent)
--
-- MSDN sysjobs documentation
-- https://bit.ly/2paDEOP 

-- SQL Server Maintenance Solution
-- https://bit.ly/1pgchQu  


-- Get SQL Server Agent Alert Information (Query 11) (SQL Server Agent Alerts)
SELECT name, event_source, message_id, severity, [enabled], has_notification, 
       delay_between_responses, occurrence_count, last_occurrence_date, last_occurrence_time
FROM msdb.dbo.sysalerts WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some basic information about your SQL Server Agent Alerts 
-- (which are different from SQL Server Agent jobs)
-- Read more about Agent Alerts here: https://bit.ly/2Giz0Xf 



-- Host information (Query 12) (Host Info)
SELECT host_platform, host_distribution, host_release, 
       host_service_pack_level, host_sku, os_language_version 
FROM sys.dm_os_host_info WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE); 
------

-- host_release codes (only valid for Windows)
-- 10.0 is either Windows 10 or Windows Server 2016
-- 6.3 is either Windows 8.1 or Windows Server 2012 R2 
-- 6.2 is either Windows 8 or Windows Server 2012


-- host_sku codes (only valid for Windows)
-- 4 is Enterprise Edition
-- 7 is Standard Server Edition
-- 8 is Datacenter Server Edition
-- 10 is Enterprise Server Edition
-- 48 is Professional Edition
-- 161 is Pro for Workstations

-- 1033 for os_language_version is US-English

-- SQL Server 2017 requires Windows Server 2012 or newer

-- Hardware and Software Requirements for Installing SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2y3ka5L

-- Using SQL Server in Windows 8 and later versions of Windows operating system
-- https://bit.ly/2F7Ax0P 


-- SQL Server NUMA Node information  (Query 13) (SQL Server NUMA Info)
SELECT node_id, node_state_desc, memory_node_id, processor_group, cpu_count, online_scheduler_count, 
       idle_scheduler_count, active_worker_count, avg_load_balance, resource_monitor_state
FROM sys.dm_os_nodes WITH (NOLOCK) 
WHERE node_state_desc <> N'ONLINE DAC' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some useful information about the composition and relative load on your NUMA nodes
-- You want to see an equal number of schedulers on each NUMA node
-- Watch out if SQL Server 2017 Standard Edition has been installed 
-- on a physical or virtual machine with more than four sockets or more than 24 physical cores

-- sys.dm_os_nodes (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pn5Mw8

-- Balancing Your Available SQL Server Core Licenses Evenly Across NUMA Nodes
-- https://bit.ly/2vfC4Rq



-- Good basic information about OS memory amounts and state  (Query 14) (System Memory)
SELECT total_physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Physical Memory (MB)], 
       available_physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Available Memory (MB)], 
       total_page_file_kb/1024 AS [Total Page File (MB)], 
	   available_page_file_kb/1024 AS [Available Page File (MB)], 
	   system_cache_kb/1024 AS [System Cache (MB)],
       system_memory_state_desc AS [System Memory State]
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_memory WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You want to see "Available physical memory is high" for System Memory State
-- This indicates that you are not under external memory pressure

-- Possible System Memory State values:
-- Available physical memory is high
-- Physical memory usage is steady
-- Available physical memory is low
-- Available physical memory is running low
-- Physical memory state is transitioning

-- sys.dm_os_sys_memory (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pcV0xq



-- You can skip the next two queries if you know you don't have a clustered instance


-- Get information about your cluster nodes and their status  (Query 15) (Cluster Node Properties)
-- (if your database server is in a failover cluster)
SELECT NodeName, status_description, is_current_owner
FROM sys.dm_os_cluster_nodes WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Knowing which node owns the cluster resources is critical
-- Especially when you are installing Windows or SQL Server updates
-- You will see no results if your instance is not clustered

-- Recommended hotfixes and updates for Windows Server 2012 R2-based failover clusters
-- https://bit.ly/1z5BfCw


-- Get information about any AlwaysOn AG cluster this instance is a part of (Query 16) (AlwaysOn AG Cluster)
SELECT cluster_name, quorum_type_desc, quorum_state_desc
FROM sys.dm_hadr_cluster WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You will see no results if your instance is not using AlwaysOn AGs


-- Good overview of AG health and status (Query 17) (AlwaysOn AG Status)
SELECT ag.name AS [AG Name], ar.replica_server_name, ar.availability_mode_desc, adc.[database_name], 
       drs.is_local, drs.is_primary_replica, drs.synchronization_state_desc, drs.is_commit_participant, 
	   drs.synchronization_health_desc, drs.recovery_lsn, drs.truncation_lsn, drs.last_sent_lsn, 
	   drs.last_sent_time, drs.last_received_lsn, drs.last_received_time, drs.last_hardened_lsn, 
	   drs.last_hardened_time, drs.last_redone_lsn, drs.last_redone_time, drs.log_send_queue_size, 
	   drs.log_send_rate, drs.redo_queue_size, drs.redo_rate, drs.filestream_send_rate, 
	   drs.end_of_log_lsn, drs.last_commit_lsn, drs.last_commit_time, drs.database_state_desc 
FROM sys.dm_hadr_database_replica_states AS drs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.availability_databases_cluster AS adc WITH (NOLOCK)
ON drs.group_id = adc.group_id 
AND drs.group_database_id = adc.group_database_id
INNER JOIN sys.availability_groups AS ag WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ag.group_id = drs.group_id
INNER JOIN sys.availability_replicas AS ar WITH (NOLOCK)
ON drs.group_id = ar.group_id 
AND drs.replica_id = ar.replica_id
ORDER BY ag.name, ar.replica_server_name, adc.[database_name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);

-- You will see no results if your instance is not using AlwaysOn AGs

-- SQL Server 2016 � It Just Runs Faster: Always On Availability Groups Turbocharged
-- https://bit.ly/2dn1H6r


-- Hardware information from SQL Server 2017  (Query 18) (Hardware Info)
SELECT cpu_count AS [Logical CPU Count], scheduler_count, 
       (socket_count * cores_per_socket) AS [Physical Core Count], 
       socket_count AS [Socket Count], cores_per_socket, numa_node_count,
       physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Physical Memory (MB)], 
       max_workers_count AS [Max Workers Count], 
	   affinity_type_desc AS [Affinity Type], 
       sqlserver_start_time AS [SQL Server Start Time], 
	   virtual_machine_type_desc AS [Virtual Machine Type], 
       softnuma_configuration_desc AS [Soft NUMA Configuration], 
	   sql_memory_model_desc, process_physical_affinity -- New in SQL Server 2017
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some good basic hardware information about your database server
-- Note: virtual_machine_type_desc of HYPERVISOR does not automatically mean you are running SQL Server inside of a VM
-- It merely indicates that you have a hypervisor running on your host

-- sys.dm_os_sys_info (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pczOYs

-- Soft NUMA configuration was a new column for SQL Server 2016
-- OFF = Soft-NUMA feature is OFF
-- ON = SQL Server automatically determines the NUMA node sizes for Soft-NUMA
-- MANUAL = Manually configured soft-NUMA

-- Configure SQL Server to Use Soft-NUMA (SQL Server)
-- https://bit.ly/2HTpKJt

-- sql_memory_model_desc values (Added in SQL Server 2016 SP1)
-- CONVENTIONAL
-- LOCK_PAGES
-- LARGE_PAGES
   

-- Get System Manufacturer and model number from SQL Server Error log (Query 19) (System Manufacturer)
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'Manufacturer';
------ 

-- This can help you determine the capabilities and capacities of your database server
-- Can also be used to confirm if you are running in a VM
-- This query might take a few seconds if you have not recycled your error log recently
-- This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was started


-- Get BIOS date from Windows Registry (Query 20) (BIOS Date)
EXEC sys.xp_instance_regread N'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE', N'HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\BIOS', N'BiosReleaseDate';
------

-- Helps you understand whether the main system BIOS is up to date, and the possible age of the hardware
-- Not as useful for virtualization


-- Get processor description from Windows Registry  (Query 21) (Processor Description)
EXEC sys.xp_instance_regread N'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE', N'HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\CentralProcessor\0', N'ProcessorNameString';
------

-- Gives you the model number and rated clock speed of your processor(s)
-- Your processors may be running at less than the rated clock speed due
-- to the Windows Power Plan or hardware power management

-- You can use CPU-Z to get your actual CPU core speed and a lot of other useful information
-- https://bit.ly/QhR6xF

-- You can learn more about processor selection for SQL Server by following this link
-- https://bit.ly/2F3aVlP



-- See if buffer pool extension (BPE) is enabled (Query 22) (BPE Configuration)
SELECT [path], state_description, current_size_in_kb, 
CAST(current_size_in_kb/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10,2)) AS [Size (GB)]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_pool_extension_configuration WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- BPE is available in both Standard Edition and Enterprise Edition
-- It is a more interesting feature for Standard Edition

-- Buffer Pool Extension to SSDs in SQL Server 2014
-- https://bit.ly/1bm08m8

-- Buffer Pool Extension
-- https://bit.ly/2oBuieO



-- Look at buffer descriptors to see BPE usage by database (Query 23) (BPE Usage) 
SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name], COUNT(page_id) AS [Page Count],
CAST(COUNT(*)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Buffer size(MB)], 
AVG(read_microsec) AS [Avg Read Time (microseconds)]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE database_id <> 32767
AND is_in_bpool_extension = 1
GROUP BY DB_NAME(database_id) 
ORDER BY [Buffer size(MB)] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You will see no results if BPE is not enabled or if there is no BPE usage


-- Get information on location, time and size of any memory dumps from SQL Server  (Query 24) (Memory Dump Info)
SELECT [filename], creation_time, size_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS [Size (MB)]
FROM sys.dm_server_memory_dumps WITH (NOLOCK) 
ORDER BY creation_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This will not return any rows if you have 
-- not had any memory dumps (which is a good thing)

-- sys.dm_server_memory_dumps (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2elwWll



-- Look at Suspect Pages table (Query 25) (Suspect Pages)
SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name], [file_id], page_id, 
       event_type, error_count, last_update_date 
FROM msdb.dbo.suspect_pages WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY database_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- event_type value descriptions
-- 1 = 823 error caused by an operating system CRC error
--     or 824 error other than a bad checksum or a torn page (for example, a bad page ID)
-- 2 = Bad checksum
-- 3 = Torn page
-- 4 = Restored (The page was restored after it was marked bad)
-- 5 = Repaired (DBCC repaired the page)
-- 7 = Deallocated by DBCC

-- Ideally, this query returns no results. The table is limited to 1000 rows.
-- If you do get results here, you should do further investigation to determine the root cause

-- Manage the suspect_pages Table
-- https://bit.ly/2Fvr1c9


-- Get number of data files in tempdb database (Query 26) (TempDB Data Files)
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'The tempdb database has';
------

-- Get the number of data files in the tempdb database
-- 4-8 data files that are all the same size is a good starting point
-- This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was last started


-- File names and paths for all user and system databases on instance  (Query 27) (Database Filenames and Paths)
SELECT DB_NAME([database_id]) AS [Database Name], 
       [file_id], [name], physical_name, [type_desc], state_desc,
	   is_percent_growth, growth,
	   CONVERT(bigint, growth/128.0) AS [Growth in MB], 
       CONVERT(bigint, size/128.0) AS [Total Size in MB]
FROM sys.master_files WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY DB_NAME([database_id]), [file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Things to look at:
-- Are data files and log files on different drives?
-- Is everything on the C: drive?
-- Is tempdb on dedicated drives?
-- Is there only one tempdb data file?
-- Are all of the tempdb data files the same size?
-- Are there multiple data files for user databases?
-- Is percent growth enabled for any files (which is bad)?


-- Drive information for all fixed drives visible to the operating system (Query 28) (Fixed Drives)
SELECT fixed_drive_path, drive_type_desc, 
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), free_space_in_bytes/1073741824.0) AS [Available Space (GB)]
FROM sys.dm_os_enumerate_fixed_drives WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This shows all of your fixed drives, not just LUNs with SQL Server database files



-- Volume info for all LUNS that have database files on the current instance (Query 29) (Volume Info)
SELECT DISTINCT vs.volume_mount_point, vs.file_system_type, vs.logical_volume_name, 
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.total_bytes/1073741824.0) AS [Total Size (GB)],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.available_bytes/1073741824.0) AS [Available Size (GB)],  
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.available_bytes * 1. / vs.total_bytes * 100.) AS [Space Free %],
vs.supports_compression, vs.is_compressed, 
vs.supports_sparse_files, vs.supports_alternate_streams
FROM sys.master_files AS f WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_os_volume_stats(f.database_id, f.[file_id]) AS vs 
ORDER BY vs.volume_mount_point OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Shows you the total and free space on the LUNs where you have database files
-- Being low on free space can negatively affect performance

-- sys.dm_os_volume_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2oBPNNr



-- Drive level latency information (Query 30) (Drive Level Latency)
-- Based on code from Jimmy May
SELECT tab.[Drive], tab.volume_mount_point AS [Volume Mount Point], 
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_reads = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall_read_ms/num_of_reads) 
	END AS [Read Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_writes = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall_write_ms/num_of_writes) 
	END AS [Write Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN (num_of_reads = 0 AND num_of_writes = 0) THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall/(num_of_reads + num_of_writes)) 
	END AS [Overall Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_reads = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (num_of_bytes_read/num_of_reads) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Read],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_writes = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (num_of_bytes_written/num_of_writes) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Write],
	CASE 
		WHEN (num_of_reads = 0 AND num_of_writes = 0) THEN 0 
		ELSE ((num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/(num_of_reads + num_of_writes)) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Transfer]
FROM (SELECT LEFT(UPPER(mf.physical_name), 2) AS Drive, SUM(num_of_reads) AS num_of_reads,
	         SUM(io_stall_read_ms) AS io_stall_read_ms, SUM(num_of_writes) AS num_of_writes,
	         SUM(io_stall_write_ms) AS io_stall_write_ms, SUM(num_of_bytes_read) AS num_of_bytes_read,
	         SUM(num_of_bytes_written) AS num_of_bytes_written, SUM(io_stall) AS io_stall, vs.volume_mount_point 
      FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS vfs
      INNER JOIN sys.master_files AS mf WITH (NOLOCK)
      ON vfs.database_id = mf.database_id AND vfs.file_id = mf.file_id
	  CROSS APPLY sys.dm_os_volume_stats(mf.database_id, mf.[file_id]) AS vs 
      GROUP BY LEFT(UPPER(mf.physical_name), 2), vs.volume_mount_point) AS tab
ORDER BY [Overall Latency] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Shows you the drive-level latency for reads and writes, in milliseconds
-- Latency above 30-40ms is usually a problem
-- These latency numbers include all file activity against all SQL Server 
-- database files on each drive since SQL Server was last started


-- Calculates average stalls per read, per write, and per total input/output for each database file  (Query 31) (IO Stalls by File)
SELECT DB_NAME(fs.database_id) AS [Database Name], CAST(fs.io_stall_read_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_read_stall_ms],
CAST(fs.io_stall_write_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_write_stall_ms],
CAST((fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms)/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_io_stall_ms],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), mf.size/128.0) AS [File Size (MB)], mf.physical_name, mf.type_desc, fs.io_stall_read_ms, fs.num_of_reads, 
fs.io_stall_write_ms, fs.num_of_writes, fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms AS [io_stalls], fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes AS [total_io],
io_stall_queued_read_ms AS [Resource Governor Total Read IO Latency (ms)], io_stall_queued_write_ms AS [Resource Governor Total Write IO Latency (ms)] 
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(null,null) AS fs
INNER JOIN sys.master_files AS mf WITH (NOLOCK)
ON fs.database_id = mf.database_id
AND fs.[file_id] = mf.[file_id]
ORDER BY avg_io_stall_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database files on the entire instance have the most I/O bottlenecks
-- This can help you decide whether certain LUNs are overloaded and whether you might
-- want to move some files to a different location or perhaps improve your I/O performance
-- These latency numbers include all file activity against each SQL Server 
-- database file since SQL Server was last started


-- Look for I/O requests taking longer than 15 seconds in the six most recent SQL Server Error Logs (Query 32) (IO Warnings)
CREATE TABLE #IOWarningResults(LogDate datetime, ProcessInfo sysname, LogText nvarchar(1000));

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 1, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 2, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 3, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 4, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 5, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

SELECT LogDate, ProcessInfo, LogText
FROM #IOWarningResults
ORDER BY LogDate DESC;

DROP TABLE #IOWarningResults;
------  

-- Finding 15 second I/O warnings in the SQL Server Error Log is useful evidence of
-- poor I/O performance (which might have many different causes)
-- Look to see if you see any patterns in the results (same files, same drives, same time of day, etc.)

-- Diagnostics in SQL Server help detect stalled and stuck I/O operations
-- https://bit.ly/2qtaw73



-- Recovery model, log reuse wait description, log file size, log usage size  (Query 33) (Database Properties)
-- and compatibility level for all databases on instance
SELECT db.[name] AS [Database Name], SUSER_SNAME(db.owner_sid) AS [Database Owner], db.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model], 
db.state_desc, db.containment_desc, db.log_reuse_wait_desc AS [Log Reuse Wait Description], 
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), ls.cntr_value/1024.0) AS [Log Size (MB)], CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), lu.cntr_value/1024.0) AS [Log Used (MB)],
CAST(CAST(lu.cntr_value AS FLOAT) / CAST(ls.cntr_value AS FLOAT)AS DECIMAL(18,2)) * 100 AS [Log Used %], 
db.[compatibility_level] AS [DB Compatibility Level], 
db.is_mixed_page_allocation_on, db.page_verify_option_desc AS [Page Verify Option], 
db.is_auto_create_stats_on, db.is_auto_update_stats_on, db.is_auto_update_stats_async_on, db.is_parameterization_forced, 
db.snapshot_isolation_state_desc, db.is_read_committed_snapshot_on, db.is_auto_close_on, db.is_auto_shrink_on, 
db.target_recovery_time_in_seconds, db.is_cdc_enabled, db.is_published, db.is_distributor,
db.group_database_id, db.replica_id,db.is_memory_optimized_elevate_to_snapshot_on, 
db.delayed_durability_desc, db.is_auto_create_stats_incremental_on,
db.is_query_store_on, db.is_sync_with_backup, db.is_temporal_history_retention_enabled,
db.is_supplemental_logging_enabled, db.is_remote_data_archive_enabled,
db.is_encrypted, de.encryption_state, de.percent_complete, de.key_algorithm, de.key_length      
FROM sys.databases AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS lu WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.name = lu.instance_name
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS ls WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.name = ls.instance_name
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_database_encryption_keys AS de WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.database_id = de.database_id
WHERE lu.counter_name LIKE N'Log File(s) Used Size (KB)%' 
AND ls.counter_name LIKE N'Log File(s) Size (KB)%'
AND ls.cntr_value > 0 
ORDER BY db.[name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Things to look at:
-- How many databases are on the instance?
-- What recovery models are they using?
-- What is the log reuse wait description?
-- How full are the transaction logs?
-- What compatibility level are the databases on? 
-- What is the Page Verify Option? (should be CHECKSUM)
-- Is Auto Update Statistics Asynchronously enabled?
-- Is Delayed Durability enabled
-- Make sure auto_shrink and auto_close are not enabled!

-- is_mixed_page_allocation_on is a new property for SQL Server 2016. Equivalent to TF 1118 for a user database
-- SQL Server 2016: Changes in default behavior for autogrow and allocations for tempdb and user databases
-- https://bit.ly/2evRZSR

-- A non-zero value for target_recovery_time_in_seconds means that indirect checkpoint is enabled 
-- If the setting has a zero value it indicates that automatic checkpoint is enabled

-- Changes in SQL Server 2016 Checkpoint Behavior
-- https://bit.ly/2pdggk3


-- Missing Indexes for all databases by Index Advantage  (Query 34) (Missing Indexes All Databases)
SELECT CONVERT(decimal(18,2), user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01)) AS [index_advantage],
FORMAT(migs.last_user_seek, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss') AS [last_user_seek], 
mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement]) AS [missing_indexes_for_table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement], equality_columns) AS [similar_missing_indexes_for_table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, 
CONVERT(decimal(18,2), migs.avg_total_user_cost) AS [avg_total_user_cost], migs.avg_user_impact 
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Getting missing index information for all of the databases on the instance is very useful
-- Look at last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
-- Also look at avg_user_impact and avg_total_user_cost to help determine importance
-- SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware
-- Do not just blindly add indexes that show up from this query!!!

-- SQL Server Index Design Guide
-- https://bit.ly/2qtZr4N



-- Get VLF Counts for all databases on the instance (Query 35) (VLF Counts)
SELECT�[name] AS [Database Name],�[VLF Count] 
FROM�sys.databases�AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY�(SELECT�file_id, COUNT(*)�AS [VLF Count]�
			 FROM sys.dm_db_log_info(db.database_id) 
����������   GROUP BY�file_id)�AS li
ORDER BY [VLF Count] DESC  OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- High VLF counts can affect write performance to the log file
-- and they can make full database restores and crash recovery take much longer
-- Try to keep your VLF counts under 200 in most cases (depending on log file size)

-- Important change to VLF creation algorithm in SQL Server 2014
-- https://bit.ly/2Hsjbg4

-- SQL Server Transaction Log Architecture and Management Guide
-- https://bit.ly/2JjmQRZ



-- Get CPU utilization by database (Query 36) (CPU Usage by Database)
WITH DB_CPU_Stats
AS
(SELECT pa.DatabaseID, DB_Name(pa.DatabaseID) AS [Database Name], SUM(qs.total_worker_time/1000) AS [CPU_Time_Ms]
 FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
 CROSS APPLY (SELECT CONVERT(int, value) AS [DatabaseID] 
              FROM sys.dm_exec_plan_attributes(qs.plan_handle)
              WHERE attribute = N'dbid') AS pa
 GROUP BY DatabaseID)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY [CPU_Time_Ms] DESC) AS [CPU Rank],
       [Database Name], [CPU_Time_Ms] AS [CPU Time (ms)], 
       CAST([CPU_Time_Ms] * 1.0 / SUM([CPU_Time_Ms]) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5, 2)) AS [CPU Percent]
FROM DB_CPU_Stats
WHERE DatabaseID <> 32767 -- ResourceDB
ORDER BY [CPU Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database is using the most CPU resources on the instance


-- Get I/O utilization by database (Query 37) (IO Usage By Database)
WITH Aggregate_IO_Statistics
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(SUM(num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/1048576 AS DECIMAL(12, 2)) AS io_in_mb
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS [DM_IO_STATS]
GROUP BY database_id)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY io_in_mb DESC) AS [I/O Rank], [Database Name], io_in_mb AS [Total I/O (MB)],
       CAST(io_in_mb/ SUM(io_in_mb) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [I/O Percent]
FROM Aggregate_IO_Statistics
ORDER BY [I/O Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database is using the most I/O resources on the instance


-- Get total buffer usage by database for current instance  (Query 38) (Total Buffer Usage by Database)
-- This make take some time to run on a busy instance
WITH AggregateBufferPoolUsage
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(COUNT(*) * 8/1024.0 AS DECIMAL (10,2))  AS [CachedSize]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE database_id <> 32767 -- ResourceDB
GROUP BY DB_NAME(database_id))
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY CachedSize DESC) AS [Buffer Pool Rank], [Database Name], CachedSize AS [Cached Size (MB)],
       CAST(CachedSize / SUM(CachedSize) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [Buffer Pool Percent]
FROM AggregateBufferPoolUsage
ORDER BY [Buffer Pool Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you how much memory (in the buffer pool) 
-- is being used by each database on the instance


-- Get tempdb version store space usage by database (Query 39) (Version Store Space Usage)
SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
       reserved_page_count AS [Version Store Reserved Page Count], 
	   reserved_space_kb/1024 AS [Version Store Reserved Space (MB)] 
FROM sys.dm_tran_version_store_space_usage WITH (NOLOCK) 
ORDER BY reserved_space_kb/1024 DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------  

-- sys.dm_tran_version_store_space_usage (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2vh3Bmk




-- Clear Wait Stats with this command
-- DBCC SQLPERF('sys.dm_os_wait_stats', CLEAR);

-- Isolate top waits for server instance since last restart or wait statistics clear  (Query 40) (Top Waits)
WITH [Waits] 
AS (SELECT wait_type, wait_time_ms/ 1000.0 AS [WaitS],
          (wait_time_ms - signal_wait_time_ms) / 1000.0 AS [ResourceS],
           signal_wait_time_ms / 1000.0 AS [SignalS],
           waiting_tasks_count AS [WaitCount],
           100.0 *  wait_time_ms / SUM (wait_time_ms) OVER() AS [Percentage],
           ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY wait_time_ms DESC) AS [RowNum]
    FROM sys.dm_os_wait_stats WITH (NOLOCK)
    WHERE [wait_type] NOT IN (
        N'BROKER_EVENTHANDLER', N'BROKER_RECEIVE_WAITFOR', N'BROKER_TASK_STOP',
		N'BROKER_TO_FLUSH', N'BROKER_TRANSMITTER', N'CHECKPOINT_QUEUE',
        N'CHKPT', N'CLR_AUTO_EVENT', N'CLR_MANUAL_EVENT', N'CLR_SEMAPHORE', N'CXCONSUMER',
        N'DBMIRROR_DBM_EVENT', N'DBMIRROR_EVENTS_QUEUE', N'DBMIRROR_WORKER_QUEUE',
		N'DBMIRRORING_CMD', N'DIRTY_PAGE_POLL', N'DISPATCHER_QUEUE_SEMAPHORE',
        N'EXECSYNC', N'FSAGENT', N'FT_IFTS_SCHEDULER_IDLE_WAIT', N'FT_IFTSHC_MUTEX',
        N'HADR_CLUSAPI_CALL', N'HADR_FILESTREAM_IOMGR_IOCOMPLETION', N'HADR_LOGCAPTURE_WAIT', 
		N'HADR_NOTIFICATION_DEQUEUE', N'HADR_TIMER_TASK', N'HADR_WORK_QUEUE',
        N'KSOURCE_WAKEUP', N'LAZYWRITER_SLEEP', N'LOGMGR_QUEUE', 
		N'MEMORY_ALLOCATION_EXT', N'ONDEMAND_TASK_QUEUE',
		N'PARALLEL_REDO_DRAIN_WORKER', N'PARALLEL_REDO_LOG_CACHE', N'PARALLEL_REDO_TRAN_LIST',
		N'PARALLEL_REDO_WORKER_SYNC', N'PARALLEL_REDO_WORKER_WAIT_WORK',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_HADR_LEASE_MECHANISM', N'PREEMPTIVE_SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_LIBRARYOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_COMOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_CRYPTOPS',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_PIPEOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_AUTHENTICATIONOPS',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_GENERICOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_VERIFYTRUST',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_FILEOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_DEVICEOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_QUERYREGISTRY',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_WRITEFILE',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_CALLBACKEXECUTE', N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_DISPATCHER',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_GETTARGETSTATE', N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_SESSIONCOMMIT',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_TARGETINIT', N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_TARGETFINALIZE',
        N'PWAIT_ALL_COMPONENTS_INITIALIZED', N'PWAIT_DIRECTLOGCONSUMER_GETNEXT',
		N'QDS_PERSIST_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP',
		N'QDS_ASYNC_QUEUE',
        N'QDS_CLEANUP_STALE_QUERIES_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP', N'REQUEST_FOR_DEADLOCK_SEARCH',
		N'RESOURCE_QUEUE', N'SERVER_IDLE_CHECK', N'SLEEP_BPOOL_FLUSH', N'SLEEP_DBSTARTUP',
		N'SLEEP_DCOMSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_MASTERDBREADY', N'SLEEP_MASTERMDREADY',
        N'SLEEP_MASTERUPGRADED', N'SLEEP_MSDBSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_SYSTEMTASK', N'SLEEP_TASK',
        N'SLEEP_TEMPDBSTARTUP', N'SNI_HTTP_ACCEPT', N'SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS_SLEEP',
		N'SQLTRACE_BUFFER_FLUSH', N'SQLTRACE_INCREMENTAL_FLUSH_SLEEP', N'SQLTRACE_WAIT_ENTRIES',
		N'WAIT_FOR_RESULTS', N'WAITFOR', N'WAITFOR_TASKSHUTDOWN', N'WAIT_XTP_HOST_WAIT',
		N'WAIT_XTP_OFFLINE_CKPT_NEW_LOG', N'WAIT_XTP_CKPT_CLOSE', N'WAIT_XTP_RECOVERY',
		N'XE_BUFFERMGR_ALLPROCESSED_EVENT', N'XE_DISPATCHER_JOIN',
        N'XE_DISPATCHER_WAIT', N'XE_LIVE_TARGET_TVF', N'XE_TIMER_EVENT')
    AND waiting_tasks_count > 0)
SELECT
    MAX (W1.wait_type) AS [WaitType],
	CAST (MAX (W1.Percentage) AS DECIMAL (5,2)) AS [Wait Percentage],
	CAST ((MAX (W1.WaitS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgWait_Sec],
    CAST ((MAX (W1.ResourceS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgRes_Sec],
    CAST ((MAX (W1.SignalS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgSig_Sec], 
    CAST (MAX (W1.WaitS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Wait_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.ResourceS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Resource_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.SignalS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Signal_Sec],
    MAX (W1.WaitCount) AS [Wait Count],
	CAST (N'https://www.sqlskills.com/help/waits/' + W1.wait_type AS XML) AS [Help/Info URL]
FROM Waits AS W1
INNER JOIN Waits AS W2
ON W2.RowNum <= W1.RowNum
GROUP BY W1.RowNum, W1.wait_type
HAVING SUM (W2.Percentage) - MAX (W1.Percentage) < 99 -- percentage threshold
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Cumulative wait stats are not as useful on an idle instance that is not under load or performance pressure

-- SQL Server Wait Types Library (Paul Randal)
-- https://bit.ly/2ePzYO2

-- The SQL Server Wait Type Repository
-- https://bit.ly/1afzfjC

-- Wait statistics, or please tell me where it hurts
-- https://bit.ly/2wsQHQE

-- SQL Server 2005 Performance Tuning using the Waits and Queues
-- https://bit.ly/1o2NFoF

-- sys.dm_os_wait_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2Hjq9Yl



-- Get a count of SQL connections by IP address (Query 41) (Connection Counts by IP Address)
SELECT ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name, 
COUNT(ec.session_id) AS [connection count] 
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions AS es WITH (NOLOCK) 
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_connections AS ec WITH (NOLOCK) 
ON es.session_id = ec.session_id 
GROUP BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name  
ORDER BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you figure where your database load is coming from
-- and verifies connectivity from other machines

-- Solving Connectivity errors to SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2EgzoD0



-- Get Average Task Counts (run multiple times)  (Query 42) (Avg Task Counts)
SELECT AVG(current_tasks_count) AS [Avg Task Count], 
AVG(work_queue_count) AS [Avg Work Queue Count],
AVG(runnable_tasks_count) AS [Avg Runnable Task Count],
AVG(pending_disk_io_count) AS [Avg Pending DiskIO Count]
FROM sys.dm_os_schedulers WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE scheduler_id < 255 OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Sustained values above 10 suggest further investigation in that area
-- High Avg Task Counts are often caused by blocking/deadlocking or other resource contention

-- Sustained values above 1 suggest further investigation in that area
-- High Avg Runnable Task Counts are a good sign of CPU pressure
-- High Avg Pending DiskIO Counts are a sign of disk pressure

-- How to Do Some Very Basic SQL Server Monitoring
-- https://bit.ly/2q3Btgt



-- Detect blocking (run multiple times)  (Query 43) (Detect Blocking)
SELECT t1.resource_type AS [lock type], DB_NAME(resource_database_id) AS [database],
t1.resource_associated_entity_id AS [blk object],t1.request_mode AS [lock req],  -- lock requested
t1.request_session_id AS [waiter sid], t2.wait_duration_ms AS [wait time],       -- spid of waiter  
(SELECT [text] FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r WITH (NOLOCK)                      -- get sql for waiter
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.[sql_handle]) 
WHERE r.session_id = t1.request_session_id) AS [waiter_batch],
(SELECT SUBSTRING(qt.[text],r.statement_start_offset/2, 
    (CASE WHEN r.statement_end_offset = -1 
    THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 
    ELSE r.statement_end_offset END - r.statement_start_offset)/2) 
FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.[sql_handle]) AS qt
WHERE r.session_id = t1.request_session_id) AS [waiter_stmt],					-- statement blocked
t2.blocking_session_id AS [blocker sid],										-- spid of blocker
(SELECT [text] FROM sys.sysprocesses AS p										-- get sql for blocker
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(p.[sql_handle]) 
WHERE p.spid = t2.blocking_session_id) AS [blocker_batch]
FROM sys.dm_tran_locks AS t1 WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_waiting_tasks AS t2 WITH (NOLOCK)
ON t1.lock_owner_address = t2.resource_address OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps troubleshoot blocking and deadlocking issues
-- The results will change from second to second on a busy system
-- You should run this query multiple times when you see signs of blocking



-- Get CPU Utilization History for last 256 minutes (in one minute intervals)  (Query 44) (CPU Utilization History)
DECLARE @ts_now bigint = (SELECT cpu_ticks/(cpu_ticks/ms_ticks) FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info WITH (NOLOCK)); 

SELECT TOP(256) SQLProcessUtilization AS [SQL Server Process CPU Utilization], 
               SystemIdle AS [System Idle Process], 
               100 - SystemIdle - SQLProcessUtilization AS [Other Process CPU Utilization], 
               DATEADD(ms, -1 * (@ts_now - [timestamp]), GETDATE()) AS [Event Time] 
FROM (SELECT record.value('(./Record/@id)[1]', 'int') AS record_id, 
			record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/SystemIdle)[1]', 'int') 
			AS [SystemIdle], 
			record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/ProcessUtilization)[1]', 'int') 
			AS [SQLProcessUtilization], [timestamp] 
	  FROM (SELECT [timestamp], CONVERT(xml, record) AS [record] 
			FROM sys.dm_os_ring_buffers WITH (NOLOCK)
			WHERE ring_buffer_type = N'RING_BUFFER_SCHEDULER_MONITOR' 
			AND record LIKE N'%<SystemHealth>%') AS x) AS y 
ORDER BY record_id DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at the trend over the entire period 
-- Also look at high sustained 'Other Process' CPU Utilization values
-- Note: This query sometimes gives inaccurate results (negative values)
-- on high core count (> 64 cores) systems


-- Get top total worker time queries for entire instance (Query 45) (Top Worker Time Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], 
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 255), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text],  
qs.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time], qs.min_worker_time AS [Min Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.max_worker_time AS [Max Worker Time], 
qs.min_elapsed_time AS [Min Elapsed Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time AS [Max Elapsed Time],
qs.min_logical_reads AS [Min Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.max_logical_reads AS [Max Logical Reads], 
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Helps you find the most expensive queries from a CPU perspective across the entire instance
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues



-- Page Life Expectancy (PLE) value for each NUMA node in current instance  (Query 46) (PLE by NUMA Node)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], RTRIM([object_name]) AS [Object Name], instance_name, cntr_value AS [Page Life Expectancy]
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N'%Buffer Node%' -- Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N'Page life expectancy' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- PLE is a good measurement of internal memory pressure
-- Higher PLE is better. Watch the trend over time, not the absolute value
-- This will only return one row for non-NUMA systems

-- Page Life Expectancy isn�t what you think�
-- https://bit.ly/2EgynLa


-- Memory Grants Pending value for current instance  (Query 47) (Memory Grants Pending)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], RTRIM([object_name]) AS [Object Name], cntr_value AS [Memory Grants Pending]                                                                                                       
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N'%Memory Manager%' -- Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N'Memory Grants Pending' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Run multiple times, and run periodically if you suspect you are under memory pressure
-- Memory Grants Pending above zero for a sustained period is a very strong indicator of internal memory pressure


-- Memory Clerk Usage for instance  (Query 48) (Memory Clerk Usage)
-- Look for high value for CACHESTORE_SQLCP (Ad-hoc query plans)
SELECT TOP(10) mc.[type] AS [Memory Clerk Type], 
       CAST((SUM(mc.pages_kb)/1024.0) AS DECIMAL (15,2)) AS [Memory Usage (MB)] 
FROM sys.dm_os_memory_clerks AS mc WITH (NOLOCK)
GROUP BY mc.[type]  
ORDER BY SUM(mc.pages_kb) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- MEMORYCLERK_SQLBUFFERPOOL was new for SQL Server 2012. It should be your highest consumer of memory

-- CACHESTORE_SQLCP  SQL Plans         
-- These are cached SQL statements or batches that aren't in stored procedures, functions and triggers
-- Watch out for high values for CACHESTORE_SQLCP
-- Enabling 'optimize for ad hoc workloads' at the instance level can help reduce this
-- Running DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE ('SQL Plans') periodically may be required to better control this

-- CACHESTORE_OBJCP  Object Plans      
-- These are compiled plans for stored procedures, functions and triggers

-- sys.dm_os_memory_clerks (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2H31xDR



-- Find single-use, ad-hoc and prepared queries that are bloating the plan cache  (Query 49) (Ad hoc Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], t.[text] AS [Query Text], 
cp.objtype AS [Object Type], cp.cacheobjtype AS [Cache Object Type],  
cp.size_in_bytes/1024 AS [Plan Size in KB]
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t
WHERE cp.cacheobjtype = N'Compiled Plan' 
AND cp.objtype IN (N'Adhoc', N'Prepared') 
AND cp.usecounts = 1
ORDER BY cp.size_in_bytes DESC, DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you the text, type and size of single-use ad-hoc and prepared queries that waste space in the plan cache
-- Enabling 'optimize for ad hoc workloads' for the instance can help (SQL Server 2008 and above only)
-- Running DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE ('SQL Plans') periodically may be required to better control this
-- Enabling forced parameterization for the database can help, but test first!

-- Plan cache, adhoc workloads and clearing the single-use plan cache bloat
-- https://bit.ly/2EfYOkl


-- Get top total logical reads queries for entire instance (Query 50) (Top Logical Reads Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name],
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 255), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text], 
qs.total_logical_reads AS [Total Logical Reads],
qs.min_logical_reads AS [Min Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.max_logical_reads AS [Max Logical Reads],   
qs.min_worker_time AS [Min Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.max_worker_time AS [Max Worker Time], 
qs.min_elapsed_time AS [Min Elapsed Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time AS [Max Elapsed Time],
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count], 
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Helps you find the most expensive queries from a memory perspective across the entire instance
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues


-- Get top average elapsed time queries for entire instance (Query 51) (Top Avg Elapsed Time Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], 
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 255), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text],  
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
qs.min_elapsed_time, qs.max_elapsed_time, qs.last_elapsed_time,
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],  
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads], 
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Physical Reads], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you find the highest average elapsed time queries across the entire instance
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues


-- Look at UDF execution statistics (Query 52) (UDF Stats by DB)
SELECT TOP (25) DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name], 
		   OBJECT_NAME(object_id, database_id) AS [Function Name],
		   total_worker_time, execution_count, total_elapsed_time,  
           total_elapsed_time/execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],  
           last_elapsed_time, last_execution_time, cached_time, [type_desc] 
FROM sys.dm_exec_function_stats WITH (NOLOCK) 
ORDER BY total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- sys.dm_exec_function_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2q1Q6BM



-- Database specific queries *****************************************************************

-- **** Please switch to a user database that you are interested in! *****
--USE YourDatabaseName; -- make sure to change to an actual database on your instance, not the master system database
--GO

-- Individual File Sizes and space available for current database  (Query 53) (File Sizes and Space)
SELECT f.name AS [File Name] , f.physical_name AS [Physical Name], 
CAST((f.size/128.0) AS DECIMAL(15,2)) AS [Total Size in MB],
CAST(f.size/128.0 - CAST(FILEPROPERTY(f.name, 'SpaceUsed') AS int)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(15,2)) 
AS [Available Space In MB], f.[file_id], fg.name AS [Filegroup Name],
f.is_percent_growth, f.growth, fg.is_default, fg.is_read_only, 
fg.is_autogrow_all_files
FROM sys.database_files AS f WITH (NOLOCK) 
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.filegroups AS fg WITH (NOLOCK)
ON f.data_space_id = fg.data_space_id
ORDER BY f.[file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at how large and how full the files are and where they are located
-- Make sure the transaction log is not full!!

-- is_autogrow_all_files was new for SQL Server 2016. Equivalent to TF 1117 for user databases

-- SQL Server 2016: Changes in default behavior for autogrow and allocations for tempdb and user databases
-- https://bit.ly/2evRZSR


-- Log space usage for current database  (Query 54) (Log Space Usage)
SELECT DB_NAME(lsu.database_id) AS [Database Name], db.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model],
		CAST(lsu.total_log_size_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Total Log Space (MB)],
		CAST(lsu.used_log_space_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Used Log Space (MB)], 
		CAST(lsu.used_log_space_in_percent AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Used Log Space %],
		CAST(lsu.log_space_in_bytes_since_last_backup/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Used Log Space Since Last Backup (MB)],
		db.log_reuse_wait_desc		 
FROM sys.dm_db_log_space_usage AS lsu WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.databases AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
ON lsu.database_id = db.database_id
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at log file size and usage, along with the log reuse wait description for the current database

-- sys.dm_db_log_space_usage (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2H4MQw9


-- Status of last VLF for current database  (Query 55) (Last VLF Status)
SELECT TOP(1) DB_NAME(li.database_id) AS [Database Name], li.[file_id],
              li.vlf_size_mb, li.vlf_sequence_number, li.vlf_active, li.vlf_status
FROM sys.dm_db_log_info(DB_ID()) AS li 
ORDER BY vlf_sequence_number DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Determine whether you will be able to shrink the transaction log file

-- vlf_status Values
-- 0 is inactive 
-- 1 is initialized but unused 
-- 2 is active

-- sys.dm_db_log_info (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2EQUU1v



-- Get database scoped configuration values for current database (Query 56) (Database-scoped Configurations)
SELECT configuration_id, name, [value] AS [value_for_primary], value_for_secondary
FROM sys.database_scoped_configurations WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This lets you see the value of these new properties for the current database

-- Clear plan cache for current database
-- ALTER DATABASE SCOPED CONFIGURATION CLEAR PROCEDURE_CACHE;

-- ALTER DATABASE SCOPED CONFIGURATION (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2sOH7nb


-- I/O Statistics by file for the current database  (Query 57) (IO Stats By File)
SELECT DB_NAME(DB_ID()) AS [Database Name], df.name AS [Logical Name], vfs.[file_id], df.type_desc,
df.physical_name AS [Physical Name], CAST(vfs.size_on_disk_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Size on Disk (MB)],
vfs.num_of_reads, vfs.num_of_writes, vfs.io_stall_read_ms, vfs.io_stall_write_ms,
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_read_ms/(vfs.io_stall_read_ms + vfs.io_stall_write_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_write_ms/(vfs.io_stall_write_ms + vfs.io_stall_read_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Writes Pct],
(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS [Writes + Reads], 
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_read/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Read], 
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_written/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Written],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_reads/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_writes/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Write Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_read/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Read Bytes Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_written/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Written Bytes Pct]
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(DB_ID(), NULL) AS vfs
INNER JOIN sys.database_files AS df WITH (NOLOCK)
ON vfs.[file_id]= df.[file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you characterize your workload better from an I/O perspective for this database
-- It helps you determine whether you has an OLTP or DW/DSS type of workload



-- Get most frequently executed queries for this database (Query 58) (Query Execution Counts)
SELECT TOP(50) LEFT(t.[text], 50) AS [Short Query Text], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
qs.total_logical_reads AS [Total Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time AS [Total Elapsed Time],
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
WHERE t.dbid = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Queries 59 through 64 are the "Bad Man List" for stored procedures

-- Top Cached SPs By Execution Count (Query 59) (SP Execution Counts)
SELECT TOP(100) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time],    
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you which cached stored procedures are called the most often
-- This helps you characterize and baseline your workload


-- Top Cached SPs By Avg Elapsed Time (Query 60) (SP Avg Elapsed Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.min_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time, qs.last_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], 
qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY avg_elapsed_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find high average elapsed time cached stored procedures that
-- may be easy to optimize with standard query tuning techniques



-- Top Cached SPs By Total Worker time. Worker time relates to CPU cost  (Query 61) (SP Worker Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a CPU perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of CPU pressure


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Reads. Logical reads relate to memory pressure  (Query 62) (SP Logical Reads)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_reads AS [TotalLogicalReads], 
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalReads],qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute], 
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a memory perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of memory pressure


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Physical Reads. Physical reads relate to disk read I/O pressure  (Query 63) (SP Physical Reads)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name],qs.total_physical_reads AS [TotalPhysicalReads], 
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgPhysicalReads], qs.execution_count, 
qs.total_logical_reads,qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan 
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND qs.total_physical_reads > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_physical_reads DESC, qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a read I/O perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of I/O pressure or of memory pressure
       


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Writes (Query 64) (SP Logical Writes)
-- Logical writes relate to both memory and disk I/O pressure 
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_writes AS [TotalLogicalWrites], 
qs.total_logical_writes/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalWrites], qs.execution_count,
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan 
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND qs.total_logical_writes > 0
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_writes DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a write I/O perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of I/O pressure or of memory pressure


-- Lists the top statements by average input/output usage for the current database  (Query 65) (Top IO Statements)
SELECT TOP(50) OBJECT_NAME(qt.objectid, dbid) AS [SP Name],
(qs.total_logical_reads + qs.total_logical_writes) /qs.execution_count AS [Avg IO], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
SUBSTRING(qt.[text],qs.statement_start_offset/2, 
	(CASE 
		WHEN qs.statement_end_offset = -1 
	 THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 
		ELSE qs.statement_end_offset 
	 END - qs.statement_start_offset)/2) AS [Query Text]	
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) AS qt
WHERE qt.[dbid] = DB_ID()
ORDER BY [Avg IO] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you find the most expensive statements for I/O by SP



-- Possible Bad NC Indexes (writes > reads)  (Query 66) (Bad NC Indexes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(s.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], i.name AS [Index Name], i.index_id, 
i.is_disabled, i.is_hypothetical, i.has_filter, i.fill_factor,
s.user_updates AS [Total Writes], s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads],
s.user_updates - (s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups) AS [Difference]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(s.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
AND s.user_updates > (s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups)
AND i.index_id > 1 AND i.[type_desc] = N'NONCLUSTERED'
AND i.is_primary_key = 0 AND i.is_unique_constraint = 0 AND i.is_unique = 0
ORDER BY [Difference] DESC, [Total Writes] DESC, [Total Reads] ASC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look for indexes with high numbers of writes and zero or very low numbers of reads
-- Consider your complete workload, and how long your instance has been running
-- Investigate further before dropping an index!


-- Missing Indexes for current database by Index Advantage  (Query 67) (Missing Indexes)
SELECT DISTINCT CONVERT(decimal(18,2), user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01)) AS [index_advantage], 
migs.last_user_seek, mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, migs.avg_total_user_cost, migs.avg_user_impact,
OBJECT_NAME(mid.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], p.rows AS [Table Rows]
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = mid.[object_id]
WHERE mid.database_id = DB_ID()
AND p.index_id < 2 
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at index advantage, last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
-- SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware
-- Do not just blindly add indexes that show up from this query!!!


-- Find missing index warnings for cached plans in the current database  (Query 68) (Missing Index Warnings)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a busy instance
SELECT TOP(25) OBJECT_NAME(objectid) AS [ObjectName], 
               cp.objtype, cp.usecounts, cp.size_in_bytes, query_plan
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(cp.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE CAST(query_plan AS NVARCHAR(MAX)) LIKE N'%MissingIndex%'
AND dbid = DB_ID()
ORDER BY cp.usecounts DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you connect missing indexes to specific stored procedures or queries
-- This can help you decide whether to add them or not


-- Breaks down buffers used by current database by object (table, index) in the buffer cache  (Query 69) (Buffer Usage)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a busy instance
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) AS [Object Name], p.index_id, 
CAST(COUNT(*)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Buffer size(MB)],  
COUNT(*) AS [BufferCount], p.[Rows] AS [Row Count],
p.data_compression_desc AS [Compression Type]
FROM sys.allocation_units AS a WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors AS b WITH (NOLOCK)
ON a.allocation_unit_id = b.allocation_unit_id
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON a.container_id = p.hobt_id
WHERE b.database_id = CONVERT(int, DB_ID())
AND p.[object_id] > 100
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'plan_%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'xml_index_nodes%'
GROUP BY p.[object_id], p.index_id, p.data_compression_desc, p.[Rows]
ORDER BY [BufferCount] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you what tables and indexes are using the most memory in the buffer cache
-- It can help identify possible candidates for data compression


-- Get Table names, row counts, and compression status for clustered index or heap  (Query 70) (Table Sizes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS [ObjectName], 
SUM(Rows) AS [RowCount], data_compression_desc AS [CompressionType]
FROM sys.partitions WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE index_id < 2 --ignore the partitions from the non-clustered index if any
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'queue_%' 
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'filestream_tombstone%' 
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'fulltext%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'ifts_comp_fragment%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'filetable_updates%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'xml_index_nodes%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'sqlagent_job%'  
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'plan_persist%'  
GROUP BY object_id, data_compression_desc
ORDER BY SUM(Rows) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you an idea of table sizes, and possible data compression opportunities



-- Get some key table properties (Query 71) (Table Properties)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], p.[rows] AS [Table Rows], p.index_id, 
       p.data_compression_desc AS [Index Data Compression],
       t.create_date, t.lock_on_bulk_load, t.is_replicated, t.has_replication_filter, 
       t.is_tracked_by_cdc, t.lock_escalation_desc, t.is_filetable, 
	   t.is_memory_optimized, t.durability_desc, 
	   t.temporal_type_desc, t.is_remote_data_archive_enabled, t.is_external -- new for SQL Server 2016
FROM sys.tables AS t WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON t.[object_id] = p.[object_id]
WHERE OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
ORDER BY OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]), p.index_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some good information about your tables
-- is_memory_optimized and durability_desc were new in SQL Server 2014
-- temporal_type_desc, is_remote_data_archive_enabled, is_external were new in SQL Server 2016

-- sys.tables (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2Gk7998



-- When were Statistics last updated on all indexes?  (Query 72) (Statistics Update)
SELECT SCHEMA_NAME(o.Schema_ID) + N'.' + o.[NAME] AS [Object Name], o.[type_desc] AS [Object Type],
      i.[name] AS [Index Name], STATS_DATE(i.[object_id], i.index_id) AS [Statistics Date], 
      s.auto_created, s.no_recompute, s.user_created, s.is_incremental, s.is_temporary,
	  st.row_count, st.used_page_count
FROM sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON o.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id] 
AND i.index_id = s.stats_id
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_partition_stats AS st WITH (NOLOCK)
ON o.[object_id] = st.[object_id]
AND i.[index_id] = st.[index_id]
WHERE o.[type] IN ('U', 'V')
AND st.row_count > 0
ORDER BY STATS_DATE(i.[object_id], i.index_id) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------  

-- Helps discover possible problems with out-of-date statistics
-- Also gives you an idea which indexes are the most active

-- sys.stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2GyAxrn

-- UPDATEs to Statistics (Erin Stellato)
-- https://bit.ly/2vhrYQy




-- Look at most frequently modified indexes and statistics (Query 73) (Volatile Indexes)
SELECT o.[name] AS [Object Name], o.[object_id], o.[type_desc], s.[name] AS [Statistics Name], 
       s.stats_id, s.no_recompute, s.auto_created, s.is_incremental, s.is_temporary,
	   sp.modification_counter, sp.[rows], sp.rows_sampled, sp.last_updated
FROM sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.object_id = o.object_id
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_db_stats_properties(s.object_id, s.stats_id) AS sp
WHERE o.[type_desc] NOT IN (N'SYSTEM_TABLE', N'INTERNAL_TABLE')
AND sp.modification_counter > 0
ORDER BY sp.modification_counter DESC, o.name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you understand your workload and make better decisions about 
-- things like data compression and adding new indexes to a table



-- Get fragmentation info for all indexes above a certain size in the current database  (Query 74) (Index Fragmentation)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a very large database
SELECT DB_NAME(ps.database_id) AS [Database Name], SCHEMA_NAME(o.[schema_id]) AS [Schema Name],
OBJECT_NAME(ps.OBJECT_ID) AS [Object Name], i.[name] AS [Index Name], ps.index_id, 
ps.index_type_desc, ps.avg_fragmentation_in_percent, 
ps.fragment_count, ps.page_count, i.fill_factor, i.has_filter, 
i.filter_definition, i.[allow_page_locks]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats(DB_ID(),NULL, NULL, NULL , N'LIMITED') AS ps
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ps.[object_id] = i.[object_id] 
AND ps.index_id = i.index_id
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
WHERE ps.database_id = DB_ID()
AND ps.page_count > 2500
ORDER BY ps.avg_fragmentation_in_percent DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine whether you have framentation in your relational indexes
-- and how effective your index maintenance strategy is


--- Index Read/Write stats (all tables in current DB) ordered by Reads  (Query 75) (Overall Index Usage - Reads)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], i.[name] AS [IndexName], i.index_id, 
       s.user_seeks, s.user_scans, s.user_lookups,
	   s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads], 
	   s.user_updates AS [Writes],  
	   i.[type_desc] AS [Index Type], i.fill_factor AS [Fill Factor], i.has_filter, i.filter_definition, 
	   s.last_user_scan, s.last_user_lookup, s.last_user_seek
FROM sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(i.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
ORDER BY s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE); -- Order by reads
------

-- Show which indexes in the current database are most active for Reads


--- Index Read/Write stats (all tables in current DB) ordered by Writes  (Query 76) (Overall Index Usage - Writes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], i.[name] AS [IndexName], i.index_id,
	   s.user_updates AS [Writes], s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads], 
	   i.[type_desc] AS [Index Type], i.fill_factor AS [Fill Factor], i.has_filter, i.filter_definition,
	   s.last_system_update, s.last_user_update
FROM sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(i.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
ORDER BY s.user_updates DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);						 -- Order by writes
------

-- Show which indexes in the current database are most active for Writes


-- Get in-memory OLTP index usage (Query 77) (XTP Index Usage)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [Object Name], i.index_id, i.[name] AS [Index Name],
       i.[type_desc], xis.scans_started, xis.scans_retries, 
	   xis.rows_touched, xis.rows_returned
FROM sys.dm_db_xtp_index_stats AS xis WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = xis.[object_id] 
AND i.index_id = xis.index_id 
ORDER BY OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This gives you some index usage statistics for in-memory OLTP
-- Returns no data if you are not using in-memory OLTP

-- Guidelines for Using Indexes on Memory-Optimized Tables
-- https://bit.ly/2GCP8lF



-- Look at Columnstore index physical statistics (Query 78) (Columnstore Index Physical Stat)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(ps.object_id) AS [TableName],  
	i.[name] AS [IndexName], ps.index_id, ps.partition_number,
	ps.delta_store_hobt_id, ps.state_desc, ps.total_rows, ps.size_in_bytes,
	ps.trim_reason_desc, ps.generation, ps.transition_to_compressed_state_desc,
	ps.has_vertipaq_optimization, ps.deleted_rows,
	100 * (ISNULL(ps.deleted_rows, 0))/ps.total_rows AS [Fragmentation]
FROM sys.dm_db_column_store_row_group_physical_stats AS ps WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ps.object_id = i.object_id 
AND ps.index_id = i.index_id
ORDER BY ps.object_id, ps.partition_number, ps.row_group_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- sys.dm_db_column_store_row_group_physical_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2q276XQ



-- Get lock waits for current database (Query 79) (Lock Waits)
SELECT o.name AS [table_name], i.name AS [index_name], ios.index_id, ios.partition_number,
		SUM(ios.row_lock_wait_count) AS [total_row_lock_waits], 
		SUM(ios.row_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_row_lock_wait_in_ms],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_count) AS [total_page_lock_waits],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_page_lock_wait_in_ms],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms)+ SUM(row_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_lock_wait_in_ms]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_operational_stats(DB_ID(), NULL, NULL, NULL) AS ios
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ios.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ios.[object_id] = i.[object_id] 
AND ios.index_id = i.index_id
WHERE o.[object_id] > 100
GROUP BY o.name, i.name, ios.index_id, ios.partition_number
HAVING SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms)+ SUM(row_lock_wait_in_ms) > 0
ORDER BY total_lock_wait_in_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This query is helpful for troubleshooting blocking and deadlocking issues



-- Look at UDF execution statistics (Query 80) (UDF Statistics)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS [Function Name], execution_count,
	   total_worker_time, total_logical_reads, total_physical_reads, total_elapsed_time, 
	   total_elapsed_time/execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
	   FORMAT(cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
FROM sys.dm_exec_function_stats WITH (NOLOCK) 
WHERE database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE); 
------

-- New for SQL Server 2016
-- Helps you investigate scalar UDF performance issues
-- Does not return information for table valued functions

-- sys.dm_exec_function_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2q1Q6BM


-- Get QueryStore Options for this database (Query 81) (QueryStore Options)
SELECT actual_state_desc, desired_state_desc, [interval_length_minutes],
       current_storage_size_mb, [max_storage_size_mb], 
	   query_capture_mode_desc, size_based_cleanup_mode_desc
FROM sys.database_query_store_options WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- New for SQL Server 2016
-- Requires that Query Store is enabled for this database

-- Make sure that the actual_state_desc is the same as desired_state_desc
-- Make sure that the current_storage_size_mb is less than the max_storage_size_mb

-- Tuning Workload Performance with Query Store
-- https://bit.ly/1kHSl7w


-- Get highest aggregate duration queries over last hour (Query 82) (High Aggregate Duration Queries)
WITH AggregatedDurationLastHour
AS
(SELECT q.query_id, SUM(rs.count_executions * rs.avg_duration) AS total_duration,
   COUNT (DISTINCT p.plan_id) AS number_of_plans
   FROM sys.query_store_query_text AS qt WITH (NOLOCK)
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query AS q WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON qt.query_text_id = q.query_text_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_plan AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON q.query_id = p.query_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_runtime_stats AS rs WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON rs.plan_id = p.plan_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_runtime_stats_interval AS rsi WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON rsi.runtime_stats_interval_id = rs.runtime_stats_interval_id
   WHERE rsi.start_time >= DATEADD(hour, -1, GETUTCDATE()) 
   AND rs.execution_type_desc = N'Regular'
   GROUP BY q.query_id), OrderedDuration 
AS
(SELECT query_id, total_duration, number_of_plans, 
 ROW_NUMBER () OVER (ORDER BY total_duration DESC, query_id) AS RN
 FROM AggregatedDurationLastHour)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(q.object_id) AS [Containing Object], qt.query_sql_text, 
od.total_duration AS [Total Duration (microsecs)], 
od.number_of_plans AS [Plan Count],
p.is_forced_plan, p.is_parallel_plan, p.is_trivial_plan,
q.query_parameterization_type_desc, p.[compatibility_level],
p.last_compile_start_time, 
q.last_execution_time,
CONVERT(xml, p.query_plan) AS query_plan_xml 
FROM OrderedDuration AS od 
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query AS q WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_id  = od.query_id
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query_text AS qt WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_text_id = qt.query_text_id
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_plan AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_id = p.query_id
WHERE od.RN <= 50 
ORDER BY od.total_duration DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- New for SQL Server 2016
-- Requires that QueryStore is enabled for this database



-- Get highest aggregate CPU time queries over last hour (Query 83) (High Aggregate CPU Queries)
WITH AggregatedCPULastHour
AS
(SELECT q.query_id, SUM(rs.count_executions * rs.avg_cpu_time) AS total_cpu_time,
   COUNT (DISTINCT p.plan_id) AS number_of_plans
   FROM sys.query_store_query_text AS qt WITH (NOLOCK)
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query AS q WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON qt.query_text_id = q.query_text_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_plan AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON q.query_id = p.query_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_runtime_stats AS rs WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON rs.plan_id = p.plan_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_runtime_stats_interval AS rsi WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON rsi.runtime_stats_interval_id = rs.runtime_stats_interval_id
   WHERE rsi.start_time >= DATEADD(hour, -1, GETUTCDATE()) 
   AND rs.execution_type_desc = N'Regular'
   GROUP BY q.query_id), OrderedDuration 
AS
(SELECT query_id, total_cpu_time, number_of_plans, 
 ROW_NUMBER () OVER (ORDER BY total_cpu_time DESC, query_id) AS RN
 FROM AggregatedCPULastHour)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(q.object_id) AS [Containing Object], qt.query_sql_text, 
od.total_cpu_time AS [Total CPU Time (microsecs)], 
od.number_of_plans AS [Plan Count],
p.is_forced_plan, p.is_parallel_plan, p.is_trivial_plan,
q.query_parameterization_type_desc, p.[compatibility_level],
p.last_compile_start_time, 
q.last_execution_time,
CONVERT(xml, p.query_plan) AS query_plan_xml 
FROM OrderedDuration AS od 
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query AS q WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_id  = od.query_id
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query_text AS qt WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_text_id = qt.query_text_id
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_plan AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_id = p.query_id
WHERE od.RN <= 50 
ORDER BY od.total_cpu_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- New for SQL Server 2016
-- Requires that QueryStore is enabled for this database


-- Get input buffer information for the current database (Query 84) (Input Buffer)
SELECT es.session_id, DB_NAME(es.database_id) AS [Database Name],
       es.login_time, es.cpu_time, es.logical_reads, es.memory_usage,
       es.[status], ib.event_info AS [Input Buffer]
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions AS es WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_input_buffer(es.session_id, NULL) AS ib
WHERE es.database_id = DB_ID()
AND es.session_id > 50
AND es.session_id <> @@SPID OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you input buffer information from all non-system sessions for the current database
-- Replaces DBCC INPUTBUFFER

-- New DMF for retrieving input buffer in SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2uHKMbz

-- sys.dm_exec_input_buffer (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2J5Hf9q



-- Get any resumable index rebuild operation information (Query 85) (Resumable Index Rebuild)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(iro.object_id) AS [Object Name], iro.index_id, iro.name AS [Index Name],
       iro.sql_text, iro.last_max_dop_used, iro.partition_number, iro.state_desc, iro.start_time, iro.percent_complete
FROM  sys.index_resumable_operations AS iro WITH (NOLOCK)
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------ 

-- index_resumable_operations (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pYSWqq


-- Get database automatic tuning options (Query 86) (Automatic Tuning Options)
SELECT [name], desired_state_desc, actual_state_desc, reason_desc
FROM sys.database_automatic_tuning_options WITH (NOLOCK)
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------ 

-- sys.database_automatic_tuning_options (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2FHhLkL



-- Look at recent Full backups for the current database (Query 87) (Recent Full Backups)
SELECT TOP (30) bs.machine_name, bs.server_name, bs.database_name AS [Database Name], bs.recovery_model,
CONVERT (BIGINT, bs.backup_size / 1048576 ) AS [Uncompressed Backup Size (MB)],
CONVERT (BIGINT, bs.compressed_backup_size / 1048576 ) AS [Compressed Backup Size (MB)],
CONVERT (NUMERIC (20,2), (CONVERT (FLOAT, bs.backup_size) /
CONVERT (FLOAT, bs.compressed_backup_size))) AS [Compression Ratio], bs.has_backup_checksums, bs.is_copy_only, bs.encryptor_type,
DATEDIFF (SECOND, bs.backup_start_date, bs.backup_finish_date) AS [Backup Elapsed Time (sec)],
bs.backup_finish_date AS [Backup Finish Date], bmf.physical_device_name AS [Backup Location], bmf.physical_block_size
FROM msdb.dbo.backupset AS bs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.backupmediafamily AS bmf WITH (NOLOCK)
ON bs.media_set_id = bmf.media_set_id  
WHERE bs.database_name = DB_NAME(DB_ID())
AND bs.[type] = 'D' -- Change to L if you want Log backups
ORDER BY bs.backup_finish_date DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Are your backup sizes and times changing over time?
-- Are you using backup compression?
-- Are you using backup checksums?
-- Are you doing copy_only backups?
-- Are you doing encrypted backups?
-- Have you done any backup tuning with striped backups, or changing the parameters of the backup command?

-- In SQL Server 2016, native SQL Server backup compression actually works 
-- much better with databases that are using TDE than in previous versions
-- https://bit.ly/28Rpb2x


-- These three Pluralsight Courses go into more detail about how to run these queries and interpret the results

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 1 
-- https://bit.ly/2plxCer

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 2
-- https://bit.ly/2IuJpzI

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 3
-- https://bit.ly/2FIlCPb



-- Sign up for Microsoft Visual Studio Dev Essentials and get a free three month pass to Pluralsight

-- Microsoft Visual Studio Dev Essentials
-- http://bit.ly/1q6xbDL


-- Sign up for Microsoft Azure Essentials and get lots of free Azure usage credits, MCP exam voucher, three month Pluralsight subscription

-- Microsoft Azure Essentials
-- https://bit.ly/2JMWe8x


-- August 2017 blog series about upgrading and migrating SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2ftKVrX
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\Commands\SelectDbaObjectCommand.cs
using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Management.Automation;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Parameter;

namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Commands
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Implements the Select-DbaObject command
    /// </summary>
    [Cmdlet("Select", "DbaObject", DefaultParameterSetName = "DefaultParameter", RemotingCapability = RemotingCapability.None)]
    public class SelectDbaObjectCommand : PSCmdlet
    {
        #region Parameters
        /// <summary>
        /// The actual input object that is being processed
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter(ValueFromPipeline = true)]
        public PSObject InputObject;

        /// <summary>
        /// The properties to select. Supports fancy DSL
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter(ParameterSetName = "DefaultParameter", Position = 0)]
        [Parameter(ParameterSetName = "SkipLastParameter", Position = 0)]
        public DbaSelectParameter[] Property = new DbaSelectParameter[0];

        /// <summary>
        /// Properties to skip
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter(ParameterSetName = "DefaultParameter")]
        [Parameter(ParameterSetName = "SkipLastParameter")]
        public string[] ExcludeProperty = new string[0];

        /// <summary>
        /// A property to expand.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter(ParameterSetName = "DefaultParameter")]
        [Parameter(ParameterSetName = "SkipLastParameter")]
        public string ExpandProperty;

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether to exclude duplicates
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public SwitchParameter Unique;

        /// <summary>
        /// The last number of items to pick
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter(ParameterSetName = "DefaultParameter")]
        [ValidateRange(0, 2147483647)]
        public int Last;

        /// <summary>
        /// Pick the first n items.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter(ParameterSetName = "DefaultParameter")]
        [ValidateRange(0, 2147483647)]
        public int First;

        /// <summary>
        /// Skip n items before picking items
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter(ParameterSetName = "DefaultParameter")]
        [ValidateRange(0, 2147483647)]
        public int Skip;

        /// <summary>
        /// Skip the last n items
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter(ParameterSetName = "SkipLastParameter")]
        [ValidateRange(0, 2147483647)]
        public int SkipLast;

        /// <summary>
        /// 
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter(ParameterSetName = "IndexParameter")]
        [Parameter(ParameterSetName = "DefaultParameter")]
        public SwitchParameter Wait;

        /// <summary>
        /// 
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter(ParameterSetName = "IndexParameter")]
        [ValidateRange(0, 2147483647)]
        public int[] Index;

        /// <summary>
        /// THe properties to display by default
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public string[] ShowProperty = new string[0];

        /// <summary>
        /// The properties to NOT display by default
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public string[] ShowExcludeProperty = new string[0];

        /// <summary>
        /// The typename to assign to the psobject
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public string TypeName;

        /// <summary>
        /// Keep the original input object, just add to it.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public SwitchParameter KeepInputObject;
        #endregion Parameters

        #region Private Fields
        /// <summary>
        /// List of properties to NOT clone into the hashtable used against Select-Object
        /// </summary>
        private string[] _NonclonedProperties = new string[] { "Property", "ShowProperty", "ShowExcludeProperty", "TypeName", "KeepInputObject" };

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether some adjustments to the object need to be done or whether the Select-Object output can be simply passed through.
        /// </summary>
        private bool _NoAdjustment = true;

        /// <summary>
        /// The set controlling what properties will be shown by default
        /// </summary>
        private PSMemberInfo[] _DisplayPropertySet;

        /// <summary>
        /// THe pipeline that is wrapped around Select-Object
        /// </summary>
        private SteppablePipeline _Pipeline;
        #endregion Private Fields

        #region Command Implementation
        /// <summary>
        /// Implements the begin action of the command
        /// </summary>
        protected override void BeginProcessing()
        {
            object outBuffer;
            if (MyInvocation.BoundParameters.TryGetValue("OutBuffer", out outBuffer))
            {
                MyInvocation.BoundParameters["OutBuffer"] = 1;
            }

            Hashtable clonedBoundParameters = new Hashtable();
            foreach (string key in MyInvocation.BoundParameters.Keys)
                if (!_NonclonedProperties.Contains(key))
                    clonedBoundParameters[key] = MyInvocation.BoundParameters[key];

            if (MyInvocation.BoundParameters.ContainsKey("Property"))
                clonedBoundParameters["Property"] = Property.Select(o => o.Value).AsEnumerable().ToArray();

            if ((ShowExcludeProperty.Length > 0) || (ShowProperty.Length > 0) || (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(TypeName)) || (KeepInputObject.ToBool()))
                _NoAdjustment = false;

            if (ShowProperty.Length > 0)
                _DisplayPropertySet = new PSMemberInfo[] { new PSPropertySet("DefaultDisplayPropertySet", ShowProperty) };

            // Set the list of parameters to a variable in the caller scope, so it can be splatted
            this.SessionState.PSVariable.Set("__PSFramework_SelectParam", clonedBoundParameters);
            ScriptBlock scriptCommand = ScriptBlock.Create("Select-Object @__PSFramework_SelectParam");
            _Pipeline = scriptCommand.GetSteppablePipeline(MyInvocation.CommandOrigin);

            if (_NoAdjustment)
                _Pipeline.Begin(this);
            else
                _Pipeline.Begin(true);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Implements the process action of the command
        /// </summary>
        protected override void ProcessRecord()
        {
            if (_NoAdjustment)
                _Pipeline.Process(InputObject);
            else
            {
                PSObject item = PSObject.AsPSObject(_Pipeline.Process(InputObject).GetValue(0));

                if (KeepInputObject.ToBool())
                {
                    PSObject tempItem = item;
                    item = InputObject;
                    foreach (PSPropertyInfo info in tempItem.Properties.Where(o => !item.Properties.Select(n => n.Name).Contains(o.Name)))
                        item.Properties.Add(info);
                }
                if (ShowProperty.Length > 0)
                    item.Members.Add(new PSMemberSet("PSStandardMembers", _DisplayPropertySet));
                else if (ShowExcludeProperty.Length > 0)
                    item.Members.Add(new PSMemberSet("PSStandardMembers", new PSMemberInfo[] { new PSPropertySet("DefaultDisplayPropertySet", item.Properties.Select(o => o.Name).Where(o => !ShowExcludeProperty.Contains(o))) }));
                if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(TypeName))
                    item.TypeNames.Insert(0, TypeName);
                WriteObject(item);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Implements the end action of the command
        /// </summary>
        protected override void EndProcessing()
        {
            _Pipeline.End();
        }
        #endregion Command Implementation
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\Commands\WriteMessageCommand.cs
using Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Message;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Management.Automation;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Commands
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Implements the Write-Message command, performing message handling and loggin
    /// </summary>
    [Cmdlet("Write", "Message")]
    public class WriteMessageCommand : PSCmdlet
    {
        #region Parameters
        /// <summary>
        /// This parameter represents the verbosity of the message. The lower the number, the more important it is for a human user to read the message.
        /// By default, the levels are distributed like this:
        /// - 1-3 Direct verbose output to the user (using Write-Host)
        /// - 4-6 Output only visible when requesting extra verbosity (using Write-Verbose)
        /// - 1-9 Debugging information, written using Write-Debug
        /// 
        /// In addition, it is possible to select the level "Warning" which moves the message out of the configurable range:
        /// The user will always be shown this message, unless he silences the entire verbosity.
        /// 
        /// Possible levels:
        /// Critical (1), Important / Output / Host (2), Significant (3), VeryVerbose (4), Verbose (5), SomewhatVerbose (6), System (7), Debug (8), InternalComment (9), Warning (666)
        /// Either one of the strings or its respective number will do as input.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public MessageLevel Level = MessageLevel.Verbose;

        /// <summary>
        /// The message to write/log. The function name and timestamp will automatically be prepended.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter(Mandatory = true, Position = 0)]
        [AllowEmptyString]
        [AllowNull]
        public string Message;

        /// <summary>
        /// Tags to add to the message written.
		/// This allows filtering and grouping by category of message, targeting specific messages.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public string[] Tag;

        /// <summary>
        /// The name of the calling function.
		/// Will be automatically set, but can be overridden when necessary.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public string FunctionName;

        /// <summary>
        /// The name of the module, the calling function is part of.
		/// Will be automatically set, but can be overridden when necessary.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public string ModuleName;

        /// <summary>
        /// The file in which Write-Message was called.
		/// Will be automatically set, but can be overridden when necessary.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public string File;

        /// <summary>
        /// The line on which Write-Message was called.
		/// Will be automatically set, but can be overridden when necessary.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public int Line;

        /// <summary>
        /// If an error record should be noted with the message, add the full record here.
		/// Especially designed for use with Warning-mode, it can legally be used in either mode.
        /// The error will be added to the $Error variable and enqued in the logging/debugging system.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public ErrorRecord[] ErrorRecord;

        /// <summary>
        /// Allows specifying an inner exception as input object. This will be passed on to the logging and used for messages.
		/// When specifying both ErrorRecord AND Exception, Exception wins, but ErrorRecord is still used for record metadata.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public Exception Exception;

        /// <summary>
        /// Setting this parameter will cause this function to write the message only once per session.
		/// The string passed here and the calling function's name are used to create a unique ID, which is then used to register the action in the configuration system.
		/// Thus will the lockout only be written if called once and not burden the system unduly.
        /// This lockout will be written as a hidden value, to see it use Get-DbaConfig -Force.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public string Once;

        /// <summary>
        /// Disables automatic appending of exception messages.
		/// Use in cases where you already have a speaking message interpretation and do not need the original message.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public SwitchParameter OverrideExceptionMessage;

        /// <summary>
        /// Add the object the message is all about, in order to simplify debugging / troubleshooting.
		/// For example, when calling this from a function targeting a remote computer, the computername could be specified here, allowing all messages to easily be correlated to the object processed.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public object Target;

        /// <summary>
        /// This parameters disables user-friendly warnings and enables the throwing of exceptions.
		/// This is less user friendly, but allows catching exceptions in calling scripts.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public bool EnableException;

        /// <summary>
        /// Enables breakpoints on the current message. By default, setting '-Debug' will NOT cause an interrupt on the current position.
        /// </summary>
        [Parameter()]
        public SwitchParameter Breakpoint;
        #endregion Parameters

        #region Private fields
        /// <summary>
        /// The start time of the cmdlet
        /// </summary>
        private DateTime _timestamp;

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether this cmdlet is run in silent mode
        /// </summary>
        private bool _silent = false;

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether this cmdlet was called by Stop-Function
        /// </summary>
        private bool _fromStopFunction = false;

        /// <summary>
        /// The current callstack
        /// </summary>
        private IEnumerable<CallStackFrame> _callStack = null;

        /// <summary>
        /// How many items exist on the callstack
        /// </summary>
        private int _stackDepth;

        /// <summary>
        /// The message to write
        /// </summary>
        private string _message;

        /// <summary>
        /// The message simplified without timestamps. Used for logging.
        /// </summary>
        private string _messageSimple;

        /// <summary>
        /// The message to write in color
        /// </summary>
        private string _messageColor;

        /// <summary>
        /// Non-colored version of developermode
        /// </summary>
        private string _messageDeveloper;

        /// <summary>
        /// Colored version of developermode
        /// </summary>
        private string _messageDeveloperColor;

        /// <summary>
        /// Scriptblock that writes the host messages
        /// </summary>
        private static string _writeHostScript = @"
param ( $string )

if ([Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Message.MessageHost]::DeveloperMode) { Write-HostColor -String $string -DefaultColor ([Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Message.MessageHost]::DeveloperColor) -ErrorAction Ignore }
else { Write-HostColor -String $string -DefaultColor ([Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Message.MessageHost]::InfoColor) -ErrorAction Ignore }
";

        /// <summary>
        /// List of tags to process
        /// </summary>
        private List<string> _Tags = new List<string>();

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether debug mode is enabled
        /// </summary>
        private bool _isDebug;
        #endregion Private fields

        #region Private properties
        /// <summary>
        /// The input message with the error content included if desired
        /// </summary>
        private string _errorQualifiedMessage
        {
            get
            {
                if (ErrorRecord == null)
                    return Message;

                if (ErrorRecord.Length == 0)
                    return Message;

                if (OverrideExceptionMessage.ToBool())
                    return Message;

                if (Regex.IsMatch(Message, Regex.Escape(ErrorRecord[0].Exception.Message)))
                    return Message;

                return String.Format("{0} | {1}", Message, ErrorRecord[0].Exception.Message);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The final message to use for internal logging
        /// </summary>
        private string _MessageSystem
        {
            get
            {
                return GetMessageSimple();
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The final message to use for writing to streams, such as verbose or warning
        /// </summary>
        private string _MessageStreams
        {
            get
            {
                if (MessageHost.DeveloperMode)
                    return GetMessageDeveloper();
                else
                    return GetMessage();
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The final message to use for host messages (write using Write-HostColor)
        /// </summary>
        private string _MessageHost
        {
            get
            {
                if (MessageHost.DeveloperMode)
                    return GetMessageDeveloperColor();
                else
                    return GetMessageColor();
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Provide breadcrumb queue of the callstack
        /// </summary>
        private string _BreadCrumbsString
        {
            get
            {
                string crumbs = String.Join(" > ", _callStack.Select(name => name.FunctionName).Where(name => name != "Write-Message" && name != "Stop-Function" && name != "<ScriptBlock>").Reverse().ToList());
                if (crumbs.EndsWith(FunctionName))
                    return String.Format("[{0}]\n    ", crumbs);
                return String.Format("[{0}] [{1}]\n    ", crumbs, FunctionName);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Provide a breadcrumb queue of the callstack in color tags
        /// </summary>
        private string _BreadCrumbsStringColored
        {
            get
            {
                string crumbs = String.Join("</c> > <c='sub'>", _callStack.Select(name => name.FunctionName).Where(name => name != "Write-Message" && name != "Stop-Function" && name != "<ScriptBlock>").Reverse().ToList());
                if (crumbs.EndsWith(FunctionName))
                    return String.Format("[<c='sub'>{0}</c>]\n    ", crumbs);
                return String.Format("[<c='sub'>{0}</c>] [<c='sub'>{1}</c>]\n    ", crumbs, FunctionName);
            }
        }
        #endregion Private properties

        #region Cmdlet Implementation
        /// <summary>
        /// Processes the begin phase of the cmdlet
        /// </summary>
        protected override void BeginProcessing()
        {
            _timestamp = DateTime.Now;

            #region Resolving Meta Information
            _callStack = Utility.UtilityHost.Callstack;
            CallStackFrame callerFrame = null;
            if (_callStack.Count() > 0)
                callerFrame = _callStack.First();
            _stackDepth = _callStack.Count();

            if (callerFrame != null)
            {
                if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(FunctionName))
                {
                    if (callerFrame.InvocationInfo == null)
                        FunctionName = callerFrame.FunctionName;
                    else if (callerFrame.InvocationInfo.MyCommand == null)
                        FunctionName = callerFrame.InvocationInfo.InvocationName;
                    else if (callerFrame.InvocationInfo.MyCommand.Name != "")
                        FunctionName = callerFrame.InvocationInfo.MyCommand.Name;
                    else
                        FunctionName = callerFrame.FunctionName;
                }

                if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(ModuleName))
                    if ((callerFrame.InvocationInfo != null) && (callerFrame.InvocationInfo.MyCommand != null))
                        ModuleName = callerFrame.InvocationInfo.MyCommand.ModuleName;

                if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(File))
                    File = callerFrame.Position.File;

                if (Line <= 0)
                    Line = callerFrame.Position.EndLineNumber;

                if (callerFrame.FunctionName == "Stop-Function")
                    _fromStopFunction = true;
            }

            if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(FunctionName))
                FunctionName = "<Unknown>";
            if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(ModuleName))
                ModuleName = "<Unknown>";

            if (MessageHost.DisableVerbosity)
                _silent = true;

            if (Tag != null)
                foreach (string item in Tag)
                    _Tags.Add(item);

            _isDebug = (_callStack.Count() > 1) && _callStack.ElementAt(_callStack.Count() - 2).InvocationInfo.BoundParameters.ContainsKey("Debug");
            #endregion Resolving Meta Information
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Processes the process phase of the cmdlet
        /// </summary>
        protected override void ProcessRecord()
        {
            #region Perform Transforms
            if ((!_fromStopFunction) && (Target != null))
                Target = ResolveTarget(Target);

            if (!_fromStopFunction)
            {
                if (Exception != null)
                    Exception = ResolveException(Exception);
                else if (ErrorRecord != null)
                {
                    Exception tempException = null;
                    for (int n = 0; n < ErrorRecord.Length; n++)
                    {
                        // If both Exception and ErrorRecord are specified, override the first error record's exception.
                        if ((n == 0) && (Exception != null))
                            tempException = Exception;
                        else
                            tempException = ResolveException(ErrorRecord[n].Exception);
                        if (tempException != ErrorRecord[n].Exception)
                            ErrorRecord[n] = new ErrorRecord(tempException, ErrorRecord[n].FullyQualifiedErrorId, ErrorRecord[n].CategoryInfo.Category, ErrorRecord[n].TargetObject);
                    }
                }
            }

            if (Level != MessageLevel.Warning)
                Level = ResolveLevel(Level);
            #endregion Perform Transforms

            #region Exception Integration
            /*
                While conclusive error handling must happen after message handling,
                in order to integrate the exception message into the actual message,
                it becomes necessary to first integrate the exception and error record parameters into a uniform view
	
                Note: Stop-Function never specifies this parameter, thus it is not necessary to check,
                whether this function was called from Stop-Function.
             */
            if ((ErrorRecord == null) && (Exception != null))
            {
                ErrorRecord = new ErrorRecord[1];
                ErrorRecord[0] = new ErrorRecord(Exception, String.Format("{0}_{1}", ModuleName, FunctionName), ErrorCategory.NotSpecified, Target);
            }
            #endregion Exception Integration

            #region Error handling
            if (ErrorRecord != null)
            {
                if (!_fromStopFunction)
                    if (EnableException)
                        foreach (ErrorRecord record in ErrorRecord)
                            WriteError(record);

                LogHost.WriteErrorEntry(ErrorRecord, FunctionName, ModuleName, _Tags, _timestamp, _MessageSystem, System.Management.Automation.Runspaces.Runspace.DefaultRunspace.InstanceId, Environment.MachineName);
            }
            #endregion Error handling

            LogEntryType channels = LogEntryType.None;

            #region Warning handling
            if (Level == MessageLevel.Warning)
            {
                if (!_silent)
                {
                    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(Once))
                    {
                        string onceName = String.Format("MessageOnce.{0}.{1}", FunctionName, Once).ToLower();
                        if (!(Configuration.ConfigurationHost.Configurations.ContainsKey(onceName) && (bool)Configuration.ConfigurationHost.Configurations[onceName].Value))
                        {
                            WriteWarning(_MessageStreams);
                            channels = channels | LogEntryType.Warning;

                            Configuration.Config cfg = new Configuration.Config();
                            cfg.Module = "messageonce";
                            cfg.Name = String.Format("{0}.{1}", FunctionName, Once).ToLower();
                            cfg.Hidden = true;
                            cfg.Description = "Locking setting that disables further display of the specified message";
                            cfg.Value = true;

                            Configuration.ConfigurationHost.Configurations[onceName] = cfg;
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        WriteWarning(_MessageStreams);
                        channels = channels | LogEntryType.Warning;
                    }
                }
                WriteDebug(_MessageStreams);
                channels = channels | LogEntryType.Debug;
            }
            #endregion Warning handling

            #region Message handling
            if (!_silent)
            {
                if ((MessageHost.MaximumInformation >= (int)Level) && (MessageHost.MinimumInformation <= (int)Level))
                {
                    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(Once))
                    {
                        string onceName = String.Format("MessageOnce.{0}.{1}", FunctionName, Once).ToLower();
                        if (!(Configuration.ConfigurationHost.Configurations.ContainsKey(onceName) && (bool)Configuration.ConfigurationHost.Configurations[onceName].Value))
                        {
                            InvokeCommand.InvokeScript(false, ScriptBlock.Create(_writeHostScript), null, _MessageHost);
                            channels = channels | LogEntryType.Information;

                            Configuration.Config cfg = new Configuration.Config();
                            cfg.Module = "messageonce";
                            cfg.Name = String.Format("{0}.{1}", FunctionName, Once).ToLower();
                            cfg.Hidden = true;
                            cfg.Description = "Locking setting that disables further display of the specified message";
                            cfg.Value = true;

                            Configuration.ConfigurationHost.Configurations[onceName] = cfg;
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        //InvokeCommand.InvokeScript(_writeHostScript, _MessageHost);
                        InvokeCommand.InvokeScript(false, ScriptBlock.Create(_writeHostScript), null, _MessageHost);
                        channels = channels | LogEntryType.Information;
                    }
                }
            }

            if ((MessageHost.MaximumVerbose >= (int)Level) && (MessageHost.MinimumVerbose <= (int)Level))
            {
                if ((_callStack.Count() > 1) && _callStack.ElementAt(_callStack.Count() - 2).InvocationInfo.BoundParameters.ContainsKey("Verbose"))
                    InvokeCommand.InvokeScript(@"$VerbosePreference = 'Continue'");
                //SessionState.PSVariable.Set("VerbosePreference", ActionPreference.Continue);

                WriteVerbose(_MessageStreams);
                channels = channels | LogEntryType.Verbose;
            }

            if ((MessageHost.MaximumDebug >= (int)Level) && (MessageHost.MinimumDebug <= (int)Level))
            {
                bool restoreInquire = false;
                if (_isDebug)
                {
                    if (Breakpoint.ToBool())
                        InvokeCommand.InvokeScript(false, ScriptBlock.Create(@"$DebugPreference = 'Inquire'"), null, null);
                    else
                    {
                        InvokeCommand.InvokeScript(false, ScriptBlock.Create(@"$DebugPreference = 'Continue'"), null, null);
                        restoreInquire = true;
                    }
                    WriteDebug(String.Format("{0} | {1}", Line, _MessageStreams));
                    channels = channels | LogEntryType.Debug;
                }
                else
                {
                    WriteDebug(_MessageStreams);
                    channels = channels | LogEntryType.Debug;
                }

                if (restoreInquire)
                    InvokeCommand.InvokeScript(false, ScriptBlock.Create(@"$DebugPreference = 'Inquire'"), null, null);
            }
            #endregion Message handling

            #region Logging
            LogEntry entry = LogHost.WriteLogEntry(_MessageSystem, channels, _timestamp, FunctionName, ModuleName, _Tags, Level, System.Management.Automation.Runspaces.Runspace.DefaultRunspace.InstanceId, Environment.MachineName, File, Line, _callStack, String.Format("{0}\\{1}", Environment.UserDomainName, Environment.UserName), Target);
            #endregion Logging

            foreach (MessageEventSubscription subscription in MessageHost.Events.Values)
                if (subscription.Applies(entry))
                {
                    try { InvokeCommand.InvokeScript(subscription.ScriptBlock.ToString(), entry); }
                    catch (Exception e) { WriteError(new ErrorRecord(e, "", ErrorCategory.NotSpecified, entry)); }
                }
        }
        #endregion Cmdlet Implementation

        #region Helper methods
        /// <summary>
        /// Processes the target transform rules on an input object
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Item">The item to transform</param>
        /// <returns>The transformed object</returns>
        private object ResolveTarget(object Item)
        {
            if (Item == null)
                return null;

            string lowTypeName = Item.GetType().FullName.ToLower();

            if (MessageHost.TargetTransforms.ContainsKey(lowTypeName))
            {
                try { return InvokeCommand.InvokeScript(false, ScriptBlock.Create(MessageHost.TargetTransforms[lowTypeName].ToString()), null, Item); }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    MessageHost.WriteTransformError(new ErrorRecord(e, "Write-Message", ErrorCategory.OperationStopped, null), FunctionName, ModuleName, Item, TransformType.Target, System.Management.Automation.Runspaces.Runspace.DefaultRunspace.InstanceId);
                    return Item;
                }
            }

            TransformCondition transform = MessageHost.TargetTransformlist.Get(lowTypeName, ModuleName, FunctionName);
            if (transform != null)
            {
                try { return InvokeCommand.InvokeScript(false, ScriptBlock.Create(transform.ScriptBlock.ToString()), null, Item); }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    MessageHost.WriteTransformError(new ErrorRecord(e, "Write-Message", ErrorCategory.OperationStopped, null), FunctionName, ModuleName, Item, TransformType.Target, System.Management.Automation.Runspaces.Runspace.DefaultRunspace.InstanceId);
                    return Item;
                }
            }

            return Item;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Processes the specified exception specified
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Item">The exception to process</param>
        /// <returns>The transformed exception</returns>
        private Exception ResolveException(Exception Item)
        {
            if (Item == null)
                return Item;

            string lowTypeName = Item.GetType().FullName.ToLower();

            if (MessageHost.ExceptionTransforms.ContainsKey(lowTypeName))
            {
                try { return (Exception)InvokeCommand.InvokeScript(false, ScriptBlock.Create(MessageHost.ExceptionTransforms[lowTypeName].ToString()), null, Item)[0].BaseObject; }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    MessageHost.WriteTransformError(new ErrorRecord(e, "Write-Message", ErrorCategory.OperationStopped, null), FunctionName, ModuleName, Item, TransformType.Exception, System.Management.Automation.Runspaces.Runspace.DefaultRunspace.InstanceId);
                    return Item;
                }
            }

            TransformCondition transform = MessageHost.ExceptionTransformList.Get(lowTypeName, ModuleName, FunctionName);
            if (transform != null)
            {
                try { return (Exception)InvokeCommand.InvokeScript(false, ScriptBlock.Create(transform.ScriptBlock.ToString()), null, Item)[0].BaseObject; }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    MessageHost.WriteTransformError(new ErrorRecord(e, "Write-Message", ErrorCategory.OperationStopped, null), FunctionName, ModuleName, Item, TransformType.Exception, System.Management.Automation.Runspaces.Runspace.DefaultRunspace.InstanceId);
                    return Item;
                }
            }

            return Item;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Processs the input level and apply policy and rules
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Level">The original level of the message</param>
        /// <returns>The processed level</returns>
        private MessageLevel ResolveLevel(MessageLevel Level)
        {
            int tempLevel = (int)Level;

            if (MessageHost.NestedLevelDecrement > 0)
            {
                int depth = _stackDepth - 2;
                if (_fromStopFunction)
                    depth--;
                tempLevel = tempLevel + depth * MessageHost.NestedLevelDecrement;
            }

            if (MessageHost.MessageLevelModifiers.Count > 0)
                foreach (MessageLevelModifier modifier in MessageHost.MessageLevelModifiers.Values)
                    if (modifier.AppliesTo(FunctionName, ModuleName, _Tags))
                        tempLevel = tempLevel + modifier.Modifier;

            if (tempLevel > 9)
                tempLevel = 9;
            if (tempLevel < 1)
                tempLevel = 1;

            return (MessageLevel)tempLevel;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Builds the message item for display of Verbose, Warning and Debug streams
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>The message to return</returns>
        private string GetMessage()
        {
            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(_message))
                return _message;
            if (MessageHost.EnableMessageTimestamp && MessageHost.EnableMessageBreadcrumbs)
                _message = String.Format("[{0}]{1}{2}", _timestamp.ToString("HH:mm:ss"), _BreadCrumbsString, GetMessageSimple());
            else if (MessageHost.EnableMessageTimestamp && MessageHost.EnableMessageDisplayCommand)
                _message = String.Format("[{0}][{1}] {2}", _timestamp.ToString("HH:mm:ss"), FunctionName, GetMessageSimple());
            else if (MessageHost.EnableMessageTimestamp)
                _message = String.Format("[{0}] {1}", _timestamp.ToString("HH:mm:ss"), GetMessageSimple());
            else if (MessageHost.EnableMessageBreadcrumbs)
                _message = String.Format("{0}{1}", _BreadCrumbsString, GetMessageSimple());
            else if (MessageHost.EnableMessageDisplayCommand)
                _message = String.Format("[{0}] {1}", FunctionName, GetMessageSimple());
            else
                _message = GetMessageSimple();

            return _message;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Builds the base message for internal system use.
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>The message to return</returns>
        private string GetMessageSimple()
        {
            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(_messageSimple))
                return _messageSimple;

            string baseMessage = _errorQualifiedMessage;
            foreach (Match match in Regex.Matches(baseMessage, "<c=[\"'](.*?)[\"']>(.*?)</c>"))
                baseMessage = Regex.Replace(baseMessage, Regex.Escape(match.Value), match.Groups[2].Value);
            _messageSimple = baseMessage;

            return _messageSimple;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Builds the message item if needed and returns it
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>The message to return</returns>
        private string GetMessageColor()
        {
            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(_messageColor))
                return _messageColor;

            if (MessageHost.EnableMessageTimestamp && MessageHost.EnableMessageBreadcrumbs)
                _messageColor = String.Format("[<c='sub'>{0}</c>]{1} {2}", _timestamp.ToString("HH:mm:ss"), _BreadCrumbsStringColored, _errorQualifiedMessage);
            else if (MessageHost.EnableMessageTimestamp && MessageHost.EnableMessageDisplayCommand)
                _messageColor = String.Format("[<c='sub'>{0}</c>][<c='sub'>{1}</c>] {2}", _timestamp.ToString("HH:mm:ss"), FunctionName, _errorQualifiedMessage);
            else if (MessageHost.EnableMessageTimestamp)
                _messageColor = String.Format("[<c='sub'>{0}</c>] {1}", _timestamp.ToString("HH:mm:ss"), _errorQualifiedMessage);
            else if (MessageHost.EnableMessageBreadcrumbs)
                _messageColor = String.Format("{0}{1}", _BreadCrumbsStringColored, _errorQualifiedMessage);
            else if (MessageHost.EnableMessageDisplayCommand)
                _messageColor = String.Format("[<c='sub'>{0}</c>] {1}", FunctionName, _errorQualifiedMessage);
            else
                _messageColor = _errorQualifiedMessage;

            return _messageColor;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Non-host output in developermode
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>The string to write on messages that don't go straight to Write-HostColor</returns>
        private string GetMessageDeveloper()
        {
            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(_messageDeveloper))
                return _messageDeveloper;

            string targetString = "";
            if (Target != null)
            {
                if (Target.ToString() != Target.GetType().FullName)
                    targetString = String.Format(" [T: {0}] ", Target.ToString());
                else
                    targetString = String.Format(" [T: <{0}>] ", Target.GetType().Name);
            }

            List<string> channelList = new List<string>();
            if (!_silent)
            {
                if (Level == MessageLevel.Warning)
                    channelList.Add("Warning");
                if ((MessageHost.MaximumInformation >= (int)Level) && (MessageHost.MinimumInformation <= (int)Level))
                    channelList.Add("Information");
            }
            if ((MessageHost.MaximumVerbose >= (int)Level) && (MessageHost.MinimumVerbose <= (int)Level))
                channelList.Add("Verbose");
            if ((MessageHost.MaximumDebug >= (int)Level) && (MessageHost.MinimumDebug <= (int)Level))
                channelList.Add("Debug");

            _messageDeveloper = String.Format(@"[{0}][{1}][L: {2}]{3}[C: {4}][EE: {5}][O: {6}]
    {7}", _timestamp.ToString("HH:mm:ss"), FunctionName, Level, targetString, String.Join(",", channelList), EnableException, (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(Once)), GetMessageSimple());

            return _messageDeveloper;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Host output in developermode
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>The string to write on messages that go straight to Write-HostColor</returns>
        private string GetMessageDeveloperColor()
        {
            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(_messageDeveloperColor))
                return _messageDeveloperColor;

            string targetString = "";
            if (Target != null)
            {
                if (Target.ToString() != Target.GetType().FullName)
                    targetString = String.Format(" [<c='sub'>T:</c> <c='em'>{0}</c>] ", Target.ToString());
                else
                    targetString = String.Format(" [<c='sub'>T:</c> <c='em'><{0}></c>] ", Target.GetType().Name);
            }

            List<string> channelList = new List<string>();
            if (!_silent)
            {
                if (Level == MessageLevel.Warning)
                    channelList.Add("Warning");
                if ((MessageHost.MaximumInformation >= (int)Level) && (MessageHost.MinimumInformation <= (int)Level))
                    channelList.Add("Information");
            }
            if ((MessageHost.MaximumVerbose >= (int)Level) && (MessageHost.MinimumVerbose <= (int)Level))
                channelList.Add("Verbose");
            if ((MessageHost.MaximumDebug >= (int)Level) && (MessageHost.MinimumDebug <= (int)Level))
                channelList.Add("Debug");

            _messageDeveloperColor = String.Format(@"[<c='sub'>{0}</c>][<c='sub'>{1}</c>][<c='sub'>L:</c> <c='em'>{2}</c>]{3}[<c='sub'>C: <c='em'>{4}</c>][<c='sub'>EE: <c='em'>{5}</c>][<c='sub'>O: <c='em'>{6}</c>]
    {7}", _timestamp.ToString("HH:mm:ss"), FunctionName, Level, targetString, String.Join(",", channelList), EnableException, (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(Once)), _errorQualifiedMessage);

            return _messageDeveloperColor;
        }
        #endregion Helper methods
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\Computer\DiskSpace.cs
using Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Utility;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Computer
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Data Container for the output of Get-DbaDiskSpace
    /// </summary>
    public class DiskSpace
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The computer that was scanned
        /// </summary>
        public string ComputerName { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// Name of the disk
        /// </summary>
        public string Name { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// Label of the disk
        /// </summary>
        public string Label { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// What's the total capacity of the disk?
        /// </summary>
        public Size Capacity { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// How much is still free?
        /// </summary>
        public Size Free { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// How much is still free
        /// </summary>
        public double PercentFree
        {
            get
            {
                return Math.Round((double)((double)Free.Byte / (double)Capacity.Byte * 100), 2);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// What blocksize is the object set to
        /// </summary>
        public int BlockSize { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// What filesystem is installed on the system
        /// </summary>
        public string FileSystem { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// What kind of drive is it?
        /// </summary>
        public DriveType Type { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether the drive is a sql disk. Nullable, because it is an optional property and may not always be included, thus a third state is necessary.
        /// </summary>
        public Nullable<bool> IsSqlDisk { get; set; }

        #region Legacy Properties
        /// <summary>
        /// The computer that was scanned. Legacy-Name
        /// </summary>
        public string Server
        {
            get { return ComputerName; }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The type of drive this is in the legacy string notation
        /// </summary>
        public string DriveType
        {
            get
            {
                switch (Type)
                {
                    case Computer.DriveType.Unknown:
                        return "Unknown";
                    case Computer.DriveType.NoRootDirectory:
                        return "No Root Directory";
                    case Computer.DriveType.RemovableDisk:
                        return "Removable Disk";
                    case Computer.DriveType.LocalDisk:
                        return "Local Disk";
                    case Computer.DriveType.NetworkDrive:
                        return "Network Drive";
                    case Computer.DriveType.CompactDisk:
                        return "Compact Disk";
                    case Computer.DriveType.RAMDisk:
                        return "RAM Disk";
                    default:
                        return "Unknown";
                }
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The total capacity in Bytes
        /// </summary>
        public double SizeInBytes
        {
            get
            {
                return Capacity.Byte;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The free space in Bytes
        /// </summary>
        public double FreeInBytes
        {
            get
            {
                return Free.Byte;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The total capacity in KB
        /// </summary>
        public double SizeInKB
        {
            get
            {
                return Math.Round(Capacity.Kilobyte, 2);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The free space in KB
        /// </summary>
        public double FreeInKB
        {
            get
            {
                return Math.Round(Free.Kilobyte, 2);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The total capacity in MB
        /// </summary>
        public double SizeInMB
        {
            get
            {
                return Math.Round(Capacity.Megabyte, 2);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The free space in MB
        /// </summary>
        public double FreeInMB
        {
            get
            {
                return Math.Round(Free.Megabyte, 2);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The total capacity in GB
        /// </summary>
        public double SizeInGB
        {
            get
            {
                return Math.Round(Capacity.Gigabyte, 2);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The free space in GB
        /// </summary>
        public double FreeInGB
        {
            get
            {
                return Math.Round(Free.Gigabyte, 2);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The total capacity in TB
        /// </summary>
        public double SizeInTB
        {
            get
            {
                return Math.Round(Capacity.Terabyte, 2);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The free space in TB
        /// </summary>
        public double FreeInTB
        {
            get
            {
                return Math.Round(Free.Terabyte, 2);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The total capacity in PB
        /// </summary>
        public double SizeInPB
        {
            get
            {
                return Math.Round(Capacity.Terabyte / 1024, 2);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The free space in PB
        /// </summary>
        public double FreeInPB
        {
            get
            {
                return Math.Round(Free.Terabyte / 1024, 2);
            }
        }
        #endregion Legacy Properties
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\Computer\DriveType.cs
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Computer
{
    /// <summary>
    /// What kind of drive are you?
    /// </summary>
    public enum DriveType
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The drive type is not actually known
        /// </summary>
        Unknown = 0,

        /// <summary>
        /// The drive has no root directory
        /// </summary>
        NoRootDirectory = 1,

        /// <summary>
        /// The drive is a removable disk
        /// </summary>
        RemovableDisk = 2,

        /// <summary>
        /// The drive is a local disk
        /// </summary>
        LocalDisk = 3,

        /// <summary>
        /// The drive is a network drive
        /// </summary>
        NetworkDrive = 4,

        /// <summary>
        /// The drive is a compact disk
        /// </summary>
        CompactDisk = 5,

        /// <summary>
        /// The drive is a RAM disk
        /// </summary>
        RAMDisk = 6,
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\Computer\PageFileSetting.cs
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Computer
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Data container, listing pagefile settings.
    /// </summary>
    [Serializable]
    public class PageFileSetting
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The name of the computer
        /// </summary>
        public string ComputerName;

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether Automatic PageFile management is enabled
        /// </summary>
        public bool AutoPageFile;

        /// <summary>
        /// The pagefile name
        /// </summary>
        public string FileName;

        /// <summary>
        /// The pagefile status
        /// </summary>
        public string Status;

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether the pagefile is system managed
        /// </summary>
        public Nullable<Boolean> SystemManaged;

        /// <summary>
        /// When were the settings last changed
        /// </summary>
        public Nullable<DateTime> LastModified;

        /// <summary>
        /// When were the settings last accessed
        /// </summary>
        public Nullable<DateTime> LastAccessed;

        /// <summary>
        /// The base allocated pagefile size in MB
        /// </summary>
        public Nullable<int> AllocatedBaseSize;

        /// <summary>
        /// The initial pagefile size in MB
        /// </summary>
        public Nullable<int> InitialSize;

        /// <summary>
        /// The maximum pagefile size in MB
        /// </summary>
        public Nullable<int> MaximumSize;

        /// <summary>
        /// The maximum percent of the pagefile limit that has been used
        /// </summary>
        public Nullable<int> PeakUsage;

        /// <summary>
        /// The currently used percentage of the pagefile limit that is in use.
        /// </summary>
        public Nullable<int> CurrentUsage;
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\Configuration\Config.cs
using System;
using System.Management.Automation;

namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Configuration
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Configuration Manager as well as individual configuration object.
    /// </summary>
    [Serializable]
    public class Config
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The Name of the setting
        /// </summary>
        public string Name { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// The full name of the configuration entry, comprised of both Module and Name.
        /// </summary>
        public string FullName
        {
            get { return Module + "." + Name; }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The module of the setting. Helps being able to group configurations.
        /// </summary>
        public string Module { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// A description of the specific setting
        /// </summary>
        public string Description { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// The data type of the value stored in the configuration element.
        /// </summary>
        public string Type
        {
            get
            {
                if (Value == null)
                    return null;
                return Value.GetType().FullName;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The value stored in the configuration element
        /// </summary>
        public Object Value { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// The handler script that is run whenever the configuration value is set.
        /// </summary>
        public ScriptBlock Handler { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// Validates the user input
        /// </summary>
        public ScriptBlock Validation { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// Setting this to true will cause the element to not be discovered unless using the '-Force' parameter on "Get-DbaConfig"
        /// </summary>
        public bool Hidden { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether the setting has been initialized. This handles module imports and avoids modules overwriting settings when imported in multiple runspaces.
        /// </summary>
        public bool Initialized { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether this setting was set by policy
        /// </summary>
        public bool PolicySet { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether this setting was set by policy and forbids deletion.
        /// </summary>
        public bool PolicyEnforced
        {
            get { return _PolicyEnforced; }
            set
            {
                if (_PolicyEnforced == false) { _PolicyEnforced = value; }
            }
        }
        private bool _PolicyEnforced = false;

        /// <summary>
        /// The finalized value to put into the registry value when using policy to set this setting.
        /// </summary>
        public string RegistryData
        {
            get
            {
                switch (Type)
                {
                    case "System.Boolean":
                        if ((bool)Value)
                            return "bool:true";
                        return "bool:false";
                    case "System.Int16":
                        return String.Format("int:{0}", Value);
                    case "System.Int32":
                        return String.Format("int:{0}", Value);
                    case "System.Int64":
                        return String.Format("long:{0}", Value);
                    case "System.UInt16":
                        return String.Format("int:{0}", Value);
                    case "System.UInt32":
                        return String.Format("long:{0}", Value);
                    case "System.UInt64":
                        return String.Format("long:{0}", Value);
                    case "System.Double":
                        return String.Format("double:{0}", Value);
                    case "System.String":
                        return String.Format("string:{0}", Value);
                    case "System.TimeSpan":
                        return String.Format("timespan:{0}", ((TimeSpan)Value).Ticks);
                    case "System.DateTime":
                        return String.Format("datetime:{0}", ((DateTime)Value).Ticks);
                    case "System.ConsoleColor":
                        return String.Format("consolecolor:{0}", Value);
                    default:
                        return "<type not supported>";
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\diagnosticquery\SQLServerDiagnosticQueries_2016_201807.sql

-- SQL Server 2016 Diagnostic Information Queries
-- Glenn Berry 
-- Last Modified: August 2, 2018
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/
-- http://sqlserverperformance.wordpress.com/
-- Twitter: GlennAlanBerry

-- Please listen to my Pluralsight courses
-- https://www.pluralsight.com/author/glenn-berry

-- If you want to find all of our SQLskills SQL101 blog posts, check out https://www.sqlskills.com/help/sql101/


-- Please make sure you are using the correct version of these diagnostic queries for your version of SQL Server


-- If you like PowerShell, there is a very useful community solution for running these queries in an automated fashion
-- https://dbatools.io/

-- Invoke-DbaDiagnosticQuery
-- https://dbatools.io/functions/invoke-dbadiagnosticquery/


--******************************************************************************
--*   Copyright (C) 2018 Glenn Berry, SQLskills.com
--*   All rights reserved. 
--*
--*   For more scripts and sample code, check out 
--*      https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn
--*
--*   You may alter this code for your own *non-commercial* purposes. You may
--*   republish altered code as long as you include this copyright and give due credit. 
--*
--*
--*   THIS CODE AND INFORMATION ARE PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF 
--*   ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED 
--*   TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND/OR FITNESS FOR A
--*   PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
--*
--******************************************************************************

-- Check the major product version to see if it is SQL Server 2016 CTP 2 or greater
IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * WHERE CONVERT(varchar(128), SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion')) LIKE '13%')
	BEGIN
		DECLARE @ProductVersion varchar(128) = CONVERT(varchar(128), SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion'));
		RAISERROR ('Script does not match the ProductVersion [%s] of this instance. Many of these queries may not work on this version.' , 18 , 16 , @ProductVersion);
	END
	ELSE
		PRINT N'You have the correct major version of SQL Server for this diagnostic information script';
	

-- Instance level queries *******************************

-- SQL and OS Version information for current instance  (Query 1) (Version Info)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], @@VERSION AS [SQL Server and OS Version Info];
------

-- SQL Server 2016 RTM Branch Builds								-- SQL Server 2016 SP1 Branch Builds                     -- SQL Server 2016 SP2 Branch Builds										
-- Build			Description			Release Date				Build			Description			Release Date	     Build			Description			Release Date			
-- 13.0.200.172		CTP 2.0				5/26/2015
-- 13.0.300.44		CTP 2.1				6/14/2015
-- 13.0.407.1		CTP 2.2				7/28/2015
-- 13.0.500.53		CTP 2.3				9/4/2015
-- 13.0.600.65		CTP 2.4				9/30/2015
-- 13.0.700.242		CTP 3.0				10/29/2015
-- 13.0.900.73		CTP 3.2				12/12/2015
-- 13.0.1000.276	CTP 3.3				1/27/2016
-- 13.0.1100.288	RC0					3/2/2016
-- 13.0.1200.242	RC1					3/18/2016 
-- 13.0.1300.275	RC2					3/28/2016
-- 13.0.1400.361	RC3					4/11/2016
-- 13.0.1601.5		RTM					6/1/2016
-- 13.0.1708.0		RTM-GDR				6/12/2016
-- 13.0.2149.0		RTM CU1				7/25/2016
-- 13.0.2164.0		RTM CU2				9/22/2016
-- 13.0.2186.0		RTM CU3				11/16/2016	---->			13.0.4001.0		SP1 RTM				 11/16/2016
-- 13.0.2193.0		RTM CU4				1/18/2017   ---->			13.0.4411.0		SP1 CU1				 1/18/2017
-- 13.0.2197.0		RTM CU5				3/20/2017   ---->			13.0.4422.0		SP1 CU2				 3/20/2017
-- 13.0.2204.0		RTM CU6				5/15/2017   ---->			13.0.4435.0		SP1 CU3				 5/15/2017
-- 13.0.2210.0		RTM CU7				8/8/2017    ---->			13.0.4446.0		SP1 CU4				  8/8/2017
-- 13.0.2213.0		RTM CU8				9/18/2017   ---->           13.0.4451.0		SP1 CU5				 9/18/2017
-- 13.0.2216.0		RTM CU9				11/21/2017  ---->			13.0.4457.0		SP1 CU6				 11/21/2017
--																	13.0.4466.4		SP1 CU7				  1/4/2018
--																	13.0.4474.0		SP1 CU8				  3/20/2018	---->	13.0.5026.0		SP2 RTM				4/24/2018
--                                                                  13.0.4502.0		SP1 CU9				  5/30/2018 ---->   13.0.5149.0		SP2 CU1				5/30/2018
--                                                                  13.0.4514.0     SP1 CU10			  7/16/2018 ---->   13.0.5153.0     SP2 CU2				7/16/2018


-- How to determine the version, edition and update level of SQL Server and its components 
-- https://bit.ly/2oAjKgW														

-- How to obtain the latest Service Pack for SQL Server 2016
-- https://bit.ly/2egtfzK

-- Microsoft SQL Server 2016 SP1 Latest Cumulative Update
-- https://bit.ly/2jTwxWC

-- SQL Server 2016 build versions 
-- https://bit.ly/2epkTDT

-- Where to find information about the latest SQL Server builds
-- https://bit.ly/2IGHbfY

-- Performance and Stability Related Fixes in Post-SQL Server 2016 SP1 Builds
-- https://bit.ly/2gr7k9L

-- Performance and Stability Related Fixes in Post-SQL Server 2016 SP2 Builds
-- https://bit.ly/2K3LoPf			

-- Announcing updates to the SQL Server Incremental Servicing Model (ISM)
-- https://bit.ly/1RzYITz

-- Update Center for Microsoft SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2pZptuQ

-- Download SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS)
-- https://bit.ly/1OcupT9

-- Download and install Microsoft SQL Operations Studio 
-- https://bit.ly/2vgke1A
	


-- Get socket, physical core and logical core count from the SQL Server Error log. (Query 2) (Core Counts)
-- This query might take a few seconds depending on the size of your error log
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'detected', N'socket';
------

-- This can help you determine the exact core counts used by SQL Server and whether HT is enabled or not
-- It can also help you confirm your SQL Server licensing model
-- Be on the lookout for this message "using 40 logical processors based on SQL Server licensing" 
-- (when you have more than 40 logical cores) which means grandfathered Server/CAL licensing
-- This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was last started



-- Get selected server properties (Query 3) (Server Properties)
SELECT SERVERPROPERTY('MachineName') AS [MachineName], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ServerName') AS [ServerName],  
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceName') AS [Instance], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsClustered') AS [IsClustered], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS') AS [ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS], 
SERVERPROPERTY('Edition') AS [Edition], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductLevel') AS [ProductLevel],				-- What servicing branch (RTM/SP/CU)
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductUpdateLevel') AS [ProductUpdateLevel],	-- Within a servicing branch, what CU# is applied
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion') AS [ProductVersion],
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductMajorVersion') AS [ProductMajorVersion], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductMinorVersion') AS [ProductMinorVersion], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductBuild') AS [ProductBuild], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductBuildType') AS [ProductBuildType],			  -- Is this a GDR or OD hotfix (NULL if on a CU build)
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductUpdateReference') AS [ProductUpdateReference], -- KB article number that is applicable for this build
SERVERPROPERTY('ProcessID') AS [ProcessID],
SERVERPROPERTY('Collation') AS [Collation], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsFullTextInstalled') AS [IsFullTextInstalled], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsIntegratedSecurityOnly') AS [IsIntegratedSecurityOnly],
SERVERPROPERTY('FilestreamConfiguredLevel') AS [FilestreamConfiguredLevel],
SERVERPROPERTY('IsHadrEnabled') AS [IsHadrEnabled], 
SERVERPROPERTY('HadrManagerStatus') AS [HadrManagerStatus],
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceDefaultDataPath') AS [InstanceDefaultDataPath],
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceDefaultLogPath') AS [InstanceDefaultLogPath],
SERVERPROPERTY('BuildClrVersion') AS [Build CLR Version],
SERVERPROPERTY('IsXTPSupported') AS [IsXTPSupported],
SERVERPROPERTY('IsPolybaseInstalled') AS [IsPolybaseInstalled],				-- New for SQL Server 2016
SERVERPROPERTY('IsAdvancedAnalyticsInstalled') AS [IsRServicesInstalled];	-- New for SQL Server 2016
------

-- This gives you a lot of useful information about your instance of SQL Server,
-- such as the ProcessID for SQL Server and your collation
-- Note: Some columns will be NULL on older SQL Server builds

-- SERVERPROPERTY (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2eeaXeI



-- Get instance-level configuration values for instance  (Query 4) (Configuration Values)
SELECT name, value, value_in_use, minimum, maximum, [description], is_dynamic, is_advanced
FROM sys.configurations WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Focus on these settings:
-- automatic soft-NUMA disabled (should be 0 in most cases)
-- backup checksum default (should be 1)
-- backup compression default (should be 1 in most cases)
-- clr enabled (only enable if it is needed)
-- cost threshold for parallelism (depends on your workload)
-- lightweight pooling (should be zero)
-- max degree of parallelism (depends on your workload and hardware)
-- max server memory (MB) (set to an appropriate value, not the default)
-- optimize for ad hoc workloads (should be 1)
-- priority boost (should be zero)
-- remote admin connections (should be 1)

-- New configuration options for SQL Server 2016
-- allow polybase export (Allow INSERT into a Hadoop external table)
-- automatic soft-NUMA disabled (Automatic soft-NUMA is enabled by default)
-- external scripts enabled (Allows execution of external scripts, for R Services)
-- hadoop connectivity (Configure SQL Server to connect to external Hadoop or Microsoft Azure storage blob data sources through PolyBase)
-- polybase network encryption (Configure SQL Server to encrypt control and data channels when using PolyBase)
-- remote data archive (Allow the use of the REMOTE_DATA_ARCHIVE data access for Stretch databases)

-- SQLSweet16!, Episode 1: Backup Compression for TDE-enabled Databases
-- https://bit.ly/28Rpb2x



-- Returns a list of all global trace flags that are enabled (Query 5) (Global Trace Flags)
DBCC TRACESTATUS (-1);
------

-- If no global trace flags are enabled, no results will be returned.
-- It is very useful to know what global trace flags are currently enabled as part of the diagnostic process.

-- Common trace flags that should be enabled in most cases
-- TF 3226 - Supresses logging of successful database backup messages to the SQL Server Error Log
--           https://bit.ly/2p6MTjS

-- TF 6534 - Enables use of native code to improve performance with spatial data
--           https://bit.ly/2HrQUpU

-- The behavior of TF 1117, 1118 are enabled for tempdb in SQL Server 2016 by default
-- SQL 2016 � It Just Runs Faster: -T1117 and -T1118 changes for TEMPDB and user databases
-- https://bit.ly/2lbNWxK           

-- The behavior of TF 2371 is enabled by default in SQL Server 2016 and newer (in compat level 130 and higher)

-- DBCC TRACEON - Trace Flags (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2FuSvPg



-- Returns status of instant file initialization (Query 6) (IFI Status)
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'Database Instant File Initialization';
------

-- Lets you determine whether Instant File Initialization (IFI) is enabled for the instance
-- This should be enabled in the vast majority of cases
-- SQL Server 2016 lets you enable this during the SQL server installation process

-- Database Instant File Initialization
-- https://bit.ly/2nTX74y

-- Misconceptions around instant file initialization
-- https://bit.ly/2oBSKgZ



-- SQL Server Process Address space info  (Query 7) (Process Memory)
-- (shows whether locked pages is enabled, among other things)
SELECT physical_memory_in_use_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Memory Usage (MB)],
	   locked_page_allocations_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Locked Pages Allocation (MB)],
       large_page_allocations_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Large Pages Allocation (MB)], 
	   page_fault_count, memory_utilization_percentage, available_commit_limit_kb, 
	   process_physical_memory_low, process_virtual_memory_low
FROM sys.dm_os_process_memory WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You want to see 0 for process_physical_memory_low
-- You want to see 0 for process_virtual_memory_low
-- This indicates that you are not under internal memory pressure
-- If locked_page_allocations_kb > 0, then LPIM is enabled

-- How to enable the "locked pages" feature in SQL Server 2012
-- https://bit.ly/2F5UjOA

-- Memory Management Architecture Guide
-- https://bit.ly/2JKkadC 



-- SQL Server Services information (Query 8) (SQL Server Services Info)
SELECT servicename, process_id, startup_type_desc, status_desc, 
last_startup_time, service_account, is_clustered, cluster_nodename, [filename], 
instant_file_initialization_enabled -- New in SQL Server 2016 SP1
FROM sys.dm_server_services WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you the account being used for the SQL Server Service and the SQL Agent Service
-- Shows the process_id, when they were last started, and their current status
-- Also shows whether you are running on a failover cluster instance, and what node you are running on
-- Also shows whether IFI is enabled

-- sys.dm_server_services (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2oKa1Un


-- Last backup information by database  (Query 9) (Last Backup By Database)
SELECT ISNULL(d.[name], bs.[database_name]) AS [Database], d.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model], 
       d.log_reuse_wait_desc AS [Log Reuse Wait Desc],
    MAX(CASE WHEN [type] = 'D' THEN bs.backup_finish_date ELSE NULL END) AS [Last Full Backup],
    MAX(CASE WHEN [type] = 'I' THEN bs.backup_finish_date ELSE NULL END) AS [Last Differential Backup],
    MAX(CASE WHEN [type] = 'L' THEN bs.backup_finish_date ELSE NULL END) AS [Last Log Backup]
FROM sys.databases AS d WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.backupset AS bs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON bs.[database_name] = d.[name] 
AND bs.backup_finish_date > GETDATE()- 30
WHERE d.name <> N'tempdb'
GROUP BY ISNULL(d.[name], bs.[database_name]), d.recovery_model_desc, d.log_reuse_wait_desc, d.[name] 
ORDER BY d.recovery_model_desc, d.[name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you spot runaway transaction logs and other issues with your backup schedule


-- Get SQL Server Agent jobs and Category information (Query 10) (SQL Server Agent Jobs)
SELECT sj.name AS [Job Name], sj.[description] AS [Job Description], SUSER_SNAME(sj.owner_sid) AS [Job Owner],
sj.date_created AS [Date Created], sj.[enabled] AS [Job Enabled], 
sj.notify_email_operator_id, sj.notify_level_email, sc.name AS [CategoryName],
s.[enabled] AS [Sched Enabled], js.next_run_date, js.next_run_time
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobs AS sj WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.syscategories AS sc WITH (NOLOCK)
ON sj.category_id = sc.category_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobschedules AS js WITH (NOLOCK)
ON sj.job_id = js.job_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysschedules AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON js.schedule_id = s.schedule_id
ORDER BY sj.name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some basic information about your SQL Server Agent jobs, who owns them and how they are configured
-- Look for Agent jobs that are not owned by sa
-- Look for jobs that have a notify_email_operator_id set to 0 (meaning no operator)
-- Look for jobs that have a notify_level_email set to 0 (meaning no e-mail is ever sent)
--
-- MSDN sysjobs documentation
-- https://bit.ly/2paDEOP 

-- SQL Server Maintenance Solution
-- https://bit.ly/1pgchQu  


-- Get SQL Server Agent Alert Information (Query 11) (SQL Server Agent Alerts)
SELECT name, event_source, message_id, severity, [enabled], has_notification, 
       delay_between_responses, occurrence_count, last_occurrence_date, last_occurrence_time
FROM msdb.dbo.sysalerts WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some basic information about your SQL Server Agent Alerts 
-- (which are different from SQL Server Agent jobs)
-- Read more about Agent Alerts here: https://bit.ly/2Giz0Xf 



-- Windows information (Query 12) (Windows Info)
SELECT windows_release, windows_service_pack_level, 
       windows_sku, os_language_version
FROM sys.dm_os_windows_info WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you major OS version, Service Pack, Edition, and language info for the operating system
-- 10.0 is either Windows 10 or Windows Server 2016
-- 6.3 is either Windows 8.1 or Windows Server 2012 R2 
-- 6.2 is either Windows 8 or Windows Server 2012


-- Windows SKU codes
-- 4 is Enterprise Edition
-- 7 is Standard Server Edition
-- 8 is Datacenter Server Edition
-- 10 is Enterprise Server Edition
-- 48 is Professional Edition
-- 161 is Pro for Workstations

-- 1033 for os_language_version is US-English

-- SQL Server 2016 requires Windows Server 2012 or newer

-- Quick-Start Installation of SQL Server 2016
-- https://bit.ly/2qtxQ3G

-- Hardware and Software Requirements for Installing SQL Server 2016
-- https://bit.ly/2JJIUTl

-- Using SQL Server in Windows 8 and later versions of Windows operating system 
-- https://bit.ly/2F7Ax0P


-- SQL Server NUMA Node information  (Query 13) (SQL Server NUMA Info)
SELECT node_id, node_state_desc, memory_node_id, processor_group, online_scheduler_count, 
       idle_scheduler_count, active_worker_count, avg_load_balance, resource_monitor_state
FROM sys.dm_os_nodes WITH (NOLOCK) 
WHERE node_state_desc <> N'ONLINE DAC' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some useful information about the composition and relative load on your NUMA nodes
-- You want to see an equal number of schedulers on each NUMA node
-- Watch out if SQL Server 2016 Standard Edition has been installed 
-- on a physical or virtual machine with more than four sockets or more than 24 physical cores

-- sys.dm_os_nodes (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pn5Mw8

-- Balancing Your Available SQL Server Core Licenses Evenly Across NUMA Nodes
-- https://bit.ly/2vfC4Rq



-- Good basic information about OS memory amounts and state  (Query 14) (System Memory)
SELECT total_physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Physical Memory (MB)], 
       available_physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Available Memory (MB)], 
       total_page_file_kb/1024 AS [Total Page File (MB)], 
	   available_page_file_kb/1024 AS [Available Page File (MB)], 
	   system_cache_kb/1024 AS [System Cache (MB)],
       system_memory_state_desc AS [System Memory State]
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_memory WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You want to see "Available physical memory is high" for System Memory State
-- This indicates that you are not under external memory pressure

-- Possible System Memory State values:
-- Available physical memory is high
-- Physical memory usage is steady
-- Available physical memory is low
-- Available physical memory is running low
-- Physical memory state is transitioning

-- sys.dm_os_sys_memory (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pcV0xq



-- You can skip the next two queries if you know you don't have a clustered instance


-- Get information about your cluster nodes and their status  (Query 15) (Cluster Node Properties)
-- (if your database server is in a failover cluster)
SELECT NodeName, status_description, is_current_owner
FROM sys.dm_os_cluster_nodes WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Knowing which node owns the cluster resources is critical
-- Especially when you are installing Windows or SQL Server updates
-- You will see no results if your instance is not clustered

-- Recommended hotfixes and updates for Windows Server 2012 R2-based failover clusters
-- https://bit.ly/1z5BfCw


-- Get information about any AlwaysOn AG cluster this instance is a part of (Query 16) (AlwaysOn AG Cluster)
SELECT cluster_name, quorum_type_desc, quorum_state_desc
FROM sys.dm_hadr_cluster WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You will see no results if your instance is not using AlwaysOn AGs


-- Good overview of AG health and status (Query 17) (AlwaysOn AG Status)
SELECT ag.name AS [AG Name], ar.replica_server_name, ar.availability_mode_desc, adc.[database_name], 
       drs.is_local, drs.is_primary_replica, drs.synchronization_state_desc, drs.is_commit_participant, 
	   drs.synchronization_health_desc, drs.recovery_lsn, drs.truncation_lsn, drs.last_sent_lsn, 
	   drs.last_sent_time, drs.last_received_lsn, drs.last_received_time, drs.last_hardened_lsn, 
	   drs.last_hardened_time, drs.last_redone_lsn, drs.last_redone_time, drs.log_send_queue_size, 
	   drs.log_send_rate, drs.redo_queue_size, drs.redo_rate, drs.filestream_send_rate, 
	   drs.end_of_log_lsn, drs.last_commit_lsn, drs.last_commit_time, drs.database_state_desc 
FROM sys.dm_hadr_database_replica_states AS drs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.availability_databases_cluster AS adc WITH (NOLOCK)
ON drs.group_id = adc.group_id 
AND drs.group_database_id = adc.group_database_id
INNER JOIN sys.availability_groups AS ag WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ag.group_id = drs.group_id
INNER JOIN sys.availability_replicas AS ar WITH (NOLOCK)
ON drs.group_id = ar.group_id 
AND drs.replica_id = ar.replica_id
ORDER BY ag.name, ar.replica_server_name, adc.[database_name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);

-- You will see no results if your instance is not using AlwaysOn AGs

-- SQL Server 2016 � It Just Runs Faster: Always On Availability Groups Turbocharged
-- https://bit.ly/2dn1H6r


-- Hardware information from SQL Server 2016  (Query 18) (Hardware Info)
SELECT cpu_count AS [Logical CPU Count], scheduler_count, 
       hyperthread_ratio AS [Hyperthread Ratio],
       cpu_count/hyperthread_ratio AS [Physical CPU Count], 
       physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Physical Memory (MB)], 
	   committed_kb/1024 AS [Committed Memory (MB)],
       committed_target_kb/1024 AS [Committed Target Memory (MB)],
       max_workers_count AS [Max Workers Count], 
	   affinity_type_desc AS [Affinity Type], 
       sqlserver_start_time AS [SQL Server Start Time], 
	   virtual_machine_type_desc AS [Virtual Machine Type],
	   softnuma_configuration_desc AS [Soft NUMA Configuration], 
	   sql_memory_model_desc -- New in SQL Server 2016
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some good basic hardware information about your database server
-- Note: virtual_machine_type_desc of HYPERVISOR does not automatically mean you are running SQL Server inside of a VM
-- It merely indicates that you have a hypervisor running on your host

-- sys.dm_os_sys_info (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pczOYs

-- Soft NUMA configuration was a new column for SQL Server 2016
-- OFF = Soft-NUMA feature is OFF
-- ON = SQL Server automatically determines the NUMA node sizes for Soft-NUMA
-- MANUAL = Manually configured soft-NUMA

-- Configure SQL Server to Use Soft-NUMA (SQL Server)
-- https://bit.ly/2HTpKJt

-- sql_memory_model_desc values (Added in SQL Server 2016 SP1)
-- CONVENTIONAL
-- LOCK_PAGES
-- LARGE_PAGES
   

-- Get System Manufacturer and model number from SQL Server Error log (Query 19) (System Manufacturer)
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'Manufacturer';
------ 

-- This can help you determine the capabilities and capacities of your database server
-- Can also be used to confirm if you are running in a VM
-- This query might take a few seconds if you have not recycled your error log recently
-- This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was started


-- Get BIOS date from Windows Registry (Query 20) (BIOS Date)
EXEC sys.xp_instance_regread N'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE', N'HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\BIOS', N'BiosReleaseDate';
------

-- Helps you understand whether the main system BIOS is up to date, and the possible age of the hardware
-- Not as useful for virtualization


-- Get processor description from Windows Registry  (Query 21) (Processor Description)
EXEC sys.xp_instance_regread N'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE', N'HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\CentralProcessor\0', N'ProcessorNameString';
------

-- Gives you the model number and rated clock speed of your processor(s)
-- Your processors may be running at less than the rated clock speed due
-- to the Windows Power Plan or hardware power management

-- You can use CPU-Z to get your actual CPU core speed and a lot of other useful information
-- https://bit.ly/QhR6xF

-- You can learn more about processor selection for SQL Server by following this link
-- https://bit.ly/2F3aVlP



-- See if buffer pool extension (BPE) is enabled (Query 22) (BPE Configuration)
SELECT [path], state_description, current_size_in_kb, 
CAST(current_size_in_kb/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10,2)) AS [Size (GB)]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_pool_extension_configuration WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- BPE is available in both Standard Edition and Enterprise Edition
-- It is a more interesting feature for Standard Edition

-- Buffer Pool Extension to SSDs in SQL Server 2014
-- https://bit.ly/1bm08m8

-- Buffer Pool Extension
-- https://bit.ly/2oBuieO



-- Look at buffer descriptors to see BPE usage by database (Query 23) (BPE Usage) 
SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name], COUNT(page_id) AS [Page Count],
CAST(COUNT(*)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Buffer size(MB)], 
AVG(read_microsec) AS [Avg Read Time (microseconds)]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE database_id <> 32767
AND is_in_bpool_extension = 1
GROUP BY DB_NAME(database_id) 
ORDER BY [Buffer size(MB)] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You will see no results if BPE is not enabled or if there is no BPE usage


-- Get information on location, time and size of any memory dumps from SQL Server  (Query 24) (Memory Dump Info)
SELECT [filename], creation_time, size_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS [Size (MB)]
FROM sys.dm_server_memory_dumps WITH (NOLOCK) 
ORDER BY creation_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This will not return any rows if you have 
-- not had any memory dumps (which is a good thing)

-- sys.dm_server_memory_dumps (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2elwWll



-- Look at Suspect Pages table (Query 25) (Suspect Pages)
SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name], [file_id], page_id, 
       event_type, error_count, last_update_date 
FROM msdb.dbo.suspect_pages WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY database_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- event_type value descriptions
-- 1 = 823 error caused by an operating system CRC error
--     or 824 error other than a bad checksum or a torn page (for example, a bad page ID)
-- 2 = Bad checksum
-- 3 = Torn page
-- 4 = Restored (The page was restored after it was marked bad)
-- 5 = Repaired (DBCC repaired the page)
-- 7 = Deallocated by DBCC

-- Ideally, this query returns no results. The table is limited to 1000 rows.
-- If you do get results here, you should do further investigation to determine the root cause

-- Manage the suspect_pages Table
-- https://bit.ly/2Fvr1c9


-- Get number of data files in tempdb database (Query 26) (TempDB Data Files)
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'The tempdb database has';
------

-- Get the number of data files in the tempdb database
-- 4-8 data files that are all the same size is a good starting point
-- This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was last started


-- File names and paths for all user and system databases on instance  (Query 27) (Database Filenames and Paths)
SELECT DB_NAME([database_id]) AS [Database Name], 
       [file_id], [name], physical_name, [type_desc], state_desc,
	   is_percent_growth, growth,
	   CONVERT(bigint, growth/128.0) AS [Growth in MB], 
       CONVERT(bigint, size/128.0) AS [Total Size in MB]
FROM sys.master_files WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY DB_NAME([database_id]), [file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Things to look at:
-- Are data files and log files on different drives?
-- Is everything on the C: drive?
-- Is tempdb on dedicated drives?
-- Is there only one tempdb data file?
-- Are all of the tempdb data files the same size?
-- Are there multiple data files for user databases?
-- Is percent growth enabled for any files (which is bad)?


-- Volume info for all LUNS that have database files on the current instance (Query 28) (Volume Info)
SELECT DISTINCT vs.volume_mount_point, vs.file_system_type, vs.logical_volume_name, 
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.total_bytes/1073741824.0) AS [Total Size (GB)],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.available_bytes/1073741824.0) AS [Available Size (GB)],  
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.available_bytes * 1. / vs.total_bytes * 100.) AS [Space Free %],
vs.supports_compression, vs.is_compressed, 
vs.supports_sparse_files, vs.supports_alternate_streams
FROM sys.master_files AS f WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_os_volume_stats(f.database_id, f.[file_id]) AS vs 
ORDER BY vs.volume_mount_point OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Shows you the total and free space on the LUNs where you have database files
-- Being low on free space can negatively affect performance

-- sys.dm_os_volume_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2oBPNNr



-- Drive level latency information (Query 29) (Drive Level Latency)
-- Based on code from Jimmy May
SELECT tab.[Drive], tab.volume_mount_point AS [Volume Mount Point], 
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_reads = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall_read_ms/num_of_reads) 
	END AS [Read Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_writes = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall_write_ms/num_of_writes) 
	END AS [Write Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN (num_of_reads = 0 AND num_of_writes = 0) THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall/(num_of_reads + num_of_writes)) 
	END AS [Overall Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_reads = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (num_of_bytes_read/num_of_reads) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Read],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_writes = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (num_of_bytes_written/num_of_writes) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Write],
	CASE 
		WHEN (num_of_reads = 0 AND num_of_writes = 0) THEN 0 
		ELSE ((num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/(num_of_reads + num_of_writes)) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Transfer]
FROM (SELECT LEFT(UPPER(mf.physical_name), 2) AS Drive, SUM(num_of_reads) AS num_of_reads,
	         SUM(io_stall_read_ms) AS io_stall_read_ms, SUM(num_of_writes) AS num_of_writes,
	         SUM(io_stall_write_ms) AS io_stall_write_ms, SUM(num_of_bytes_read) AS num_of_bytes_read,
	         SUM(num_of_bytes_written) AS num_of_bytes_written, SUM(io_stall) AS io_stall, vs.volume_mount_point 
      FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS vfs
      INNER JOIN sys.master_files AS mf WITH (NOLOCK)
      ON vfs.database_id = mf.database_id AND vfs.file_id = mf.file_id
	  CROSS APPLY sys.dm_os_volume_stats(mf.database_id, mf.[file_id]) AS vs 
      GROUP BY LEFT(UPPER(mf.physical_name), 2), vs.volume_mount_point) AS tab
ORDER BY [Overall Latency] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Shows you the drive-level latency for reads and writes, in milliseconds
-- Latency above 30-40ms is usually a problem
-- These latency numbers include all file activity against all SQL Server 
-- database files on each drive since SQL Server was last started


-- Calculates average stalls per read, per write, and per total input/output for each database file  (Query 30) (IO Stalls by File)
SELECT DB_NAME(fs.database_id) AS [Database Name], CAST(fs.io_stall_read_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_read_stall_ms],
CAST(fs.io_stall_write_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_write_stall_ms],
CAST((fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms)/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_io_stall_ms],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), mf.size/128.0) AS [File Size (MB)], mf.physical_name, mf.type_desc, fs.io_stall_read_ms, fs.num_of_reads, 
fs.io_stall_write_ms, fs.num_of_writes, fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms AS [io_stalls], fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes AS [total_io],
io_stall_queued_read_ms AS [Resource Governor Total Read IO Latency (ms)], io_stall_queued_write_ms AS [Resource Governor Total Write IO Latency (ms)] 
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(null,null) AS fs
INNER JOIN sys.master_files AS mf WITH (NOLOCK)
ON fs.database_id = mf.database_id
AND fs.[file_id] = mf.[file_id]
ORDER BY avg_io_stall_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database files on the entire instance have the most I/O bottlenecks
-- This can help you decide whether certain LUNs are overloaded and whether you might
-- want to move some files to a different location or perhaps improve your I/O performance
-- These latency numbers include all file activity against each SQL Server 
-- database file since SQL Server was last started


-- Look for I/O requests taking longer than 15 seconds in the six most recent SQL Server Error Logs (Query 31) (IO Warnings)
CREATE TABLE #IOWarningResults(LogDate datetime, ProcessInfo sysname, LogText nvarchar(1000));

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 1, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 2, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 3, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 4, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 5, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

SELECT LogDate, ProcessInfo, LogText
FROM #IOWarningResults
ORDER BY LogDate DESC;

DROP TABLE #IOWarningResults;
------  

-- Finding 15 second I/O warnings in the SQL Server Error Log is useful evidence of
-- poor I/O performance (which might have many different causes)
-- Look to see if you see any patterns in the results (same files, same drives, same time of day, etc.)

-- Diagnostics in SQL Server help detect stalled and stuck I/O operations
-- https://bit.ly/2qtaw73



-- Recovery model, log reuse wait description, log file size, log usage size  (Query 32) (Database Properties)
-- and compatibility level for all databases on instance
SELECT db.[name] AS [Database Name], SUSER_SNAME(db.owner_sid) AS [Database Owner], db.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model], 
db.state_desc, db.containment_desc, db.log_reuse_wait_desc AS [Log Reuse Wait Description], 
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), ls.cntr_value/1024.0) AS [Log Size (MB)], CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), lu.cntr_value/1024.0) AS [Log Used (MB)],
CAST(CAST(lu.cntr_value AS FLOAT) / CAST(ls.cntr_value AS FLOAT)AS DECIMAL(18,2)) * 100 AS [Log Used %], 
db.[compatibility_level] AS [DB Compatibility Level], 
db.is_mixed_page_allocation_on, db.page_verify_option_desc AS [Page Verify Option], 
db.is_auto_create_stats_on, db.is_auto_update_stats_on, db.is_auto_update_stats_async_on, db.is_parameterization_forced, 
db.snapshot_isolation_state_desc, db.is_read_committed_snapshot_on, db.is_auto_close_on, db.is_auto_shrink_on, 
db.target_recovery_time_in_seconds, db.is_cdc_enabled, db.is_published, db.is_distributor, db.is_encrypted,
db.group_database_id, db.replica_id,db.is_memory_optimized_elevate_to_snapshot_on, 
db.delayed_durability_desc, db.is_auto_create_stats_incremental_on,
db.is_query_store_on, db.is_sync_with_backup, 
db.is_supplemental_logging_enabled, db.is_remote_data_archive_enabled,
db.is_encrypted, de.encryption_state, de.percent_complete, de.key_algorithm, de.key_length      
FROM sys.databases AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS lu WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.name = lu.instance_name
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS ls WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.name = ls.instance_name
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_database_encryption_keys AS de WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.database_id = de.database_id
WHERE lu.counter_name LIKE N'Log File(s) Used Size (KB)%' 
AND ls.counter_name LIKE N'Log File(s) Size (KB)%'
AND ls.cntr_value > 0 
ORDER BY db.[name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Things to look at:
-- How many databases are on the instance?
-- What recovery models are they using?
-- What is the log reuse wait description?
-- How full are the transaction logs?
-- What compatibility level are the databases on? 
-- What is the Page Verify Option? (should be CHECKSUM)
-- Is Auto Update Statistics Asynchronously enabled?
-- Is Delayed Durability enabled
-- Make sure auto_shrink and auto_close are not enabled!

-- is_mixed_page_allocation_on is a new property for SQL Server 2016. Equivalent to TF 1118 for a user database
-- SQL Server 2016: Changes in default behavior for autogrow and allocations for tempdb and user databases
-- https://bit.ly/2evRZSR

-- A non-zero value for target_recovery_time_in_seconds means that indirect checkpoint is enabled 
-- If the setting has a zero value it indicates that automatic checkpoint is enabled

-- Changes in SQL Server 2016 Checkpoint Behavior
-- https://bit.ly/2pdggk3


-- Missing Indexes for all databases by Index Advantage  (Query 33) (Missing Indexes All Databases)
SELECT CONVERT(decimal(18,2), user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01)) AS [index_advantage],
FORMAT(migs.last_user_seek, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss') AS [last_user_seek], 
mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement]) AS [missing_indexes_for_table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement], equality_columns) AS [similar_missing_indexes_for_table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, 
CONVERT(decimal(18,2), migs.avg_total_user_cost) AS [avg_total_user_cost], migs.avg_user_impact 
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Getting missing index information for all of the databases on the instance is very useful
-- Look at last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
-- Also look at avg_user_impact and avg_total_user_cost to help determine importance
-- SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware
-- Do not just blindly add indexes that show up from this query!!!

-- SQL Server Index Design Guide
-- https://bit.ly/2qtZr4N



-- Get VLF Counts for all databases on the instance (Query 34) (VLF Counts)
-- (adapted from Michelle Ufford) 
CREATE TABLE #VLFInfo (RecoveryUnitID int, FileID  int,
					   FileSize bigint, StartOffset bigint,
					   FSeqNo      bigint, [Status]    bigint,
					   Parity      bigint, CreateLSN   numeric(38));
	 
CREATE TABLE #VLFCountResults(DatabaseName sysname, VLFCount int);
	 
EXEC sp_MSforeachdb N'Use [?]; 

				INSERT INTO #VLFInfo 
				EXEC sp_executesql N''DBCC LOGINFO([?])''; 
	 
				INSERT INTO #VLFCountResults 
				SELECT DB_NAME(), COUNT(*) 
				FROM #VLFInfo; 

				TRUNCATE TABLE #VLFInfo;'
	 
SELECT DatabaseName, VLFCount  
FROM #VLFCountResults
ORDER BY VLFCount DESC;
	 
DROP TABLE #VLFInfo;
DROP TABLE #VLFCountResults;
------

-- High VLF counts can affect write performance to the log file
-- and they can make full database restores and crash recovery take much longer
-- Try to keep your VLF counts under 200 in most cases (depending on log file size)

-- Important change to VLF creation algorithm in SQL Server 2014
-- https://bit.ly/2Hsjbg4

-- SQL Server Transaction Log Architecture and Management Guide
-- https://bit.ly/2JjmQRZ




-- Get CPU utilization by database (Query 35) (CPU Usage by Database)
WITH DB_CPU_Stats
AS
(SELECT pa.DatabaseID, DB_Name(pa.DatabaseID) AS [Database Name], SUM(qs.total_worker_time/1000) AS [CPU_Time_Ms]
 FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
 CROSS APPLY (SELECT CONVERT(int, value) AS [DatabaseID] 
              FROM sys.dm_exec_plan_attributes(qs.plan_handle)
              WHERE attribute = N'dbid') AS pa
 GROUP BY DatabaseID)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY [CPU_Time_Ms] DESC) AS [CPU Rank],
       [Database Name], [CPU_Time_Ms] AS [CPU Time (ms)], 
       CAST([CPU_Time_Ms] * 1.0 / SUM([CPU_Time_Ms]) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5, 2)) AS [CPU Percent]
FROM DB_CPU_Stats
WHERE DatabaseID <> 32767 -- ResourceDB
ORDER BY [CPU Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database is using the most CPU resources on the instance


-- Get I/O utilization by database (Query 36) (IO Usage By Database)
WITH Aggregate_IO_Statistics
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(SUM(num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/1048576 AS DECIMAL(12, 2)) AS io_in_mb
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS [DM_IO_STATS]
GROUP BY database_id)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY io_in_mb DESC) AS [I/O Rank], [Database Name], io_in_mb AS [Total I/O (MB)],
       CAST(io_in_mb/ SUM(io_in_mb) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [I/O Percent]
FROM Aggregate_IO_Statistics
ORDER BY [I/O Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database is using the most I/O resources on the instance


-- Get total buffer usage by database for current instance  (Query 37) (Total Buffer Usage by Database)
-- This make take some time to run on a busy instance
WITH AggregateBufferPoolUsage
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(COUNT(*) * 8/1024.0 AS DECIMAL (10,2))  AS [CachedSize]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE database_id <> 32767 -- ResourceDB
GROUP BY DB_NAME(database_id))
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY CachedSize DESC) AS [Buffer Pool Rank], [Database Name], CachedSize AS [Cached Size (MB)],
       CAST(CachedSize / SUM(CachedSize) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [Buffer Pool Percent]
FROM AggregateBufferPoolUsage
ORDER BY [Buffer Pool Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you how much memory (in the buffer pool) 
-- is being used by each database on the instance


-- Clear Wait Stats with this command
-- DBCC SQLPERF('sys.dm_os_wait_stats', CLEAR);

-- Isolate top waits for server instance since last restart or wait statistics clear  (Query 38) (Top Waits)
WITH [Waits] 
AS (SELECT wait_type, wait_time_ms/ 1000.0 AS [WaitS],
          (wait_time_ms - signal_wait_time_ms) / 1000.0 AS [ResourceS],
           signal_wait_time_ms / 1000.0 AS [SignalS],
           waiting_tasks_count AS [WaitCount],
           100.0 *  wait_time_ms / SUM (wait_time_ms) OVER() AS [Percentage],
           ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY wait_time_ms DESC) AS [RowNum]
    FROM sys.dm_os_wait_stats WITH (NOLOCK)
    WHERE [wait_type] NOT IN (
        N'BROKER_EVENTHANDLER', N'BROKER_RECEIVE_WAITFOR', N'BROKER_TASK_STOP',
		N'BROKER_TO_FLUSH', N'BROKER_TRANSMITTER', N'CHECKPOINT_QUEUE',
        N'CHKPT', N'CLR_AUTO_EVENT', N'CLR_MANUAL_EVENT', N'CLR_SEMAPHORE',
        N'DBMIRROR_DBM_EVENT', N'DBMIRROR_EVENTS_QUEUE', N'DBMIRROR_WORKER_QUEUE',
		N'DBMIRRORING_CMD', N'DIRTY_PAGE_POLL', N'DISPATCHER_QUEUE_SEMAPHORE',
        N'EXECSYNC', N'FSAGENT', N'FT_IFTS_SCHEDULER_IDLE_WAIT', N'FT_IFTSHC_MUTEX',
        N'HADR_CLUSAPI_CALL', N'HADR_FILESTREAM_IOMGR_IOCOMPLETION', N'HADR_LOGCAPTURE_WAIT', 
		N'HADR_NOTIFICATION_DEQUEUE', N'HADR_TIMER_TASK', N'HADR_WORK_QUEUE',
        N'KSOURCE_WAKEUP', N'LAZYWRITER_SLEEP', N'LOGMGR_QUEUE', 
		N'MEMORY_ALLOCATION_EXT', N'ONDEMAND_TASK_QUEUE',
		N'PARALLEL_REDO_DRAIN_WORKER', N'PARALLEL_REDO_LOG_CACHE', N'PARALLEL_REDO_TRAN_LIST',
		N'PARALLEL_REDO_WORKER_SYNC', N'PARALLEL_REDO_WORKER_WAIT_WORK',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_HADR_LEASE_MECHANISM', N'PREEMPTIVE_SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_LIBRARYOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_COMOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_CRYPTOPS',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_PIPEOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_AUTHENTICATIONOPS',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_GENERICOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_VERIFYTRUST',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_FILEOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_DEVICEOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_QUERYREGISTRY',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_WRITEFILE',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_CALLBACKEXECUTE', N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_DISPATCHER',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_GETTARGETSTATE', N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_SESSIONCOMMIT',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_TARGETINIT', N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_TARGETFINALIZE',
        N'PWAIT_ALL_COMPONENTS_INITIALIZED', N'PWAIT_DIRECTLOGCONSUMER_GETNEXT',
		N'QDS_PERSIST_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP',
		N'QDS_ASYNC_QUEUE',
        N'QDS_CLEANUP_STALE_QUERIES_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP', N'REQUEST_FOR_DEADLOCK_SEARCH',
		N'RESOURCE_QUEUE', N'SERVER_IDLE_CHECK', N'SLEEP_BPOOL_FLUSH', N'SLEEP_DBSTARTUP',
		N'SLEEP_DCOMSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_MASTERDBREADY', N'SLEEP_MASTERMDREADY',
        N'SLEEP_MASTERUPGRADED', N'SLEEP_MSDBSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_SYSTEMTASK', N'SLEEP_TASK',
        N'SLEEP_TEMPDBSTARTUP', N'SNI_HTTP_ACCEPT', N'SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS_SLEEP',
		N'SQLTRACE_BUFFER_FLUSH', N'SQLTRACE_INCREMENTAL_FLUSH_SLEEP', N'SQLTRACE_WAIT_ENTRIES',
		N'WAIT_FOR_RESULTS', N'WAITFOR', N'WAITFOR_TASKSHUTDOWN', N'WAIT_XTP_HOST_WAIT',
		N'WAIT_XTP_OFFLINE_CKPT_NEW_LOG', N'WAIT_XTP_CKPT_CLOSE', N'WAIT_XTP_RECOVERY',
		N'XE_BUFFERMGR_ALLPROCESSED_EVENT', N'XE_DISPATCHER_JOIN',
        N'XE_DISPATCHER_WAIT', N'XE_LIVE_TARGET_TVF', N'XE_TIMER_EVENT')
    AND waiting_tasks_count > 0)
SELECT
    MAX (W1.wait_type) AS [WaitType],
	CAST (MAX (W1.Percentage) AS DECIMAL (5,2)) AS [Wait Percentage],
	CAST ((MAX (W1.WaitS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgWait_Sec],
    CAST ((MAX (W1.ResourceS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgRes_Sec],
    CAST ((MAX (W1.SignalS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgSig_Sec], 
    CAST (MAX (W1.WaitS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Wait_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.ResourceS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Resource_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.SignalS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Signal_Sec],
    MAX (W1.WaitCount) AS [Wait Count],
	CAST (N'https://www.sqlskills.com/help/waits/' + W1.wait_type AS XML) AS [Help/Info URL]
FROM Waits AS W1
INNER JOIN Waits AS W2
ON W2.RowNum <= W1.RowNum
GROUP BY W1.RowNum, W1.wait_type
HAVING SUM (W2.Percentage) - MAX (W1.Percentage) < 99 -- percentage threshold
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Cumulative wait stats are not as useful on an idle instance that is not under load or performance pressure

-- SQL Server Wait Types Library (Paul Randal)
-- https://bit.ly/2ePzYO2

-- The SQL Server Wait Type Repository
-- https://bit.ly/1afzfjC

-- Wait statistics, or please tell me where it hurts
-- https://bit.ly/2wsQHQE

-- SQL Server 2005 Performance Tuning using the Waits and Queues
-- https://bit.ly/1o2NFoF

-- sys.dm_os_wait_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2Hjq9Yl



-- Get a count of SQL connections by IP address (Query 39) (Connection Counts by IP Address)
SELECT ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name, 
COUNT(ec.session_id) AS [connection count] 
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions AS es WITH (NOLOCK) 
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_connections AS ec WITH (NOLOCK) 
ON es.session_id = ec.session_id 
GROUP BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name  
ORDER BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you figure where your database load is coming from
-- and verifies connectivity from other machines

-- Solving Connectivity errors to SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2EgzoD0



-- Get Average Task Counts (run multiple times)  (Query 40) (Avg Task Counts)
SELECT AVG(current_tasks_count) AS [Avg Task Count], 
AVG(work_queue_count) AS [Avg Work Queue Count],
AVG(runnable_tasks_count) AS [Avg Runnable Task Count],
AVG(pending_disk_io_count) AS [Avg Pending DiskIO Count]
FROM sys.dm_os_schedulers WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE scheduler_id < 255 OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Sustained values above 10 suggest further investigation in that area
-- High Avg Task Counts are often caused by blocking/deadlocking or other resource contention

-- Sustained values above 1 suggest further investigation in that area
-- High Avg Runnable Task Counts are a good sign of CPU pressure
-- High Avg Pending DiskIO Counts are a sign of disk pressure

-- How to Do Some Very Basic SQL Server Monitoring
-- https://bit.ly/2q3Btgt



-- Detect blocking (run multiple times)  (Query 41) (Detect Blocking)
SELECT t1.resource_type AS [lock type], DB_NAME(resource_database_id) AS [database],
t1.resource_associated_entity_id AS [blk object],t1.request_mode AS [lock req],  -- lock requested
t1.request_session_id AS [waiter sid], t2.wait_duration_ms AS [wait time],       -- spid of waiter  
(SELECT [text] FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r WITH (NOLOCK)                      -- get sql for waiter
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.[sql_handle]) 
WHERE r.session_id = t1.request_session_id) AS [waiter_batch],
(SELECT SUBSTRING(qt.[text],r.statement_start_offset/2, 
    (CASE WHEN r.statement_end_offset = -1 
    THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 
    ELSE r.statement_end_offset END - r.statement_start_offset)/2) 
FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.[sql_handle]) AS qt
WHERE r.session_id = t1.request_session_id) AS [waiter_stmt],					-- statement blocked
t2.blocking_session_id AS [blocker sid],										-- spid of blocker
(SELECT [text] FROM sys.sysprocesses AS p										-- get sql for blocker
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(p.[sql_handle]) 
WHERE p.spid = t2.blocking_session_id) AS [blocker_batch]
FROM sys.dm_tran_locks AS t1 WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_waiting_tasks AS t2 WITH (NOLOCK)
ON t1.lock_owner_address = t2.resource_address OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps troubleshoot blocking and deadlocking issues
-- The results will change from second to second on a busy system
-- You should run this query multiple times when you see signs of blocking



-- Get CPU Utilization History for last 256 minutes (in one minute intervals)  (Query 42) (CPU Utilization History)
DECLARE @ts_now bigint = (SELECT cpu_ticks/(cpu_ticks/ms_ticks) FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info WITH (NOLOCK)); 

SELECT TOP(256) SQLProcessUtilization AS [SQL Server Process CPU Utilization], 
               SystemIdle AS [System Idle Process], 
               100 - SystemIdle - SQLProcessUtilization AS [Other Process CPU Utilization], 
               DATEADD(ms, -1 * (@ts_now - [timestamp]), GETDATE()) AS [Event Time] 
FROM (SELECT record.value('(./Record/@id)[1]', 'int') AS record_id, 
			record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/SystemIdle)[1]', 'int') 
			AS [SystemIdle], 
			record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/ProcessUtilization)[1]', 'int') 
			AS [SQLProcessUtilization], [timestamp] 
	  FROM (SELECT [timestamp], CONVERT(xml, record) AS [record] 
			FROM sys.dm_os_ring_buffers WITH (NOLOCK)
			WHERE ring_buffer_type = N'RING_BUFFER_SCHEDULER_MONITOR' 
			AND record LIKE N'%<SystemHealth>%') AS x) AS y 
ORDER BY record_id DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at the trend over the entire period 
-- Also look at high sustained 'Other Process' CPU Utilization values
-- Note: This query sometimes gives inaccurate results (negative values)
-- on high core count (> 64 cores) systems


-- Get top total worker time queries for entire instance (Query 43) (Top Worker Time Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], 
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 255), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text],  
qs.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time], qs.min_worker_time AS [Min Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.max_worker_time AS [Max Worker Time], 
qs.min_elapsed_time AS [Min Elapsed Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time AS [Max Elapsed Time],
qs.min_logical_reads AS [Min Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.max_logical_reads AS [Max Logical Reads], 
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Helps you find the most expensive queries from a CPU perspective across the entire instance
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues



-- Page Life Expectancy (PLE) value for each NUMA node in current instance  (Query 44) (PLE by NUMA Node)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], RTRIM([object_name]) AS [Object Name], instance_name, cntr_value AS [Page Life Expectancy]
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N'%Buffer Node%' -- Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N'Page life expectancy' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- PLE is a good measurement of internal memory pressure
-- Higher PLE is better. Watch the trend over time, not the absolute value
-- This will only return one row for non-NUMA systems

-- Page Life Expectancy isn�t what you think�
-- https://bit.ly/2EgynLa


-- Memory Grants Pending value for current instance  (Query 45) (Memory Grants Pending)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], RTRIM([object_name]) AS [Object Name], cntr_value AS [Memory Grants Pending]                                                                                                       
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N'%Memory Manager%' -- Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N'Memory Grants Pending' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Run multiple times, and run periodically if you suspect you are under memory pressure
-- Memory Grants Pending above zero for a sustained period is a very strong indicator of internal memory pressure


-- Memory Clerk Usage for instance  (Query 46) (Memory Clerk Usage)
-- Look for high value for CACHESTORE_SQLCP (Ad-hoc query plans)
SELECT TOP(10) mc.[type] AS [Memory Clerk Type], 
       CAST((SUM(mc.pages_kb)/1024.0) AS DECIMAL (15,2)) AS [Memory Usage (MB)] 
FROM sys.dm_os_memory_clerks AS mc WITH (NOLOCK)
GROUP BY mc.[type]  
ORDER BY SUM(mc.pages_kb) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- MEMORYCLERK_SQLBUFFERPOOL was new for SQL Server 2012. It should be your highest consumer of memory

-- CACHESTORE_SQLCP  SQL Plans         
-- These are cached SQL statements or batches that aren't in stored procedures, functions and triggers
-- Watch out for high values for CACHESTORE_SQLCP
-- Enabling 'optimize for ad hoc workloads' at the instance level can help reduce this
-- Running DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE ('SQL Plans') periodically may be required to better control this

-- CACHESTORE_OBJCP  Object Plans      
-- These are compiled plans for stored procedures, functions and triggers



-- Find single-use, ad-hoc and prepared queries that are bloating the plan cache  (Query 47) (Ad hoc Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], t.[text] AS [Query Text], 
cp.objtype AS [Object Type], cp.cacheobjtype AS [Cache Object Type],  
cp.size_in_bytes/1024 AS [Plan Size in KB]
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t
WHERE cp.cacheobjtype = N'Compiled Plan' 
AND cp.objtype IN (N'Adhoc', N'Prepared') 
AND cp.usecounts = 1
ORDER BY cp.size_in_bytes DESC, DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you the text, type and size of single-use ad-hoc and prepared queries that waste space in the plan cache
-- Enabling 'optimize for ad hoc workloads' for the instance can help (SQL Server 2008 and above only)
-- Running DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE ('SQL Plans') periodically may be required to better control this
-- Enabling forced parameterization for the database can help, but test first!

-- Plan cache, adhoc workloads and clearing the single-use plan cache bloat
-- https://bit.ly/2EfYOkl


-- Get top total logical reads queries for entire instance (Query 48) (Top Logical Reads Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name],
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 255), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text], 
qs.total_logical_reads AS [Total Logical Reads],
qs.min_logical_reads AS [Min Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.max_logical_reads AS [Max Logical Reads],   
qs.min_worker_time AS [Min Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.max_worker_time AS [Max Worker Time], 
qs.min_elapsed_time AS [Min Elapsed Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time AS [Max Elapsed Time],
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count], 
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Helps you find the most expensive queries from a memory perspective across the entire instance
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues


-- Get top average elapsed time queries for entire instance (Query 49) (Top Avg Elapsed Time Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], 
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 255), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text],  
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
qs.min_elapsed_time, qs.max_elapsed_time, qs.last_elapsed_time,
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],  
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads], 
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Physical Reads], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you find the highest average elapsed time queries across the entire instance
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues


-- Look at UDF execution statistics (Query 50) (UDF Stats by DB)
SELECT TOP (25) DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name], 
		   OBJECT_NAME(object_id, database_id) AS [Function Name],
		   total_worker_time, execution_count, total_elapsed_time,  
           total_elapsed_time/execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],  
           last_elapsed_time, last_execution_time, cached_time 
FROM sys.dm_exec_function_stats WITH (NOLOCK) 
ORDER BY total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- sys.dm_exec_function_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2q1Q6BM



-- Database specific queries *****************************************************************

-- **** Please switch to a user database that you are interested in! *****
--USE YourDatabaseName; -- make sure to change to an actual database on your instance, not the master system database
--GO

-- Individual File Sizes and space available for current database  (Query 51) (File Sizes and Space)
SELECT f.name AS [File Name] , f.physical_name AS [Physical Name], 
CAST((f.size/128.0) AS DECIMAL(15,2)) AS [Total Size in MB],
CAST(f.size/128.0 - CAST(FILEPROPERTY(f.name, 'SpaceUsed') AS int)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(15,2)) 
AS [Available Space In MB], f.[file_id], fg.name AS [Filegroup Name],
f.is_percent_growth, f.growth, fg.is_default, fg.is_read_only, 
fg.is_autogrow_all_files -- New in SQL Server 2016
FROM sys.database_files AS f WITH (NOLOCK) 
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.filegroups AS fg WITH (NOLOCK)
ON f.data_space_id = fg.data_space_id
ORDER BY f.[file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at how large and how full the files are and where they are located
-- Make sure the transaction log is not full!!

-- is_autogrow_all_files is new for SQL Server 2016. Equivalent to TF 1117 for user databases

-- SQL Server 2016: Changes in default behavior for autogrow and allocations for tempdb and user databases
-- https://bit.ly/2evRZSR


-- Log space usage for current database  (Query 52) (Log Space Usage)
SELECT DB_NAME(lsu.database_id) AS [Database Name], db.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model],
		CAST(lsu.total_log_size_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Total Log Space (MB)],
		CAST(lsu.used_log_space_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Used Log Space (MB)], 
		CAST(lsu.used_log_space_in_percent AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Used Log Space %],
		CAST(lsu.log_space_in_bytes_since_last_backup/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Used Log Space Since Last Backup (MB)],
		db.log_reuse_wait_desc		 
FROM sys.dm_db_log_space_usage AS lsu WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.databases AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
ON lsu.database_id = db.database_id
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at log file size and usage, along with the log reuse wait description for the current database



-- Get database scoped configuration values for current database (Query 53) (Database-scoped Configurations)
SELECT configuration_id, name, [value] AS [value_for_primary], value_for_secondary
FROM sys.database_scoped_configurations WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This lets you see the value of these new properties for the current database

-- Clear plan cache for current database
-- ALTER DATABASE SCOPED CONFIGURATION CLEAR PROCEDURE_CACHE;

-- ALTER DATABASE SCOPED CONFIGURATION (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2sOH7nb


-- I/O Statistics by file for the current database  (Query 54) (IO Stats By File)
SELECT DB_NAME(DB_ID()) AS [Database Name], df.name AS [Logical Name], vfs.[file_id], df.type_desc,
df.physical_name AS [Physical Name], CAST(vfs.size_on_disk_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Size on Disk (MB)],
vfs.num_of_reads, vfs.num_of_writes, vfs.io_stall_read_ms, vfs.io_stall_write_ms,
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_read_ms/(vfs.io_stall_read_ms + vfs.io_stall_write_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_write_ms/(vfs.io_stall_write_ms + vfs.io_stall_read_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Writes Pct],
(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS [Writes + Reads], 
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_read/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Read], 
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_written/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Written],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_reads/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_writes/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Write Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_read/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Read Bytes Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_written/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Written Bytes Pct]
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(DB_ID(), NULL) AS vfs
INNER JOIN sys.database_files AS df WITH (NOLOCK)
ON vfs.[file_id]= df.[file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you characterize your workload better from an I/O perspective for this database
-- It helps you determine whether you has an OLTP or DW/DSS type of workload



-- Get most frequently executed queries for this database (Query 55) (Query Execution Counts)
SELECT TOP(50) LEFT(t.[text], 50) AS [Short Query Text], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
qs.total_logical_reads AS [Total Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time AS [Total Elapsed Time],
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
WHERE t.dbid = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Queries 56 through 61 are the "Bad Man List" for stored procedures

-- Top Cached SPs By Execution Count (Query 56) (SP Execution Counts)
SELECT TOP(100) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time],    
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you which cached stored procedures are called the most often
-- This helps you characterize and baseline your workload


-- Top Cached SPs By Avg Elapsed Time (Query 57) (SP Avg Elapsed Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.min_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time, qs.last_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], 
qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY avg_elapsed_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find high average elapsed time cached stored procedures that
-- may be easy to optimize with standard query tuning techniques



-- Top Cached SPs By Total Worker time. Worker time relates to CPU cost  (Query 58) (SP Worker Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a CPU perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of CPU pressure


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Reads. Logical reads relate to memory pressure  (Query 59) (SP Logical Reads)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_reads AS [TotalLogicalReads], 
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalReads],qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute], 
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a memory perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of memory pressure


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Physical Reads. Physical reads relate to disk read I/O pressure  (Query 60) (SP Physical Reads)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name],qs.total_physical_reads AS [TotalPhysicalReads], 
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgPhysicalReads], qs.execution_count, 
qs.total_logical_reads,qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan 
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND qs.total_physical_reads > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_physical_reads DESC, qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a read I/O perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of I/O pressure or of memory pressure
       


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Writes (Query 61) (SP Logical Writes)
-- Logical writes relate to both memory and disk I/O pressure 
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_writes AS [TotalLogicalWrites], 
qs.total_logical_writes/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalWrites], qs.execution_count,
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan 
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND qs.total_logical_writes > 0
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_writes DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a write I/O perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of I/O pressure or of memory pressure


-- Lists the top statements by average input/output usage for the current database  (Query 62) (Top IO Statements)
SELECT TOP(50) OBJECT_NAME(qt.objectid, dbid) AS [SP Name],
(qs.total_logical_reads + qs.total_logical_writes) /qs.execution_count AS [Avg IO], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
SUBSTRING(qt.[text],qs.statement_start_offset/2, 
	(CASE 
		WHEN qs.statement_end_offset = -1 
	 THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 
		ELSE qs.statement_end_offset 
	 END - qs.statement_start_offset)/2) AS [Query Text]	
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) AS qt
WHERE qt.[dbid] = DB_ID()
ORDER BY [Avg IO] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you find the most expensive statements for I/O by SP



-- Possible Bad NC Indexes (writes > reads)  (Query 63) (Bad NC Indexes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(s.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], i.name AS [Index Name], i.index_id, 
i.is_disabled, i.is_hypothetical, i.has_filter, i.fill_factor,
s.user_updates AS [Total Writes], s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads],
s.user_updates - (s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups) AS [Difference]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(s.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
AND s.user_updates > (s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups)
AND i.index_id > 1 AND i.[type_desc] = N'NONCLUSTERED'
AND i.is_primary_key = 0 AND i.is_unique_constraint = 0 AND i.is_unique = 0
ORDER BY [Difference] DESC, [Total Writes] DESC, [Total Reads] ASC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look for indexes with high numbers of writes and zero or very low numbers of reads
-- Consider your complete workload, and how long your instance has been running
-- Investigate further before dropping an index!


-- Missing Indexes for current database by Index Advantage  (Query 64) (Missing Indexes)
SELECT CONVERT(decimal(18,2), user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01)) AS [index_advantage], 
migs.last_user_seek, mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement]) AS [missing_indexes_for_table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement], equality_columns) AS [similar_missing_indexes_for_table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, 
CONVERT(decimal(18,2), migs.avg_total_user_cost) AS [avg_total_user_cost], migs.avg_user_impact,
OBJECT_NAME(mid.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], p.rows AS [Table Rows]
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = mid.[object_id]
WHERE mid.database_id = DB_ID()
AND p.index_id < 2 
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at index advantage, last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
-- SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware
-- Do not just blindly add indexes that show up from this query!!!


-- Find missing index warnings for cached plans in the current database  (Query 65) (Missing Index Warnings)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a busy instance
SELECT TOP(25) OBJECT_NAME(objectid) AS [ObjectName], 
               cp.objtype, cp.usecounts, cp.size_in_bytes, query_plan
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(cp.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE CAST(query_plan AS NVARCHAR(MAX)) LIKE N'%MissingIndex%'
AND dbid = DB_ID()
ORDER BY cp.usecounts DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you connect missing indexes to specific stored procedures or queries
-- This can help you decide whether to add them or not


-- Breaks down buffers used by current database by object (table, index) in the buffer cache  (Query 66) (Buffer Usage)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a busy instance
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) AS [Object Name], p.index_id, 
CAST(COUNT(*)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Buffer size(MB)],  
COUNT(*) AS [BufferCount], p.[Rows] AS [Row Count],
p.data_compression_desc AS [Compression Type]
FROM sys.allocation_units AS a WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors AS b WITH (NOLOCK)
ON a.allocation_unit_id = b.allocation_unit_id
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON a.container_id = p.hobt_id
WHERE b.database_id = CONVERT(int, DB_ID())
AND p.[object_id] > 100
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'plan_%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'xml_index_nodes%'
GROUP BY p.[object_id], p.index_id, p.data_compression_desc, p.[Rows]
ORDER BY [BufferCount] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you what tables and indexes are using the most memory in the buffer cache
-- It can help identify possible candidates for data compression


-- Get Table names, row counts, and compression status for clustered index or heap  (Query 67) (Table Sizes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS [ObjectName], 
SUM(Rows) AS [RowCount], data_compression_desc AS [CompressionType]
FROM sys.partitions WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE index_id < 2 --ignore the partitions from the non-clustered index if any
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'queue_%' 
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'filestream_tombstone%' 
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'fulltext%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'ifts_comp_fragment%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'filetable_updates%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'xml_index_nodes%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'sqlagent_job%'  
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'plan_persist%'  
GROUP BY object_id, data_compression_desc
ORDER BY SUM(Rows) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you an idea of table sizes, and possible data compression opportunities



-- Get some key table properties (Query 68) (Table Properties)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], p.[rows] AS [Table Rows], p.index_id, 
       p.data_compression_desc AS [Index Data Compression],
       t.create_date, t.lock_on_bulk_load, t.is_replicated, t.has_replication_filter, 
       t.is_tracked_by_cdc, t.lock_escalation_desc, t.is_filetable, 
	   t.is_memory_optimized, t.durability_desc, 
	   t.temporal_type_desc, t.is_remote_data_archive_enabled, t.is_external -- new for SQL Server 2016
FROM sys.tables AS t WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON t.[object_id] = p.[object_id]
WHERE OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
ORDER BY OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]), p.index_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some good information about your tables
-- is_memory_optimized and durability_desc were new in SQL Server 2014
-- temporal_type_desc, is_remote_data_archive_enabled, is_external are new in SQL Server 2016

-- sys.tables (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2Gk7998



-- When were Statistics last updated on all indexes?  (Query 69) (Statistics Update)
SELECT SCHEMA_NAME(o.Schema_ID) + N'.' + o.[NAME] AS [Object Name], o.[type_desc] AS [Object Type],
      i.[name] AS [Index Name], STATS_DATE(i.[object_id], i.index_id) AS [Statistics Date], 
      s.auto_created, s.no_recompute, s.user_created, s.is_incremental, s.is_temporary,
	  st.row_count, st.used_page_count
FROM sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON o.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id] 
AND i.index_id = s.stats_id
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_partition_stats AS st WITH (NOLOCK)
ON o.[object_id] = st.[object_id]
AND i.[index_id] = st.[index_id]
WHERE o.[type] IN ('U', 'V')
AND st.row_count > 0
ORDER BY STATS_DATE(i.[object_id], i.index_id) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------  

-- Helps discover possible problems with out-of-date statistics
-- Also gives you an idea which indexes are the most active

-- sys.stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2GyAxrn

-- UPDATEs to Statistics (Erin Stellato)
-- https://bit.ly/2vhrYQy



-- Look at most frequently modified indexes and statistics (Query 70) (Volatile Indexes)
SELECT o.[name] AS [Object Name], o.[object_id], o.[type_desc], s.[name] AS [Statistics Name], 
       s.stats_id, s.no_recompute, s.auto_created, s.is_incremental, s.is_temporary,
	   sp.modification_counter, sp.[rows], sp.rows_sampled, sp.last_updated
FROM sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.object_id = o.object_id
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_db_stats_properties(s.object_id, s.stats_id) AS sp
WHERE o.[type_desc] NOT IN (N'SYSTEM_TABLE', N'INTERNAL_TABLE')
AND sp.modification_counter > 0
ORDER BY sp.modification_counter DESC, o.name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you understand your workload and make better decisions about 
-- things like data compression and adding new indexes to a table



-- Get fragmentation info for all indexes above a certain size in the current database  (Query 71) (Index Fragmentation)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a very large database
SELECT DB_NAME(ps.database_id) AS [Database Name], SCHEMA_NAME(o.[schema_id]) AS [Schema Name],
OBJECT_NAME(ps.OBJECT_ID) AS [Object Name], i.[name] AS [Index Name], ps.index_id, 
ps.index_type_desc, ps.avg_fragmentation_in_percent, 
ps.fragment_count, ps.page_count, i.fill_factor, i.has_filter, 
i.filter_definition, i.[allow_page_locks]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats(DB_ID(),NULL, NULL, NULL , N'LIMITED') AS ps
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ps.[object_id] = i.[object_id] 
AND ps.index_id = i.index_id
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
WHERE ps.database_id = DB_ID()
AND ps.page_count > 2500
ORDER BY ps.avg_fragmentation_in_percent DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine whether you have framentation in your relational indexes
-- and how effective your index maintenance strategy is


--- Index Read/Write stats (all tables in current DB) ordered by Reads  (Query 72) (Overall Index Usage - Reads)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], i.[name] AS [IndexName], i.index_id, 
       s.user_seeks, s.user_scans, s.user_lookups,
	   s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads], 
	   s.user_updates AS [Writes],  
	   i.[type_desc] AS [Index Type], i.fill_factor AS [Fill Factor], i.has_filter, i.filter_definition, 
	   s.last_user_scan, s.last_user_lookup, s.last_user_seek
FROM sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(i.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
ORDER BY s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE); -- Order by reads
------

-- Show which indexes in the current database are most active for Reads


--- Index Read/Write stats (all tables in current DB) ordered by Writes  (Query 73) (Overall Index Usage - Writes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], i.[name] AS [IndexName], i.index_id,
	   s.user_updates AS [Writes], s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads], 
	   i.[type_desc] AS [Index Type], i.fill_factor AS [Fill Factor], i.has_filter, i.filter_definition,
	   s.last_system_update, s.last_user_update
FROM sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(i.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
ORDER BY s.user_updates DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);						 -- Order by writes
------

-- Show which indexes in the current database are most active for Writes


-- Get in-memory OLTP index usage (Query 74) (XTP Index Usage)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [Object Name], i.index_id, i.[name] AS [Index Name],
       i.[type_desc], xis.scans_started, xis.scans_retries, 
	   xis.rows_touched, xis.rows_returned
FROM sys.dm_db_xtp_index_stats AS xis WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = xis.[object_id] 
AND i.index_id = xis.index_id 
ORDER BY OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This gives you some index usage statistics for in-memory OLTP
-- Returns no data if you are not using in-memory OLTP

-- Guidelines for Using Indexes on Memory-Optimized Tables
-- https://bit.ly/2GCP8lF


-- Look at Columnstore index physical statistics (Query 75) (Columnstore Index Physical Stat)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(ps.object_id) AS [TableName],  
	i.[name] AS [IndexName], ps.index_id, ps.partition_number,
	ps.delta_store_hobt_id, ps.state_desc, ps.total_rows, ps.size_in_bytes,
	ps.trim_reason_desc, ps.generation, ps.transition_to_compressed_state_desc,
	ps.has_vertipaq_optimization, ps.deleted_rows,
	100 * (ISNULL(ps.deleted_rows, 0))/ps.total_rows AS [Fragmentation]
FROM sys.dm_db_column_store_row_group_physical_stats AS ps WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ps.object_id = i.object_id 
AND ps.index_id = i.index_id
ORDER BY ps.object_id, ps.partition_number, ps.row_group_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- sys.dm_db_column_store_row_group_physical_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2q276XQ


-- Get lock waits for current database (Query 76) (Lock Waits)
SELECT o.name AS [table_name], i.name AS [index_name], ios.index_id, ios.partition_number,
		SUM(ios.row_lock_wait_count) AS [total_row_lock_waits], 
		SUM(ios.row_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_row_lock_wait_in_ms],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_count) AS [total_page_lock_waits],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_page_lock_wait_in_ms],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms)+ SUM(row_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_lock_wait_in_ms]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_operational_stats(DB_ID(), NULL, NULL, NULL) AS ios
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ios.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ios.[object_id] = i.[object_id] 
AND ios.index_id = i.index_id
WHERE o.[object_id] > 100
GROUP BY o.name, i.name, ios.index_id, ios.partition_number
HAVING SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms)+ SUM(row_lock_wait_in_ms) > 0
ORDER BY total_lock_wait_in_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This query is helpful for troubleshooting blocking and deadlocking issues



-- Look at UDF execution statistics (Query 77) (UDF Statistics)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS [Function Name], execution_count,
	   total_worker_time, total_logical_reads, total_physical_reads, total_elapsed_time, 
	   total_elapsed_time/execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
	   FORMAT(cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
FROM sys.dm_exec_function_stats WITH (NOLOCK) 
WHERE database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE); 
------

-- New for SQL Server 2016
-- Helps you investigate scalar UDF performance issues
-- Does not return information for table valued functions

-- sys.dm_exec_function_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2q1Q6BM


-- Get Query Store Options for this database (Query 78) (QueryStore Options)
SELECT actual_state_desc, desired_state_desc, [interval_length_minutes],
       current_storage_size_mb, [max_storage_size_mb], 
	   query_capture_mode_desc, size_based_cleanup_mode_desc
FROM sys.database_query_store_options WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- New for SQL Server 2016
-- Requires that Query Store is enabled for this database

-- Tuning Workload Performance with Query Store
-- https://bit.ly/1kHSl7w


-- Get highest aggregate duration queries over last hour (Query 79) (High Aggregate Duration Queries)
WITH AggregatedDurationLastHour
AS
(SELECT q.query_id, SUM(count_executions * avg_duration) AS total_duration,
   COUNT (distinct p.plan_id) AS number_of_plans
   FROM sys.query_store_query_text AS qt WITH (NOLOCK)
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query AS q WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON qt.query_text_id = q.query_text_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_plan AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON q.query_id = p.query_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_runtime_stats AS rs WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON rs.plan_id = p.plan_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_runtime_stats_interval AS rsi WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON rsi.runtime_stats_interval_id = rs.runtime_stats_interval_id
   WHERE rsi.start_time >= DATEADD(hour, -1, GETUTCDATE()) 
   AND rs.execution_type_desc = N'Regular'
   GROUP BY q.query_id),
OrderedDuration AS
(SELECT query_id, total_duration, number_of_plans, 
 ROW_NUMBER () OVER (ORDER BY total_duration DESC, query_id) AS RN
 FROM AggregatedDurationLastHour)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(q.object_id) AS [Containing Object], qt.query_sql_text, 
od.total_duration AS [Total Duration (microsecs)], 
od.number_of_plans AS [Plan Count],
p.is_forced_plan, p.is_parallel_plan, p.is_trivial_plan,
q.query_parameterization_type_desc, p.[compatibility_level],
p.last_compile_start_time, q.last_execution_time,
CONVERT(xml, p.query_plan) AS query_plan_xml 
FROM OrderedDuration AS od 
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query AS q WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_id  = od.query_id
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query_text AS qt WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_text_id = qt.query_text_id
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_plan AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_id = p.query_id
WHERE od.RN <= 50 
ORDER BY total_duration DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- New for SQL Server 2016
-- Requires that QueryStore is enabled for this database


-- Get input buffer information for the current database (Query 80) (Input Buffer)
SELECT es.session_id, DB_NAME(es.database_id) AS [Database Name],
es.login_time, es.cpu_time, es.logical_reads,
es.[status], ib.event_info AS [Input Buffer]
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions AS es WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_input_buffer(es.session_id, NULL) AS ib
WHERE es.database_id = DB_ID()
AND es.session_id > 50
AND es.session_id <> @@SPID OPTION (RECOMPILE);

-- Gives you input buffer information from all non-system sessions for the current database
-- Replaces DBCC INPUTBUFFER

-- New DMF for retrieving input buffer in SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2uHKMbz



-- Look at recent Full backups for the current database (Query 81) (Recent Full Backups)
SELECT TOP (30) bs.machine_name, bs.server_name, bs.database_name AS [Database Name], bs.recovery_model,
CONVERT (BIGINT, bs.backup_size / 1048576 ) AS [Uncompressed Backup Size (MB)],
CONVERT (BIGINT, bs.compressed_backup_size / 1048576 ) AS [Compressed Backup Size (MB)],
CONVERT (NUMERIC (20,2), (CONVERT (FLOAT, bs.backup_size) /
CONVERT (FLOAT, bs.compressed_backup_size))) AS [Compression Ratio], bs.has_backup_checksums, bs.is_copy_only, bs.encryptor_type,
DATEDIFF (SECOND, bs.backup_start_date, bs.backup_finish_date) AS [Backup Elapsed Time (sec)],
bs.backup_finish_date AS [Backup Finish Date], bmf.physical_device_name AS [Backup Location], bmf.physical_block_size
FROM msdb.dbo.backupset AS bs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.backupmediafamily AS bmf WITH (NOLOCK)
ON bs.media_set_id = bmf.media_set_id  
WHERE bs.database_name = DB_NAME(DB_ID())
AND bs.[type] = 'D' -- Change to L if you want Log backups
ORDER BY bs.backup_finish_date DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Are your backup sizes and times changing over time?
-- Are you using backup compression?
-- Are you using backup checksums?
-- Are you doing copy_only backups?
-- Are you doing encrypted backups?
-- Have you done any backup tuning with striped backups, or changing the parameters of the backup command?

-- In SQL Server 2016, native SQL Server backup compression actually works much better with databases that are using TDE than in previous versions
-- https://bit.ly/28Rpb2x


-- These three Pluralsight Courses go into more detail about how to run these queries and interpret the results

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 1 
-- https://bit.ly/2plxCer

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 2
-- https://bit.ly/2IuJpzI

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 3
-- https://bit.ly/2FIlCPb



-- Sign up for Microsoft Visual Studio Dev Essentials and get a free three month pass to Pluralsight

-- Microsoft Visual Studio Dev Essentials
-- http://bit.ly/1q6xbDL


-- Sign up for Microsoft Azure Essentials and get lots of free Azure usage credits, MCP exam voucher, three month Pluralsight subscription

-- Microsoft Azure Essentials
-- https://bit.ly/2JMWe8x


-- August 2017 blog series about upgrading and migrating SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2ftKVrX



tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\Configuration\ConfigurationHost.cs
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Management.Automation;

namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Configuration
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Host class providing static configuration settings that are constant across all runspaces within the process.
    /// </summary>
    public static class ConfigurationHost
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Hashtable containing all the configuration entries
        /// </summary>
        public static Dictionary<string, Config> Configurations = new Dictionary<string, Config>();

        /// <summary>
        /// Hashtable containing all the registered validations
        /// </summary>
        public static Dictionary<string, ScriptBlock> Validation = new Dictionary<string, ScriptBlock>();

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether the import from registry has been completed. Prevents multiple imports and overwrites when importing the module multiple times.
        /// </summary>
        public static bool ImportFromRegistryDone { get; set; }
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\Connection\ConnectionHost.cs
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Management.Automation.Runspaces;

namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Connection
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Provides static tools for managing connections
    /// </summary>
    public static class ConnectionHost
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// List of all registered connections.
        /// </summary>
        public static Dictionary<string, ManagementConnection> Connections = new Dictionary<string, ManagementConnection>();

        #region Configuration Computer Management
        /// <summary>
        /// The time interval that must pass, before a connection using a known to not work connection protocol is reattempted
        /// </summary>
        public static TimeSpan BadConnectionTimeout = new TimeSpan(0, 15, 0);

        /// <summary>
        /// Globally disables all caching done by the Computer Management functions.
        /// </summary>
        public static bool DisableCache = false;

        /// <summary>
        /// Disables the caching of bad credentials. dbatools caches bad logon credentials for wmi/cim and will not reuse them.
        /// </summary>
        public static bool DisableBadCredentialCache = false;

        /// <summary>
        /// Disables the automatic registration of working credentials. dbatools will caches the last working credential when connecting using wmi/cim and will use those rather than using known bad credentials
        /// </summary>
        public static bool DisableCredentialAutoRegister = false;

        /// <summary>
        /// Enabling this will force the use of the last credentials known to work, rather than even trying explicit credentials.
        /// </summary>
        public static bool OverrideExplicitCredential = false;

        /// <summary>
        /// Enables automatic failover to working credentials, when passed credentials either are known, or turn out to not work.
        /// </summary>
        public static bool EnableCredentialFailover = false;

        /// <summary>
        /// Globally disables the persistence of Cim sessions used to connect to a target system.
        /// </summary>
        public static bool DisableCimPersistence = false;

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether the CM connection using Cim over WinRM is disabled globally
        /// </summary>
        public static bool DisableConnectionCimRM = false;

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether the CM connection using Cim over DCOM is disabled globally
        /// </summary>
        public static bool DisableConnectionCimDCOM = false;

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether the CM connection using WMI is disabled globally
        /// </summary>
        public static bool DisableConnectionWMI = true;

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether the CM connection using PowerShell Remoting is disabled globally
        /// </summary>
        public static bool DisableConnectionPowerShellRemoting = true;
        #endregion Configuration Computer Management

        #region Configuration Sql Connection
        /// <summary>
        /// The number of seconds before a sql connection attempt times out
        /// </summary>
        public static int SqlConnectionTimeout = 15;
        #endregion Configuration Sql Connection

        #region PowerShell remoting sessions
        /// <summary>
        /// List of all session containers used to maintain a cache
        /// </summary>
        public static Dictionary<Guid, PSSessionContainer> PSSessions = new Dictionary<Guid, PSSessionContainer>();

        #region Public operations
        /// <summary>
        /// Returns a registered session for a given computer on a given runspace. Returns null if nothing is registered.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Runspace">The host runspace that opened the session</param>
        /// <param name="ComputerName">The computer connected to</param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public static PSSession PSSessionGet(Guid Runspace, string ComputerName)
        {
            if (!PSSessions.ContainsKey(Runspace))
                return null;

            return PSSessions[Runspace].Get(ComputerName.ToLower());
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Registeres a remote session under the owning runspace in its respective computer name
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Runspace">The runspace that owns the session</param>
        /// <param name="ComputerName">The computer the session connects to</param>
        /// <param name="Session">The session object</param>
        public static void PSSessionSet(Guid Runspace, string ComputerName, PSSession Session)
        {
            if (!PSSessionCacheEnabled)
                return;

            if (!PSSessions.ContainsKey(Runspace))
                PSSessions[Runspace] = new PSSessionContainer(Runspace);

            PSSessions[Runspace].Set(ComputerName.ToLower(), Session);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Searches the cache for an expired remoting session and purges it. After purging it from the list, it still needs to be closed!
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>The session purged that then needs to be closed</returns>
        public static PSSession PSSessionPurgeExpired()
        {
            foreach (PSSessionContainer container in PSSessions.Values)
                if (container.CountExpired > 0)
                    return container.PurgeExpiredSession();

            return null;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The number of expired sessions 
        /// </summary>
        public static int PSSessionCountExpired
        {
            get
            {
                int num = 0;

                foreach (PSSessionContainer container in PSSessions.Values)
                    num += container.CountExpired;

                return num;
            }
        }
        #endregion Public operations

        #region Configuration
        /// <summary>
        /// The time until established connections will be considered expired (if available)
        /// </summary>
        public static TimeSpan PSSessionTimeout = new TimeSpan(0, 5, 0);

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether sessions should be cached at all
        /// </summary>
        public static bool PSSessionCacheEnabled = true;
        #endregion Configuration
        #endregion PowerShell remoting sessions
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\Connection\ManagementConnection.cs
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Management.Automation;
using Microsoft.Management.Infrastructure;
using Microsoft.Management.Infrastructure.Options;

namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Connection
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Contains management connection information for a windows server
    /// </summary>
    [Serializable]
    public class ManagementConnection
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The computer to connect to
        /// </summary>
        public string ComputerName { get; set; }

        #region Configuration

        /// <summary>
        /// Locally disables the caching of bad credentials
        /// </summary>
        public bool DisableBadCredentialCache
        {
            get
            {
                switch (_disableBadCredentialCache)
                {
                    case -1:
                        return false;
                    case 1:
                        return true;
                    default:
                        return ConnectionHost.DisableBadCredentialCache;
                }
            }
            set {
                _disableBadCredentialCache = value ? 1 : -1;
            }
        }

        private int _disableBadCredentialCache;

        /// <summary>
        /// Locally disables the caching of working credentials
        /// </summary>
        public bool DisableCredentialAutoRegister
        {
            get
            {
                switch (_disableCredentialAutoRegister)
                {
                    case -1:
                        return false;
                    case 1:
                        return true;
                    default:
                        return ConnectionHost.DisableCredentialAutoRegister;
                }
            }
            set
            {
                _disableCredentialAutoRegister = value ? 1 : -1;
            }
        }

        private int _disableCredentialAutoRegister;

        /// <summary>
        /// Locally overrides explicit credentials with working ones that were cached
        /// </summary>
        public bool OverrideExplicitCredential
        {
            get
            {
                switch (_overrideExplicitCredential)
                {
                    case -1:
                        return false;
                    case 1:
                        return true;
                    default:
                        return ConnectionHost.OverrideExplicitCredential;
                }
            }
            set
            {
                _overrideExplicitCredential = value ? 1 : -1;
                
            }
        }

        private int _overrideExplicitCredential;

        /// <summary>
        /// Locally enables automatic failover to working credentials, when passed credentials either are known, or turn out to not work.
        /// </summary>
        public bool EnableCredentialFailover
        {
            get
            {
                switch (_enableCredentialFailover)
                {
                    case -1:
                        return false;
                    case 1:
                        return true;
                    default:
                        return ConnectionHost.EnableCredentialFailover;
                }
            }
            set
            {
                _enableCredentialFailover = value ? 1 : -1;
            }
        }

        private int _enableCredentialFailover;

        /// <summary>
        /// Locally disables the persistence of Cim sessions used to connect to a target system.
        /// </summary>
        public bool DisableCimPersistence
        {
            get
            {
                switch (_disableCimPersistence)
                {
                    case -1:
                        return false;
                    case 1:
                        return true;
                    default:
                        return ConnectionHost.DisableCimPersistence;
                }
            }
            set
            {
                _disableCimPersistence = value ? 1 : -1;
            }
        }

        private int _disableCimPersistence;

        /// <summary>
        /// Connectiontypes that will never be used
        /// </summary>
        public ManagementConnectionType DisabledConnectionTypes
        {
            get
            {
                ManagementConnectionType temp = ManagementConnectionType.None;
                if (CimRM == ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled)
                {
                    temp = temp | ManagementConnectionType.CimRM;
                }
                if (CimDCOM == ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled)
                {
                    temp = temp | ManagementConnectionType.CimDCOM;
                }
                if (Wmi == ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled)
                {
                    temp = temp | ManagementConnectionType.Wmi;
                }
                if (PowerShellRemoting == ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled)
                {
                    temp = temp | ManagementConnectionType.PowerShellRemoting;
                }
                return temp;
            }
            set
            {
                if ((value & ManagementConnectionType.CimRM) != 0)
                {
                    CimRM = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled;
                }
                else if ((CimRM & ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled) != 0)
                {
                    CimRM = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Unknown;
                }
                if ((value & ManagementConnectionType.CimDCOM) != 0)
                {
                    CimDCOM = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled;
                }
                else if ((CimDCOM & ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled) != 0)
                {
                    CimDCOM = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Unknown;
                }
                if ((value & ManagementConnectionType.Wmi) != 0)
                {
                    Wmi = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled;
                }
                else if ((Wmi & ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled) != 0)
                {
                    Wmi = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Unknown;
                }
                if ((value & ManagementConnectionType.PowerShellRemoting) != 0)
                {
                    PowerShellRemoting = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled;
                }
                else if ((PowerShellRemoting & ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled) != 0)
                {
                    PowerShellRemoting = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Unknown;
                }
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Restores all deviations from public policy back to default
        /// </summary>
        public void RestoreDefaultConfiguration()
        {
            _disableBadCredentialCache = 0;
            _disableCredentialAutoRegister = 0;
            _overrideExplicitCredential = 0;
            _disableCimPersistence = 0;
            _enableCredentialFailover = 0;
            OverrideConnectionPolicy = false;
        }

        #endregion Configuration

        #region Connection Stats
        /// <summary>
        /// Whether this connection adhers to the global connection lockdowns or not
        /// </summary>
        public bool OverrideConnectionPolicy = false;

        /// <summary>
        /// Did the last connection attempt using CimRM work?
        /// </summary>
        public ManagementConnectionProtocolState CimRM
        {
            get
            {
                if (!OverrideConnectionPolicy && ConnectionHost.DisableConnectionCimRM)
                    return ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled;
                else
                    return _CimRM;
            }
            set { _CimRM = value; }
        }
        private ManagementConnectionProtocolState _CimRM = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Unknown;

        /// <summary>
        /// When was the last connection attempt using CimRM?
        /// </summary>
        public DateTime LastCimRM;

        /// <summary>
        /// Did the last connection attempt using CimDCOM work?
        /// </summary>
        public ManagementConnectionProtocolState CimDCOM
        {
            get
            {
                if (!OverrideConnectionPolicy && ConnectionHost.DisableConnectionCimDCOM)
                    return ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled;
                else
                    return _CimDCOM;
            }
            set { _CimDCOM = value; }
        }
        private ManagementConnectionProtocolState _CimDCOM = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Unknown;

        /// <summary>
        /// When was the last connection attempt using CimRM?
        /// </summary>
        public DateTime LastCimDCOM;

        /// <summary>
        /// Did the last connection attempt using Wmi work?
        /// </summary>
        public ManagementConnectionProtocolState Wmi
        {
            get
            {
                if (!OverrideConnectionPolicy && ConnectionHost.DisableConnectionWMI)
                    return ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled;
                else
                    return _Wmi;
            }
            set { _Wmi = value; }
        }
        private ManagementConnectionProtocolState _Wmi = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Unknown;

        /// <summary>
        /// When was the last connection attempt using CimRM?
        /// </summary>
        public DateTime LastWmi;

        /// <summary>
        /// Did the last connection attempt using PowerShellRemoting work?
        /// </summary>
        public ManagementConnectionProtocolState PowerShellRemoting
        {
            get
            {
                if (!OverrideConnectionPolicy && ConnectionHost.DisableConnectionPowerShellRemoting)
                    return ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled;
                else
                    return _PowerShellRemoting;
            }
            set { _PowerShellRemoting = value; }
        }
        private ManagementConnectionProtocolState _PowerShellRemoting = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Unknown;

        /// <summary>
        /// When was the last connection attempt using CimRM?
        /// </summary>
        public DateTime LastPowerShellRemoting;

        /// <summary>
        /// Report the successful connection against the computer of this connection
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Type">What connection type succeeded?</param>
        public void ReportSuccess(ManagementConnectionType Type)
        {
            switch (Type)
            {
                case ManagementConnectionType.CimRM:
                    CimRM = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Success;
                    LastCimRM = DateTime.Now;
                    break;

                case ManagementConnectionType.CimDCOM:
                    CimDCOM = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Success;
                    LastCimDCOM = DateTime.Now;
                    break;

                case ManagementConnectionType.Wmi:
                    Wmi = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Success;
                    LastWmi = DateTime.Now;
                    break;

                case ManagementConnectionType.PowerShellRemoting:
                    PowerShellRemoting = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Success;
                    LastPowerShellRemoting = DateTime.Now;
                    break;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Report the failure of connecting to the target computer
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Type">What connection type failed?</param>
        public void ReportFailure(ManagementConnectionType Type)
        {
            switch (Type)
            {
                case ManagementConnectionType.CimRM:
                    CimRM = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Error;
                    LastCimRM = DateTime.Now;
                    break;

                case ManagementConnectionType.CimDCOM:
                    CimDCOM = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Error;
                    LastCimDCOM = DateTime.Now;
                    break;

                case ManagementConnectionType.Wmi:
                    Wmi = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Error;
                    LastWmi = DateTime.Now;
                    break;

                case ManagementConnectionType.PowerShellRemoting:
                    PowerShellRemoting = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Error;
                    LastPowerShellRemoting = DateTime.Now;
                    break;
            }
        }

        #endregion Connection Stats

        #region Credential Management

        /// <summary>
        /// Any registered credentials to use on the connection.
        /// </summary>
        public PSCredential Credentials;

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether the default windows credentials are known to not work against the target.
        /// </summary>
        public bool WindowsCredentialsAreBad;

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether windows credentials are known to be good. Do not build conditions on them being false, just on true.
        /// </summary>
        public bool UseWindowsCredentials;

        /// <summary>
        /// Credentials known to not work. They will not be used when specified.
        /// </summary>
        public List<PSCredential> KnownBadCredentials = new List<PSCredential>();

        /// <summary>
        /// Adds a credentials object to the list of credentials known to not work.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Credential">The bad credential that must be punished</param>
        public void AddBadCredential(PSCredential Credential)
        {
            if (DisableBadCredentialCache)
                return;

            if (Credential == null)
            {
                WindowsCredentialsAreBad = true;
                UseWindowsCredentials = false;
                return;
            }

            // If previously good credentials have been revoked, better remove them from the list
            if ((Credentials != null) && (Credentials.UserName.ToLower() == Credential.UserName.ToLower()))
            {
                if (Credentials.GetNetworkCredential().Password == Credential.GetNetworkCredential().Password)
                    Credentials = null;
            }

            foreach (PSCredential cred in KnownBadCredentials)
            {
                if (cred.UserName.ToLower() == Credential.UserName.ToLower())
                {
                    if (cred.GetNetworkCredential().Password == Credential.GetNetworkCredential().Password)
                        return;
                }
            }
            KnownBadCredentials.Add(Credential);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Reports a credentials object as being legit.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Credential">The functioning credential that we may want to use again</param>
        public void AddGoodCredential(PSCredential Credential)
        {
            if (!DisableCredentialAutoRegister)
            {
                Credentials = Credential;
                if (Credential == null)
                {
                    UseWindowsCredentials = true;
                }
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Calculates, which credentials to use. Will consider input, compare it with know not-working credentials or use the configured working credentials for that.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Credential">Any credential object a user may have explicitly specified.</param>
        /// <returns>The Credentials to use</returns>
        public PSCredential GetCredential(PSCredential Credential)
        {
            // If nothing was bound, return whatever is available
            // If something was bound, however explicit override is in effect AND either we have a good credential OR know Windows Credentials are good to use, use the cached credential
            // Without the additional logic conditions, OverrideExplicitCredential would override all input, even if we haven't found a working credential yet.
            if (OverrideExplicitCredential && (UseWindowsCredentials || (Credentials != null)))
            {
                return Credentials;
            }

            // Handle Windows authentication
            if (Credential == null)
            {
                if (WindowsCredentialsAreBad)
                {
                    if (EnableCredentialFailover && (Credentials != null))
                        return Credentials;
                    throw new PSArgumentException("Windows authentication was used, but is known to not work!",
                        "Credential");
                }
                return null;
            }

            // Compare with bad credential cache
            if (!DisableBadCredentialCache)
            {
                foreach (PSCredential cred in KnownBadCredentials)
                {
                    if (cred.UserName.ToLower() == Credential.UserName.ToLower())
                    {
                        if (cred.GetNetworkCredential().Password == Credential.GetNetworkCredential().Password)
                        {
                            if (EnableCredentialFailover)
                            {
                                if ((Credentials != null) || !WindowsCredentialsAreBad)
                                    return Credentials;
                                throw new PSArgumentException(
                                    "Specified credentials are known to not work! Credential failover is enabled but there are no known working credentials.",
                                    "Credential");
                            }
                            throw new PSArgumentException("Specified credentials are known to not work!",
                                "Credential");
                        }
                    }
                }
            }

            // Return unknown credential, so it may be tried out
            return Credential;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Tests whether the input credential is on the list known, bad credentials
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Credential">The credential to test</param>
        /// <returns>True if the credential is known to not work, False if it is not yet known to not work</returns>
        public bool IsBadCredential(PSCredential Credential)
        {
            if (Credential == null)
            {
                return WindowsCredentialsAreBad;
            }

            foreach (PSCredential cred in KnownBadCredentials)
            {
                if (cred.UserName.ToLower() == Credential.UserName.ToLower())
                {
                    if (cred.GetNetworkCredential().Password == Credential.GetNetworkCredential().Password)
                        return true;
                }
            }

            return false;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Removes an item from the list of known bad credentials
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Credential">The credential to remove</param>
        public void RemoveBadCredential(PSCredential Credential)
        {
            if (Credential == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            foreach (PSCredential cred in KnownBadCredentials)
            {
                if (cred.UserName.ToLower() == Credential.UserName.ToLower())
                {
                    if (cred.GetNetworkCredential().Password == Credential.GetNetworkCredential().Password)
                    {
                        KnownBadCredentials.Remove(cred);
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        #endregion Credential Management

        #region Connection Types

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns the next connection type to try.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="ExcludedTypes">Exclude any type already tried and failed</param>
        /// <param name="Force">Overrides the timeout on bad connections</param>
        /// <returns>The next type to try.</returns>
        public ManagementConnectionType GetConnectionType(ManagementConnectionType ExcludedTypes, bool Force)
        {
            ManagementConnectionType temp = ExcludedTypes | DisabledConnectionTypes;

            #region Use working connections first

            if (((ManagementConnectionType.CimRM & temp) == 0) &&
                ((CimRM & ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Success) != 0))
                return ManagementConnectionType.CimRM;

            if (((ManagementConnectionType.CimDCOM & temp) == 0) &&
                ((CimDCOM & ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Success) != 0))
                return ManagementConnectionType.CimDCOM;

            if (((ManagementConnectionType.Wmi & temp) == 0) && ((Wmi & ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Success) != 0))
                return ManagementConnectionType.Wmi;

            if (((ManagementConnectionType.PowerShellRemoting & temp) == 0) &&
                ((PowerShellRemoting & ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Success) != 0))
                return ManagementConnectionType.PowerShellRemoting;

            #endregion Use working connections first

            #region Then prefer unknown connections

            if (((ManagementConnectionType.CimRM & temp) == 0) &&
                ((CimRM & ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Unknown) != 0))
                return ManagementConnectionType.CimRM;

            if (((ManagementConnectionType.CimDCOM & temp) == 0) &&
                ((CimDCOM & ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Unknown) != 0))
                return ManagementConnectionType.CimDCOM;

            if (((ManagementConnectionType.Wmi & temp) == 0) && ((Wmi & ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Unknown) != 0))
                return ManagementConnectionType.Wmi;

            if (((ManagementConnectionType.PowerShellRemoting & temp) == 0) &&
                ((PowerShellRemoting & ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Unknown) != 0))
                return ManagementConnectionType.PowerShellRemoting;

            #endregion Then prefer unknown connections

            #region Finally try what would not work previously

            if (((ManagementConnectionType.CimRM & temp) == 0) &&
                ((CimRM & ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Error) != 0) &&
                ((LastCimRM + ConnectionHost.BadConnectionTimeout < DateTime.Now) | Force))
                return ManagementConnectionType.CimRM;

            if (((ManagementConnectionType.CimDCOM & temp) == 0) &&
                ((CimDCOM & ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Error) != 0) &&
                ((LastCimDCOM + ConnectionHost.BadConnectionTimeout < DateTime.Now) | Force))
                return ManagementConnectionType.CimDCOM;

            if (((ManagementConnectionType.Wmi & temp) == 0) && ((Wmi & ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Error) != 0) &&
                ((LastWmi + ConnectionHost.BadConnectionTimeout < DateTime.Now) | Force))
                return ManagementConnectionType.Wmi;

            if (((ManagementConnectionType.PowerShellRemoting & temp) == 0) &&
                ((PowerShellRemoting & ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Error) != 0) &&
                ((LastPowerShellRemoting + ConnectionHost.BadConnectionTimeout < DateTime.Now) | Force))
                return ManagementConnectionType.PowerShellRemoting;

            #endregion Finally try what would not work previously

            // Do not try to use disabled protocols

            throw new PSInvalidOperationException("No connectiontypes left to try.");
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns a list of all available connection types whose inherent timeout has expired.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Timestamp">All last connection failures older than this point in time are considered to be expired</param>
        /// <returns>A list of all valid connection types</returns>
        public List<ManagementConnectionType> GetConnectionTypesTimed(DateTime Timestamp)
        {
            List<ManagementConnectionType> types = new List<ManagementConnectionType>();

            if (((DisabledConnectionTypes & ManagementConnectionType.CimRM) == 0) &&
                ((CimRM == ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Success) || (LastCimRM < Timestamp)))
                types.Add(ManagementConnectionType.CimRM);

            if (((DisabledConnectionTypes & ManagementConnectionType.CimDCOM) == 0) &&
                ((CimDCOM == ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Success) || (LastCimDCOM < Timestamp)))
                types.Add(ManagementConnectionType.CimDCOM);

            if (((DisabledConnectionTypes & ManagementConnectionType.Wmi) == 0) &&
                ((Wmi == ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Success) || (LastWmi < Timestamp)))
                types.Add(ManagementConnectionType.Wmi);

            if (((DisabledConnectionTypes & ManagementConnectionType.PowerShellRemoting) == 0) &&
                ((PowerShellRemoting == ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Success) ||
                 (LastPowerShellRemoting < Timestamp)))
                types.Add(ManagementConnectionType.PowerShellRemoting);

            return types;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns a list of all available connection types whose inherent timeout has expired.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Timespan">All last connection failures older than this far back into the past are considered to be expired</param>
        /// <returns>A list of all valid connection types</returns>
        public List<ManagementConnectionType> GetConnectionTypesTimed(TimeSpan Timespan)
        {
            return GetConnectionTypesTimed(DateTime.Now - Timespan);
        }

        #endregion Connection Types

        #region Internals

        internal void CopyTo(ManagementConnection Connection)
        {
            Connection.ComputerName = ComputerName;

            Connection.CimRM = CimRM;
            Connection.LastCimRM = LastCimRM;
            Connection.CimDCOM = CimDCOM;
            Connection.LastCimDCOM = LastCimDCOM;
            Connection.Wmi = Wmi;
            Connection.LastWmi = LastWmi;
            Connection.PowerShellRemoting = PowerShellRemoting;
            Connection.LastPowerShellRemoting = LastPowerShellRemoting;

            Connection.Credentials = Credentials;
            Connection.OverrideExplicitCredential = OverrideExplicitCredential;
            Connection.KnownBadCredentials = KnownBadCredentials;
            Connection.WindowsCredentialsAreBad = WindowsCredentialsAreBad;
        }

        #endregion Internals

        #region Constructors

        /// <summary>
        /// Creates a new, empty connection object. Necessary for serialization.
        /// </summary>
        public ManagementConnection()
        {

        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Creates a new default connection object, containing only its computer's name and default results.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="ComputerName">The computer targeted. Will be forced to lowercase.</param>
        public ManagementConnection(string ComputerName)
        {
            this.ComputerName = ComputerName.ToLower();
            if (Utility.Validation.IsLocalhost(ComputerName))
                CimRM = ManagementConnectionProtocolState.Disabled;
        }

        #endregion Constructors

        #region CIM Execution

        #region WinRM

        /// <summary>
        /// The options ot use when establishing a CIM Session
        /// </summary>
        public WSManSessionOptions CimWinRMOptions
        {
            get
            {
                if (_CimWinRMOptions == null)
                {
                    return null;
                }
                return new WSManSessionOptions(_CimWinRMOptions);
            }
            set
            {
                cimWinRMSession = null;
                _CimWinRMOptions = value;
            }
        }

        private WSManSessionOptions _CimWinRMOptions;

        private CimSession cimWinRMSession;
        private PSCredential cimWinRMSessionLastCredential;

        private CimSession GetCimWinRMSession(PSCredential Credential)
        {
            // Prepare the last session if any
            CimSession tempSession = cimWinRMSession;

            // If we use different credentials than last time, now's the time to interrupt
            if (!(cimWinRMSessionLastCredential == null && Credential == null))
            {
                if (cimWinRMSessionLastCredential == null || Credential == null)
                    tempSession = null;
                else if (cimWinRMSessionLastCredential.UserName != Credential.UserName)
                    tempSession = null;
                else if (cimWinRMSessionLastCredential.GetNetworkCredential().Password !=
                         Credential.GetNetworkCredential().Password)
                    tempSession = null;
            }

            if (tempSession == null)
            {
                WSManSessionOptions options;
                if (CimWinRMOptions == null)
                {
                    options = GetDefaultCimWsmanOptions();
                }
                else
                {
                    options = CimWinRMOptions;
                }
                if (Credential != null)
                {
                    options.AddDestinationCredentials(new CimCredential(PasswordAuthenticationMechanism.Default,
                        Credential.GetNetworkCredential().Domain, Credential.GetNetworkCredential().UserName,
                        Credential.Password));
                }

                try
                {
                    tempSession = CimSession.Create(ComputerName, options);
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    bool testBadCredential = false;
                    try
                    {
                        string tempMessageId = ((CimException) (e.InnerException)).MessageId;
                        if (tempMessageId == "HRESULT 0x8007052e")
                            testBadCredential = true;
                        else if (tempMessageId == "HRESULT 0x80070005")
                            testBadCredential = true;
                    }
                    catch
                    {
                    }

                    if (testBadCredential)
                    {
                        throw new UnauthorizedAccessException("Invalid credentials!", e);
                    }
                    throw;
                }

                cimWinRMSessionLastCredential = Credential;
            }

            return tempSession;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns the default wsman options object
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>Something very default-y</returns>
        private WSManSessionOptions GetDefaultCimWsmanOptions()
        {
            WSManSessionOptions options = new WSManSessionOptions();
            options.DestinationPort = 0;
            options.MaxEnvelopeSize = 0;
            options.CertCACheck = true;
            options.CertCNCheck = true;
            options.CertRevocationCheck = true;
            options.UseSsl = false;
            options.PacketEncoding = PacketEncoding.Utf8;
            options.NoEncryption = false;
            options.EncodePortInServicePrincipalName = false;

            return options;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Get all cim instances of the appropriate class using WinRM
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Credential">The credentiuls to use for the connection.</param>
        /// <param name="Class">The class to query.</param>
        /// <param name="Namespace">The namespace to look in (defaults to root\cimv2).</param>
        /// <returns>Hopefully a mountainload of CimInstances</returns>
        public object GetCimRMInstance(PSCredential Credential, string Class, string Namespace = @"root\cimv2")
        {
            CimSession tempSession;
            IEnumerable<CimInstance> result;

            tempSession = GetCimWinRMSession(Credential);
            result = tempSession.EnumerateInstances(Namespace, Class);
            
            if (DisableCimPersistence)
            {
                try
                {
                    tempSession.Close();
                }
                catch
                {
                }
                cimWinRMSession = null;
            }
            else
            {
                cimWinRMSession = tempSession;
            }
            return result;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Get all cim instances matching the query using WinRM
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Credential">The credentiuls to use for the connection.</param>
        /// <param name="Query">The query to use requesting information.</param>
        /// <param name="Dialect">Defaults to WQL.</param>
        /// <param name="Namespace">The namespace to look in (defaults to root\cimv2).</param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public object QueryCimRMInstance(PSCredential Credential, string Query, string Dialect = "WQL",
            string Namespace = @"root\cimv2")
        {
            CimSession tempSession;
            IEnumerable<CimInstance> result = new List<CimInstance>();

            try
            {
                tempSession = GetCimWinRMSession(Credential);
                result = tempSession.QueryInstances(Namespace, Dialect, Query);
                result.GetEnumerator().MoveNext();
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                bool testBadCredential = false;
                try
                {
                    string tempMessageId = ((CimException) e).MessageId;
                    if (tempMessageId == "HRESULT 0x8007052e")
                        testBadCredential = true;
                    else if (tempMessageId == "HRESULT 0x80070005")
                        testBadCredential = true;
                }
                catch
                {
                }

                if (testBadCredential)
                {
                    throw new UnauthorizedAccessException("Invalid credentials!", e);
                }
                throw;
            }

            if (DisableCimPersistence)
            {
                try
                {
                    tempSession.Close();
                }
                catch
                {
                }
                cimWinRMSession = null;
            }
            else
            {
                if (cimWinRMSession != tempSession)
                    cimWinRMSession = tempSession;
            }
            return result;
        }

        #endregion WinRM

        #region DCOM

        /// <summary>
        /// The options ot use when establishing a CIM Session
        /// </summary>
        public DComSessionOptions CimDComOptions
        {
            get
            {
                if (_CimDComOptions == null)
                {
                    return null;
                }
                DComSessionOptions options = new DComSessionOptions();
                options.PacketPrivacy = _CimDComOptions.PacketPrivacy;
                options.PacketIntegrity = _CimDComOptions.PacketIntegrity;
                options.Impersonation = _CimDComOptions.Impersonation;
                return options;
            }
            set
            {
                _CimDComOptions = null;
                _CimDComOptions = value;
            }
        }

        private DComSessionOptions _CimDComOptions;

        private CimSession cimDComSession;
        private PSCredential cimDComSessionLastCredential;

        private CimSession GetCimDComSession(PSCredential Credential)
        {
            // Prepare the last session if any
            CimSession tempSession = cimDComSession;

            // If we use different credentials than last time, now's the time to interrupt
            if (!(cimDComSessionLastCredential == null && Credential == null))
            {
                if (cimDComSessionLastCredential == null || Credential == null)
                    tempSession = null;
                else if (cimDComSessionLastCredential.UserName != Credential.UserName)
                    tempSession = null;
                else if (cimDComSessionLastCredential.GetNetworkCredential().Password !=
                         Credential.GetNetworkCredential().Password)
                    tempSession = null;
            }

            if (tempSession == null)
            {
                DComSessionOptions options = null;
                if (CimWinRMOptions == null)
                {
                    options = GetDefaultCimDcomOptions();
                }
                else
                {
                    options = CimDComOptions;
                }
                if (Credential != null)
                {
                    options.AddDestinationCredentials(new CimCredential(PasswordAuthenticationMechanism.Default,
                        Credential.GetNetworkCredential().Domain, Credential.GetNetworkCredential().UserName,
                        Credential.Password));
                }

                try
                {
                    tempSession = CimSession.Create(ComputerName, options);
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    bool testBadCredential = false;
                    try
                    {
                        string tempMessageId = ((CimException) (e.InnerException)).MessageId;
                        if (tempMessageId == "HRESULT 0x8007052e")
                            testBadCredential = true;
                        else if (tempMessageId == "HRESULT 0x80070005")
                            testBadCredential = true;
                    }
                    catch
                    {
                    }

                    if (testBadCredential)
                    {
                        throw new UnauthorizedAccessException("Invalid credentials!", e);
                    }
                    throw;
                }

                cimDComSessionLastCredential = Credential;
            }

            return tempSession;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns the default DCom options object
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>Something very default-y</returns>
        private DComSessionOptions GetDefaultCimDcomOptions()
        {
            DComSessionOptions options = new DComSessionOptions();
            options.PacketPrivacy = true;
            options.PacketIntegrity = true;
            options.Impersonation = ImpersonationType.Impersonate;

            return options;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Get all cim instances of the appropriate class using DCOM
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Credential">The credentiuls to use for the connection.</param>
        /// <param name="Class">The class to query</param>
        /// <param name="Namespace">The namespace to look in (defaults to root\cimv2)</param>
        /// <returns>Hopefully a mountainload of CimInstances</returns>
        public object GetCimDComInstance(PSCredential Credential, string Class, string Namespace = @"root\cimv2")
        {
            CimSession tempSession;
            IEnumerable<CimInstance> result = new List<CimInstance>();

            tempSession = GetCimDComSession(Credential);
            result = tempSession.EnumerateInstances(Namespace, Class);

            if (DisableCimPersistence)
            {
                try
                {
                    tempSession.Close();
                }
                catch
                {
                }
                cimDComSession = null;
            }
            else
            {
                if (cimDComSession != tempSession)
                    cimDComSession = tempSession;
            }
            return result;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Get all cim instances matching the query using DCOM
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Credential">The credentiuls to use for the connection.</param>
        /// <param name="Query">The query to use requesting information.</param>
        /// <param name="Dialect">Defaults to WQL.</param>
        /// <param name="Namespace">The namespace to look in (defaults to root\cimv2).</param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public object QueryCimDCOMInstance(PSCredential Credential, string Query, string Dialect = "WQL",
            string Namespace = @"root\cimv2")
        {
            CimSession tempSession;
            IEnumerable<CimInstance> result = new List<CimInstance>();

            tempSession = GetCimDComSession(Credential);
            result = tempSession.QueryInstances(Namespace, Dialect, Query);
            result.GetEnumerator().MoveNext();

            if (DisableCimPersistence)
            {
                try
                {
                    tempSession.Close();
                }
                catch
                {
                }
                cimDComSession = null;
            }
            else
            {
                if (cimDComSession != tempSession)
                    cimDComSession = tempSession;
            }
            return result;
        }

        #endregion DCOM

        #endregion CIM Execution

        /// <summary>
        /// Simple string representation
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>Returns the computerName it is connection for</returns>
        public override string ToString()
        {
            return ComputerName;
        }
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\Connection\ManagementConnectionProtocolState.cs
namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Connection
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The various types of state a connection-protocol may have
    /// </summary>
    public enum ManagementConnectionProtocolState
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The default initial state, before any tests are performed
        /// </summary>
        Unknown = 1,

        /// <summary>
        /// A successful connection was last established
        /// </summary>
        Success = 2,

        /// <summary>
        /// Connecting using the relevant protocol failed last it was tried
        /// </summary>
        Error = 4,

        /// <summary>
        /// The relevant protocol has been disabled and should not be used
        /// </summary>
        Disabled = 8
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\diagnosticquery\SQLServerDiagnosticQueries_2016SP2_201807.sql

-- SQL Server 2016 SP2 Diagnostic Information Queries
-- Glenn Berry 
-- Last Modified: August 21, 2018
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/
-- http://sqlserverperformance.wordpress.com/
-- Twitter: GlennAlanBerry

-- Please listen to my Pluralsight courses
-- https://www.pluralsight.com/author/glenn-berry

-- If you want to find all of our SQLskills SQL101 blog posts, check out https://bit.ly/2qLwfXW


-- Please make sure you are using the correct version of these diagnostic queries for your version of SQL Server


-- If you like PowerShell, there is a very useful community solution for running these queries in an automated fashion
-- https://dbatools.io/

-- Invoke-DbaDiagnosticQuery
-- https://dbatools.io/functions/invoke-dbadiagnosticquery/


--******************************************************************************
--*   Copyright (C) 2018 Glenn Berry, SQLskills.com
--*   All rights reserved. 
--*
--*   For more scripts and sample code, check out 
--*      https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn
--*
--*   You may alter this code for your own *non-commercial* purposes. You may
--*   republish altered code as long as you include this copyright and give due credit. 
--*
--*
--*   THIS CODE AND INFORMATION ARE PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF 
--*   ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED 
--*   TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND/OR FITNESS FOR A
--*   PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
--*
--******************************************************************************

-- Check the major product version to see if it is SQL Server 2017 CTP 1 or greater
IF EXISTS (SELECT * WHERE CONVERT(varchar(128), SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion')) LIKE '13%')
	BEGIN
		IF CONVERT(int, SERVERPROPERTY('ProductBuild')) >= 5026
			PRINT N'You have the correct Service Pack of SQL Server 2016 for this diagnostic information script';
		IF CONVERT(int, SERVERPROPERTY('ProductBuild')) < 5026
			PRINT N'You do NOT have the correct Service Pack of SQL Server 2016 for this diagnostic information script';		
	END
ELSE
	BEGIN
		DECLARE @ProductVersion varchar(128) = CONVERT(varchar(128), SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion'));
		RAISERROR ('Script does not match the ProductVersion [%s] of this instance. Many of these queries may not work on this version.' , 18 , 16 , @ProductVersion);
	END
	
	

-- Instance level queries *******************************

-- SQL and OS Version information for current instance  (Query 1) (Version Info)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], @@VERSION AS [SQL Server and OS Version Info];
------

-- SQL Server 2016 Builds																		
-- Build			Description			Release Date	URL to KB Article								
-- 13.0.5026.0		SP2 RTM				4/24/2018		https://bit.ly/2FEvN2q 
-- 13.0.5149.0		SP2 CU1				5/30/2018		https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4135048/cumulative-update-1-for-sql-server-2016-sp2
-- 13.0.5153.0		SP2 CU2				7/16/2018		https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4340355	

		
															

-- How to determine the version, edition and update level of SQL Server and its components 
-- https://bit.ly/2oAjKgW														

-- How to obtain the latest Service Pack for SQL Server 2016
-- https://bit.ly/2egtfzK

-- SQL Server 2016 build versions 
-- https://bit.ly/2epkTDT

-- Where to find information about the latest SQL Server builds
-- https://bit.ly/2IGHbfY

-- Performance and Stability Related Fixes in Post-SQL Server 2016 SP2 Builds
-- https://bit.ly/2K3LoPf		

-- Announcing updates to the SQL Server Incremental Servicing Model (ISM)
-- https://bit.ly/1RzYITz

-- Update Center for Microsoft SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2pZptuQ

-- Download SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS)
-- https://bit.ly/1OcupT9

-- Download and install Microsoft SQL Operations Studio 
-- https://bit.ly/2vgke1A



-- Get socket, physical core and logical core count from the SQL Server Error log. (Query 2) (Core Counts)
-- This query might take a few seconds depending on the size of your error log
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'detected', N'socket';
------

-- This can help you determine the exact core counts used by SQL Server and whether HT is enabled or not
-- It can also help you confirm your SQL Server licensing model
-- Be on the lookout for this message "using 40 logical processors based on SQL Server licensing" 
-- (when you have more than 40 logical cores) which means grandfathered Server/CAL licensing
-- This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was last started



-- Get selected server properties (Query 3) (Server Properties)
SELECT SERVERPROPERTY('MachineName') AS [MachineName], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ServerName') AS [ServerName],  
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceName') AS [Instance], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsClustered') AS [IsClustered], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS') AS [ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS], 
SERVERPROPERTY('Edition') AS [Edition], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductLevel') AS [ProductLevel],				-- What servicing branch (RTM/SP/CU)
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductUpdateLevel') AS [ProductUpdateLevel],	-- Within a servicing branch, what CU# is applied
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion') AS [ProductVersion],
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductMajorVersion') AS [ProductMajorVersion], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductMinorVersion') AS [ProductMinorVersion], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductBuild') AS [ProductBuild], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductBuildType') AS [ProductBuildType],			  -- Is this a GDR or OD hotfix (NULL if on a CU build)
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductUpdateReference') AS [ProductUpdateReference], -- KB article number that is applicable for this build
SERVERPROPERTY('ProcessID') AS [ProcessID],
SERVERPROPERTY('Collation') AS [Collation], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsFullTextInstalled') AS [IsFullTextInstalled], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsIntegratedSecurityOnly') AS [IsIntegratedSecurityOnly],
SERVERPROPERTY('FilestreamConfiguredLevel') AS [FilestreamConfiguredLevel],
SERVERPROPERTY('IsHadrEnabled') AS [IsHadrEnabled], 
SERVERPROPERTY('HadrManagerStatus') AS [HadrManagerStatus],
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceDefaultDataPath') AS [InstanceDefaultDataPath],
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceDefaultLogPath') AS [InstanceDefaultLogPath],
SERVERPROPERTY('BuildClrVersion') AS [Build CLR Version],
SERVERPROPERTY('IsXTPSupported') AS [IsXTPSupported],
SERVERPROPERTY('IsPolybaseInstalled') AS [IsPolybaseInstalled],				-- New for SQL Server 2016
SERVERPROPERTY('IsAdvancedAnalyticsInstalled') AS [IsRServicesInstalled];	-- New for SQL Server 2016
------

-- This gives you a lot of useful information about your instance of SQL Server,
-- such as the ProcessID for SQL Server and your collation
-- Note: Some columns will be NULL on older SQL Server builds

-- SERVERPROPERTY (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2eeaXeI



-- Get instance-level configuration values for instance  (Query 4) (Configuration Values)
SELECT name, value, value_in_use, minimum, maximum, [description], is_dynamic, is_advanced
FROM sys.configurations WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Focus on these settings:
-- automatic soft-NUMA disabled (should be 0 in most cases)
-- backup checksum default (should be 1)
-- backup compression default (should be 1 in most cases)
-- clr enabled (only enable if it is needed)
-- cost threshold for parallelism (depends on your workload)
-- lightweight pooling (should be zero)
-- max degree of parallelism (depends on your workload and hardware)
-- max server memory (MB) (set to an appropriate value, not the default)
-- optimize for ad hoc workloads (should be 1)
-- priority boost (should be zero)
-- remote admin connections (should be 1)


-- sys.configurations (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2HsyDZI


-- Returns a list of all global trace flags that are enabled (Query 5) (Global Trace Flags)
DBCC TRACESTATUS (-1);
------

-- If no global trace flags are enabled, no results will be returned.
-- It is very useful to know what global trace flags are currently enabled as part of the diagnostic process.

-- Common trace flags that should be enabled in most cases
-- TF 3226 - Supresses logging of successful database backup messages to the SQL Server Error Log
--           https://bit.ly/2p6MTjS  

-- TF 6534 - Enables use of native code to improve performance with spatial data
--           https://bit.ly/2HrQUpU         

-- The behavior of TF 1117, 1118 are enabled for tempdb in SQL Server 2016 by default
-- SQL 2016 � It Just Runs Faster: -T1117 and -T1118 changes for TEMPDB and user databases
-- https://bit.ly/2lbNWxK           

-- The behavior of TF 2371 is enabled by default in SQL Server 2016 and newer (in compat level 130 and higher)

-- DBCC TRACEON - Trace Flags (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2FuSvPg





-- Returns status of instant file initialization (Query 6) (IFI Status)
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'Database Instant File Initialization';
------

-- Lets you determine whether Instant File Initialization (IFI) is enabled for the instance
-- This should be enabled in the vast majority of cases
-- SQL Server 2016 and newer lets you enable this during the SQL server installation process

-- Database Instant File Initialization
-- https://bit.ly/2nTX74y

-- Misconceptions around instant file initialization
-- https://bit.ly/2oBSKgZ



-- SQL Server Process Address space info  (Query 7) (Process Memory)
-- (shows whether locked pages is enabled, among other things)
SELECT physical_memory_in_use_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Memory Usage (MB)],
	   locked_page_allocations_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Locked Pages Allocation (MB)],
       large_page_allocations_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Large Pages Allocation (MB)], 
	   page_fault_count, memory_utilization_percentage, available_commit_limit_kb, 
	   process_physical_memory_low, process_virtual_memory_low
FROM sys.dm_os_process_memory WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You want to see 0 for process_physical_memory_low
-- You want to see 0 for process_virtual_memory_low
-- This indicates that you are not under internal memory pressure
-- If locked_page_allocations_kb > 0, then LPIM is enabled

-- How to enable the "locked pages" feature in SQL Server 2012
-- https://bit.ly/2F5UjOA

-- Memory Management Architecture Guide
-- https://bit.ly/2JKkadC 



-- SQL Server Services information (Query 8) (SQL Server Services Info)
SELECT servicename, process_id, startup_type_desc, status_desc, 
last_startup_time, service_account, is_clustered, cluster_nodename, [filename], 
instant_file_initialization_enabled 
FROM sys.dm_server_services WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you the account being used for the SQL Server Service and the SQL Agent Service
-- Shows the process_id, when they were last started, and their current status
-- Also shows whether you are running on a failover cluster instance, and what node you are running on
-- Also shows whether IFI is enabled

-- sys.dm_server_services (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2oKa1Un


-- Last backup information by database  (Query 9) (Last Backup By Database)
SELECT ISNULL(d.[name], bs.[database_name]) AS [Database], d.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model], 
       d.log_reuse_wait_desc AS [Log Reuse Wait Desc],
    MAX(CASE WHEN [type] = 'D' THEN bs.backup_finish_date ELSE NULL END) AS [Last Full Backup],
    MAX(CASE WHEN [type] = 'I' THEN bs.backup_finish_date ELSE NULL END) AS [Last Differential Backup],
    MAX(CASE WHEN [type] = 'L' THEN bs.backup_finish_date ELSE NULL END) AS [Last Log Backup]
FROM sys.databases AS d WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.backupset AS bs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON bs.[database_name] = d.[name] 
AND bs.backup_finish_date > GETDATE()- 30
WHERE d.name <> N'tempdb'
GROUP BY ISNULL(d.[name], bs.[database_name]), d.recovery_model_desc, d.log_reuse_wait_desc, d.[name] 
ORDER BY d.recovery_model_desc, d.[name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you spot runaway transaction logs and other issues with your backup schedule


-- Get SQL Server Agent jobs and Category information (Query 10) (SQL Server Agent Jobs)
SELECT sj.name AS [Job Name], sj.[description] AS [Job Description], SUSER_SNAME(sj.owner_sid) AS [Job Owner],
sj.date_created AS [Date Created], sj.[enabled] AS [Job Enabled], 
sj.notify_email_operator_id, sj.notify_level_email, sc.name AS [CategoryName],
s.[enabled] AS [Sched Enabled], js.next_run_date, js.next_run_time
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobs AS sj WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.syscategories AS sc WITH (NOLOCK)
ON sj.category_id = sc.category_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobschedules AS js WITH (NOLOCK)
ON sj.job_id = js.job_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysschedules AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON js.schedule_id = s.schedule_id
ORDER BY sj.name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some basic information about your SQL Server Agent jobs, who owns them and how they are configured
-- Look for Agent jobs that are not owned by sa
-- Look for jobs that have a notify_email_operator_id set to 0 (meaning no operator)
-- Look for jobs that have a notify_level_email set to 0 (meaning no e-mail is ever sent)
--
-- MSDN sysjobs documentation
-- https://bit.ly/2paDEOP 

-- SQL Server Maintenance Solution
-- https://bit.ly/1pgchQu  


-- Get SQL Server Agent Alert Information (Query 11) (SQL Server Agent Alerts)
SELECT name, event_source, message_id, severity, [enabled], has_notification, 
       delay_between_responses, occurrence_count, last_occurrence_date, last_occurrence_time
FROM msdb.dbo.sysalerts WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some basic information about your SQL Server Agent Alerts 
-- (which are different from SQL Server Agent jobs)
-- Read more about Agent Alerts here: https://bit.ly/2Giz0Xf 



-- Windows information (Query 12) (Windows Info)
SELECT windows_release, windows_service_pack_level, 
       windows_sku, os_language_version
FROM sys.dm_os_windows_info WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you major OS version, Service Pack, Edition, and language info for the operating system
-- 10.0 is either Windows 10 or Windows Server 2016
-- 6.3 is either Windows 8.1 or Windows Server 2012 R2 
-- 6.2 is either Windows 8 or Windows Server 2012


-- Windows SKU codes
-- 4 is Enterprise Edition
-- 7 is Standard Server Edition
-- 8 is Datacenter Server Edition
-- 10 is Enterprise Server Edition
-- 48 is Professional Edition
-- 161 is Pro for Workstations

-- 1033 for os_language_version is US-English

-- SQL Server 2016 requires Windows Server 2012 or newer

-- Quick-Start Installation of SQL Server 2016
-- https://bit.ly/2qtxQ3G

-- Hardware and Software Requirements for Installing SQL Server 2016
-- https://bit.ly/2JJIUTl

-- Using SQL Server in Windows 8 and later versions of Windows operating system 
-- https://bit.ly/2F7Ax0P


-- SQL Server NUMA Node information  (Query 13) (SQL Server NUMA Info)
SELECT node_id, node_state_desc, memory_node_id, processor_group, cpu_count, online_scheduler_count, 
       idle_scheduler_count, active_worker_count, avg_load_balance, resource_monitor_state
FROM sys.dm_os_nodes WITH (NOLOCK) 
WHERE node_state_desc <> N'ONLINE DAC' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some useful information about the composition and relative load on your NUMA nodes
-- You want to see an equal number of schedulers on each NUMA node
-- Watch out if SQL Server 2017 Standard Edition has been installed 
-- on a physical or virtual machine with more than four sockets or more than 24 physical cores

-- sys.dm_os_nodes (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pn5Mw8

-- Balancing Your Available SQL Server Core Licenses Evenly Across NUMA Nodes
-- https://bit.ly/2vfC4Rq



-- Good basic information about OS memory amounts and state  (Query 14) (System Memory)
SELECT total_physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Physical Memory (MB)], 
       available_physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Available Memory (MB)], 
       total_page_file_kb/1024 AS [Total Page File (MB)], 
	   available_page_file_kb/1024 AS [Available Page File (MB)], 
	   system_cache_kb/1024 AS [System Cache (MB)],
       system_memory_state_desc AS [System Memory State]
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_memory WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You want to see "Available physical memory is high" for System Memory State
-- This indicates that you are not under external memory pressure

-- Possible System Memory State values:
-- Available physical memory is high
-- Physical memory usage is steady
-- Available physical memory is low
-- Available physical memory is running low
-- Physical memory state is transitioning

-- sys.dm_os_sys_memory (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pcV0xq



-- You can skip the next two queries if you know you don't have a clustered instance


-- Get information about your cluster nodes and their status  (Query 15) (Cluster Node Properties)
-- (if your database server is in a failover cluster)
SELECT NodeName, status_description, is_current_owner
FROM sys.dm_os_cluster_nodes WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Knowing which node owns the cluster resources is critical
-- Especially when you are installing Windows or SQL Server updates
-- You will see no results if your instance is not clustered

-- Recommended hotfixes and updates for Windows Server 2012 R2-based failover clusters
-- https://bit.ly/1z5BfCw


-- Get information about any AlwaysOn AG cluster this instance is a part of (Query 16) (AlwaysOn AG Cluster)
SELECT cluster_name, quorum_type_desc, quorum_state_desc
FROM sys.dm_hadr_cluster WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You will see no results if your instance is not using AlwaysOn AGs


-- Good overview of AG health and status (Query 17) (AlwaysOn AG Status)
SELECT ag.name AS [AG Name], ar.replica_server_name, ar.availability_mode_desc, adc.[database_name], 
       drs.is_local, drs.is_primary_replica, drs.synchronization_state_desc, drs.is_commit_participant, 
	   drs.synchronization_health_desc, drs.recovery_lsn, drs.truncation_lsn, drs.last_sent_lsn, 
	   drs.last_sent_time, drs.last_received_lsn, drs.last_received_time, drs.last_hardened_lsn, 
	   drs.last_hardened_time, drs.last_redone_lsn, drs.last_redone_time, drs.log_send_queue_size, 
	   drs.log_send_rate, drs.redo_queue_size, drs.redo_rate, drs.filestream_send_rate, 
	   drs.end_of_log_lsn, drs.last_commit_lsn, drs.last_commit_time, drs.database_state_desc 
FROM sys.dm_hadr_database_replica_states AS drs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.availability_databases_cluster AS adc WITH (NOLOCK)
ON drs.group_id = adc.group_id 
AND drs.group_database_id = adc.group_database_id
INNER JOIN sys.availability_groups AS ag WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ag.group_id = drs.group_id
INNER JOIN sys.availability_replicas AS ar WITH (NOLOCK)
ON drs.group_id = ar.group_id 
AND drs.replica_id = ar.replica_id
ORDER BY ag.name, ar.replica_server_name, adc.[database_name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);

-- You will see no results if your instance is not using AlwaysOn AGs

-- SQL Server 2016 � It Just Runs Faster: Always On Availability Groups Turbocharged
-- https://bit.ly/2dn1H6r


-- Hardware information from SQL Server 2016 SP2  (Query 18) (Hardware Info)
SELECT cpu_count AS [Logical CPU Count], scheduler_count, 
       (socket_count * cores_per_socket) AS [Physical Core Count], 
       socket_count AS [Socket Count], cores_per_socket, numa_node_count,
       physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Physical Memory (MB)], 
       max_workers_count AS [Max Workers Count], 
	   affinity_type_desc AS [Affinity Type], 
       sqlserver_start_time AS [SQL Server Start Time], 
	   virtual_machine_type_desc AS [Virtual Machine Type], 
       softnuma_configuration_desc AS [Soft NUMA Configuration], 
	   sql_memory_model_desc
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some good basic hardware information about your database server
-- Note: virtual_machine_type_desc of HYPERVISOR does not automatically mean you are running SQL Server inside of a VM
-- It merely indicates that you have a hypervisor running on your host

-- sys.dm_os_sys_info (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pczOYs

-- Soft NUMA configuration was a new column for SQL Server 2016
-- OFF = Soft-NUMA feature is OFF
-- ON = SQL Server automatically determines the NUMA node sizes for Soft-NUMA
-- MANUAL = Manually configured soft-NUMA

-- Configure SQL Server to Use Soft-NUMA (SQL Server)
-- https://bit.ly/2HTpKJt

-- sql_memory_model_desc values (Added in SQL Server 2016 SP1)
-- CONVENTIONAL
-- LOCK_PAGES
-- LARGE_PAGES
   

-- Get System Manufacturer and model number from SQL Server Error log (Query 19) (System Manufacturer)
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'Manufacturer';
------ 

-- This can help you determine the capabilities and capacities of your database server
-- Can also be used to confirm if you are running in a VM
-- This query might take a few seconds if you have not recycled your error log recently
-- This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was started


-- Get BIOS date from Windows Registry (Query 20) (BIOS Date)
EXEC sys.xp_instance_regread N'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE', N'HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\BIOS', N'BiosReleaseDate';
------

-- Helps you understand whether the main system BIOS is up to date, and the possible age of the hardware
-- Not as useful for virtualization


-- Get processor description from Windows Registry  (Query 21) (Processor Description)
EXEC sys.xp_instance_regread N'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE', N'HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\CentralProcessor\0', N'ProcessorNameString';
------

-- Gives you the model number and rated clock speed of your processor(s)
-- Your processors may be running at less than the rated clock speed due
-- to the Windows Power Plan or hardware power management

-- You can use CPU-Z to get your actual CPU core speed and a lot of other useful information
-- https://bit.ly/QhR6xF

-- You can learn more about processor selection for SQL Server by following this link
-- https://bit.ly/2F3aVlP



-- See if buffer pool extension (BPE) is enabled (Query 22) (BPE Configuration)
SELECT [path], state_description, current_size_in_kb, 
CAST(current_size_in_kb/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10,2)) AS [Size (GB)]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_pool_extension_configuration WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- BPE is available in both Standard Edition and Enterprise Edition
-- It is a more interesting feature for Standard Edition

-- Buffer Pool Extension to SSDs in SQL Server 2014
-- https://bit.ly/1bm08m8

-- Buffer Pool Extension
-- https://bit.ly/2oBuieO



-- Look at buffer descriptors to see BPE usage by database (Query 23) (BPE Usage) 
SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name], COUNT(page_id) AS [Page Count],
CAST(COUNT(*)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Buffer size(MB)], 
AVG(read_microsec) AS [Avg Read Time (microseconds)]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE database_id <> 32767
AND is_in_bpool_extension = 1
GROUP BY DB_NAME(database_id) 
ORDER BY [Buffer size(MB)] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You will see no results if BPE is not enabled or if there is no BPE usage


-- Get information on location, time and size of any memory dumps from SQL Server  (Query 24) (Memory Dump Info)
SELECT [filename], creation_time, size_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS [Size (MB)]
FROM sys.dm_server_memory_dumps WITH (NOLOCK) 
ORDER BY creation_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This will not return any rows if you have 
-- not had any memory dumps (which is a good thing)

-- sys.dm_server_memory_dumps (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2elwWll



-- Look at Suspect Pages table (Query 25) (Suspect Pages)
SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name], [file_id], page_id, 
       event_type, error_count, last_update_date 
FROM msdb.dbo.suspect_pages WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY database_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- event_type value descriptions
-- 1 = 823 error caused by an operating system CRC error
--     or 824 error other than a bad checksum or a torn page (for example, a bad page ID)
-- 2 = Bad checksum
-- 3 = Torn page
-- 4 = Restored (The page was restored after it was marked bad)
-- 5 = Repaired (DBCC repaired the page)
-- 7 = Deallocated by DBCC

-- Ideally, this query returns no results. The table is limited to 1000 rows.
-- If you do get results here, you should do further investigation to determine the root cause

-- Manage the suspect_pages Table
-- https://bit.ly/2Fvr1c9


-- Get number of data files in tempdb database (Query 26) (TempDB Data Files)
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'The tempdb database has';
------

-- Get the number of data files in the tempdb database
-- 4-8 data files that are all the same size is a good starting point
-- This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was last started


-- File names and paths for all user and system databases on instance  (Query 27) (Database Filenames and Paths)
SELECT DB_NAME([database_id]) AS [Database Name], 
       [file_id], [name], physical_name, [type_desc], state_desc,
	   is_percent_growth, growth,
	   CONVERT(bigint, growth/128.0) AS [Growth in MB], 
       CONVERT(bigint, size/128.0) AS [Total Size in MB]
FROM sys.master_files WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY DB_NAME([database_id]), [file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Things to look at:
-- Are data files and log files on different drives?
-- Is everything on the C: drive?
-- Is tempdb on dedicated drives?
-- Is there only one tempdb data file?
-- Are all of the tempdb data files the same size?
-- Are there multiple data files for user databases?
-- Is percent growth enabled for any files (which is bad)?



-- Volume info for all LUNS that have database files on the current instance (Query 28) (Volume Info)
SELECT DISTINCT vs.volume_mount_point, vs.file_system_type, vs.logical_volume_name, 
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.total_bytes/1073741824.0) AS [Total Size (GB)],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.available_bytes/1073741824.0) AS [Available Size (GB)],  
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.available_bytes * 1. / vs.total_bytes * 100.) AS [Space Free %],
vs.supports_compression, vs.is_compressed, 
vs.supports_sparse_files, vs.supports_alternate_streams
FROM sys.master_files AS f WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_os_volume_stats(f.database_id, f.[file_id]) AS vs 
ORDER BY vs.volume_mount_point OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Shows you the total and free space on the LUNs where you have database files
-- Being low on free space can negatively affect performance

-- sys.dm_os_volume_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2oBPNNr



-- Drive level latency information (Query 29) (Drive Level Latency)
-- Based on code from Jimmy May
SELECT tab.[Drive], tab.volume_mount_point AS [Volume Mount Point], 
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_reads = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall_read_ms/num_of_reads) 
	END AS [Read Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_writes = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall_write_ms/num_of_writes) 
	END AS [Write Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN (num_of_reads = 0 AND num_of_writes = 0) THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall/(num_of_reads + num_of_writes)) 
	END AS [Overall Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_reads = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (num_of_bytes_read/num_of_reads) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Read],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_writes = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (num_of_bytes_written/num_of_writes) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Write],
	CASE 
		WHEN (num_of_reads = 0 AND num_of_writes = 0) THEN 0 
		ELSE ((num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/(num_of_reads + num_of_writes)) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Transfer]
FROM (SELECT LEFT(UPPER(mf.physical_name), 2) AS Drive, SUM(num_of_reads) AS num_of_reads,
	         SUM(io_stall_read_ms) AS io_stall_read_ms, SUM(num_of_writes) AS num_of_writes,
	         SUM(io_stall_write_ms) AS io_stall_write_ms, SUM(num_of_bytes_read) AS num_of_bytes_read,
	         SUM(num_of_bytes_written) AS num_of_bytes_written, SUM(io_stall) AS io_stall, vs.volume_mount_point 
      FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS vfs
      INNER JOIN sys.master_files AS mf WITH (NOLOCK)
      ON vfs.database_id = mf.database_id AND vfs.file_id = mf.file_id
	  CROSS APPLY sys.dm_os_volume_stats(mf.database_id, mf.[file_id]) AS vs 
      GROUP BY LEFT(UPPER(mf.physical_name), 2), vs.volume_mount_point) AS tab
ORDER BY [Overall Latency] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Shows you the drive-level latency for reads and writes, in milliseconds
-- Latency above 30-40ms is usually a problem
-- These latency numbers include all file activity against all SQL Server 
-- database files on each drive since SQL Server was last started


-- Calculates average stalls per read, per write, and per total input/output for each database file  (Query 30) (IO Stalls by File)
SELECT DB_NAME(fs.database_id) AS [Database Name], CAST(fs.io_stall_read_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_read_stall_ms],
CAST(fs.io_stall_write_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_write_stall_ms],
CAST((fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms)/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_io_stall_ms],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), mf.size/128.0) AS [File Size (MB)], mf.physical_name, mf.type_desc, fs.io_stall_read_ms, fs.num_of_reads, 
fs.io_stall_write_ms, fs.num_of_writes, fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms AS [io_stalls], fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes AS [total_io],
io_stall_queued_read_ms AS [Resource Governor Total Read IO Latency (ms)], io_stall_queued_write_ms AS [Resource Governor Total Write IO Latency (ms)] 
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(null,null) AS fs
INNER JOIN sys.master_files AS mf WITH (NOLOCK)
ON fs.database_id = mf.database_id
AND fs.[file_id] = mf.[file_id]
ORDER BY avg_io_stall_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database files on the entire instance have the most I/O bottlenecks
-- This can help you decide whether certain LUNs are overloaded and whether you might
-- want to move some files to a different location or perhaps improve your I/O performance
-- These latency numbers include all file activity against each SQL Server 
-- database file since SQL Server was last started


-- Look for I/O requests taking longer than 15 seconds in the six most recent SQL Server Error Logs (Query 31) (IO Warnings)
CREATE TABLE #IOWarningResults(LogDate datetime, ProcessInfo sysname, LogText nvarchar(1000));

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 1, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 2, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 3, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 4, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 5, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

SELECT LogDate, ProcessInfo, LogText
FROM #IOWarningResults
ORDER BY LogDate DESC;

DROP TABLE #IOWarningResults;
------  

-- Finding 15 second I/O warnings in the SQL Server Error Log is useful evidence of
-- poor I/O performance (which might have many different causes)
-- Look to see if you see any patterns in the results (same files, same drives, same time of day, etc.)

-- Diagnostics in SQL Server help detect stalled and stuck I/O operations
-- https://bit.ly/2qtaw73



-- Recovery model, log reuse wait description, log file size, log usage size  (Query 32) (Database Properties)
-- and compatibility level for all databases on instance
SELECT db.[name] AS [Database Name], SUSER_SNAME(db.owner_sid) AS [Database Owner], db.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model], 
db.state_desc, db.containment_desc, db.log_reuse_wait_desc AS [Log Reuse Wait Description], 
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), ls.cntr_value/1024.0) AS [Log Size (MB)], CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), lu.cntr_value/1024.0) AS [Log Used (MB)],
CAST(CAST(lu.cntr_value AS FLOAT) / CAST(ls.cntr_value AS FLOAT)AS DECIMAL(18,2)) * 100 AS [Log Used %], 
db.[compatibility_level] AS [DB Compatibility Level], 
db.is_mixed_page_allocation_on, db.page_verify_option_desc AS [Page Verify Option], 
db.is_auto_create_stats_on, db.is_auto_update_stats_on, db.is_auto_update_stats_async_on, db.is_parameterization_forced, 
db.snapshot_isolation_state_desc, db.is_read_committed_snapshot_on, db.is_auto_close_on, db.is_auto_shrink_on, 
db.target_recovery_time_in_seconds, db.is_cdc_enabled, db.is_published, db.is_distributor,
db.group_database_id, db.replica_id,db.is_memory_optimized_elevate_to_snapshot_on, 
db.delayed_durability_desc, db.is_auto_create_stats_incremental_on,
db.is_query_store_on, db.is_sync_with_backup, 
db.is_supplemental_logging_enabled, db.is_remote_data_archive_enabled,
db.is_encrypted, de.encryption_state, de.percent_complete, de.key_algorithm, de.key_length      
FROM sys.databases AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS lu WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.name = lu.instance_name
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS ls WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.name = ls.instance_name
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_database_encryption_keys AS de WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.database_id = de.database_id
WHERE lu.counter_name LIKE N'Log File(s) Used Size (KB)%' 
AND ls.counter_name LIKE N'Log File(s) Size (KB)%'
AND ls.cntr_value > 0 
ORDER BY db.[name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Things to look at:
-- How many databases are on the instance?
-- What recovery models are they using?
-- What is the log reuse wait description?
-- How full are the transaction logs?
-- What compatibility level are the databases on? 
-- What is the Page Verify Option? (should be CHECKSUM)
-- Is Auto Update Statistics Asynchronously enabled?
-- Is Delayed Durability enabled
-- Make sure auto_shrink and auto_close are not enabled!

-- is_mixed_page_allocation_on is a new property for SQL Server 2016. Equivalent to TF 1118 for a user database
-- SQL Server 2016: Changes in default behavior for autogrow and allocations for tempdb and user databases
-- https://bit.ly/2evRZSR

-- A non-zero value for target_recovery_time_in_seconds means that indirect checkpoint is enabled 
-- If the setting has a zero value it indicates that automatic checkpoint is enabled

-- Changes in SQL Server 2016 Checkpoint Behavior
-- https://bit.ly/2pdggk3


-- Missing Indexes for all databases by Index Advantage  (Query 33) (Missing Indexes All Databases)
SELECT CONVERT(decimal(18,2), user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01)) AS [index_advantage],
FORMAT(migs.last_user_seek, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss') AS [last_user_seek], 
mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement]) AS [missing_indexes_for_table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement], equality_columns) AS [similar_missing_indexes_for_table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, 
CONVERT(decimal(18,2), migs.avg_total_user_cost) AS [avg_total_user_cost], migs.avg_user_impact 
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Getting missing index information for all of the databases on the instance is very useful
-- Look at last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
-- Also look at avg_user_impact and avg_total_user_cost to help determine importance
-- SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware
-- Do not just blindly add indexes that show up from this query!!!

-- SQL Server Index Design Guide
-- https://bit.ly/2qtZr4N



-- Get VLF Counts for all databases on the instance (Query 34) (VLF Counts)
SELECT�[name] AS [Database Name],�[VLF Count] 
FROM�sys.databases�AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY�(SELECT�file_id, COUNT(*)�AS [VLF Count]�
			 FROM sys.dm_db_log_info(db.database_id) 
����������   GROUP BY�file_id)�AS li
ORDER BY [VLF Count] DESC  OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- High VLF counts can affect write performance to the log file
-- and they can make full database restores and crash recovery take much longer
-- Try to keep your VLF counts under 200 in most cases (depending on log file size)

-- Important change to VLF creation algorithm in SQL Server 2014
-- https://bit.ly/2Hsjbg4

-- SQL Server Transaction Log Architecture and Management Guide
-- https://bit.ly/2JjmQRZ



-- Get CPU utilization by database (Query 35) (CPU Usage by Database)
WITH DB_CPU_Stats
AS
(SELECT pa.DatabaseID, DB_Name(pa.DatabaseID) AS [Database Name], SUM(qs.total_worker_time/1000) AS [CPU_Time_Ms]
 FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
 CROSS APPLY (SELECT CONVERT(int, value) AS [DatabaseID] 
              FROM sys.dm_exec_plan_attributes(qs.plan_handle)
              WHERE attribute = N'dbid') AS pa
 GROUP BY DatabaseID)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY [CPU_Time_Ms] DESC) AS [CPU Rank],
       [Database Name], [CPU_Time_Ms] AS [CPU Time (ms)], 
       CAST([CPU_Time_Ms] * 1.0 / SUM([CPU_Time_Ms]) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5, 2)) AS [CPU Percent]
FROM DB_CPU_Stats
WHERE DatabaseID <> 32767 -- ResourceDB
ORDER BY [CPU Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database is using the most CPU resources on the instance


-- Get I/O utilization by database (Query 36) (IO Usage By Database)
WITH Aggregate_IO_Statistics
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(SUM(num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/1048576 AS DECIMAL(12, 2)) AS io_in_mb
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS [DM_IO_STATS]
GROUP BY database_id)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY io_in_mb DESC) AS [I/O Rank], [Database Name], io_in_mb AS [Total I/O (MB)],
       CAST(io_in_mb/ SUM(io_in_mb) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [I/O Percent]
FROM Aggregate_IO_Statistics
ORDER BY [I/O Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database is using the most I/O resources on the instance


-- Get total buffer usage by database for current instance  (Query 37) (Total Buffer Usage by Database)
-- This make take some time to run on a busy instance
WITH AggregateBufferPoolUsage
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(COUNT(*) * 8/1024.0 AS DECIMAL (10,2))  AS [CachedSize]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE database_id <> 32767 -- ResourceDB
GROUP BY DB_NAME(database_id))
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY CachedSize DESC) AS [Buffer Pool Rank], [Database Name], CachedSize AS [Cached Size (MB)],
       CAST(CachedSize / SUM(CachedSize) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [Buffer Pool Percent]
FROM AggregateBufferPoolUsage
ORDER BY [Buffer Pool Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you how much memory (in the buffer pool) 
-- is being used by each database on the instance


-- Get tempdb version store space usage by database (Query 38) (Version Store Space Usage)
SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
       reserved_page_count AS [Version Store Reserved Page Count], 
	   reserved_space_kb/1024 AS [Version Store Reserved Space (MB)] 
FROM sys.dm_tran_version_store_space_usage WITH (NOLOCK) 
ORDER BY reserved_space_kb/1024 DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------  

-- sys.dm_tran_version_store_space_usage (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2vh3Bmk




-- Clear Wait Stats with this command
-- DBCC SQLPERF('sys.dm_os_wait_stats', CLEAR);

-- Isolate top waits for server instance since last restart or wait statistics clear  (Query 39) (Top Waits)
WITH [Waits] 
AS (SELECT wait_type, wait_time_ms/ 1000.0 AS [WaitS],
          (wait_time_ms - signal_wait_time_ms) / 1000.0 AS [ResourceS],
           signal_wait_time_ms / 1000.0 AS [SignalS],
           waiting_tasks_count AS [WaitCount],
           100.0 *  wait_time_ms / SUM (wait_time_ms) OVER() AS [Percentage],
           ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY wait_time_ms DESC) AS [RowNum]
    FROM sys.dm_os_wait_stats WITH (NOLOCK)
    WHERE [wait_type] NOT IN (
        N'BROKER_EVENTHANDLER', N'BROKER_RECEIVE_WAITFOR', N'BROKER_TASK_STOP',
		N'BROKER_TO_FLUSH', N'BROKER_TRANSMITTER', N'CHECKPOINT_QUEUE',
        N'CHKPT', N'CLR_AUTO_EVENT', N'CLR_MANUAL_EVENT', N'CLR_SEMAPHORE', N'CXCONSUMER',
        N'DBMIRROR_DBM_EVENT', N'DBMIRROR_EVENTS_QUEUE', N'DBMIRROR_WORKER_QUEUE',
		N'DBMIRRORING_CMD', N'DIRTY_PAGE_POLL', N'DISPATCHER_QUEUE_SEMAPHORE',
        N'EXECSYNC', N'FSAGENT', N'FT_IFTS_SCHEDULER_IDLE_WAIT', N'FT_IFTSHC_MUTEX',
        N'HADR_CLUSAPI_CALL', N'HADR_FILESTREAM_IOMGR_IOCOMPLETION', N'HADR_LOGCAPTURE_WAIT', 
		N'HADR_NOTIFICATION_DEQUEUE', N'HADR_TIMER_TASK', N'HADR_WORK_QUEUE',
        N'KSOURCE_WAKEUP', N'LAZYWRITER_SLEEP', N'LOGMGR_QUEUE', 
		N'MEMORY_ALLOCATION_EXT', N'ONDEMAND_TASK_QUEUE',
		N'PARALLEL_REDO_DRAIN_WORKER', N'PARALLEL_REDO_LOG_CACHE', N'PARALLEL_REDO_TRAN_LIST',
		N'PARALLEL_REDO_WORKER_SYNC', N'PARALLEL_REDO_WORKER_WAIT_WORK',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_HADR_LEASE_MECHANISM', N'PREEMPTIVE_SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_LIBRARYOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_COMOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_CRYPTOPS',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_PIPEOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_AUTHENTICATIONOPS',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_GENERICOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_VERIFYTRUST',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_FILEOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_DEVICEOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_QUERYREGISTRY',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_WRITEFILE',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_CALLBACKEXECUTE', N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_DISPATCHER',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_GETTARGETSTATE', N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_SESSIONCOMMIT',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_TARGETINIT', N'PREEMPTIVE_XE_TARGETFINALIZE',
        N'PWAIT_ALL_COMPONENTS_INITIALIZED', N'PWAIT_DIRECTLOGCONSUMER_GETNEXT',
		N'QDS_PERSIST_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP',
		N'QDS_ASYNC_QUEUE',
        N'QDS_CLEANUP_STALE_QUERIES_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP', N'REQUEST_FOR_DEADLOCK_SEARCH',
		N'RESOURCE_QUEUE', N'SERVER_IDLE_CHECK', N'SLEEP_BPOOL_FLUSH', N'SLEEP_DBSTARTUP',
		N'SLEEP_DCOMSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_MASTERDBREADY', N'SLEEP_MASTERMDREADY',
        N'SLEEP_MASTERUPGRADED', N'SLEEP_MSDBSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_SYSTEMTASK', N'SLEEP_TASK',
        N'SLEEP_TEMPDBSTARTUP', N'SNI_HTTP_ACCEPT', N'SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS_SLEEP',
		N'SQLTRACE_BUFFER_FLUSH', N'SQLTRACE_INCREMENTAL_FLUSH_SLEEP', N'SQLTRACE_WAIT_ENTRIES',
		N'WAIT_FOR_RESULTS', N'WAITFOR', N'WAITFOR_TASKSHUTDOWN', N'WAIT_XTP_HOST_WAIT',
		N'WAIT_XTP_OFFLINE_CKPT_NEW_LOG', N'WAIT_XTP_CKPT_CLOSE', N'WAIT_XTP_RECOVERY',
		N'XE_BUFFERMGR_ALLPROCESSED_EVENT', N'XE_DISPATCHER_JOIN',
        N'XE_DISPATCHER_WAIT', N'XE_LIVE_TARGET_TVF', N'XE_TIMER_EVENT')
    AND waiting_tasks_count > 0)
SELECT
    MAX (W1.wait_type) AS [WaitType],
	CAST (MAX (W1.Percentage) AS DECIMAL (5,2)) AS [Wait Percentage],
	CAST ((MAX (W1.WaitS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgWait_Sec],
    CAST ((MAX (W1.ResourceS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgRes_Sec],
    CAST ((MAX (W1.SignalS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgSig_Sec], 
    CAST (MAX (W1.WaitS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Wait_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.ResourceS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Resource_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.SignalS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Signal_Sec],
    MAX (W1.WaitCount) AS [Wait Count],
	CAST (N'https://www.sqlskills.com/help/waits/' + W1.wait_type AS XML) AS [Help/Info URL]
FROM Waits AS W1
INNER JOIN Waits AS W2
ON W2.RowNum <= W1.RowNum
GROUP BY W1.RowNum, W1.wait_type
HAVING SUM (W2.Percentage) - MAX (W1.Percentage) < 99 -- percentage threshold
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Cumulative wait stats are not as useful on an idle instance that is not under load or performance pressure

-- SQL Server Wait Types Library (Paul Randal)
-- https://bit.ly/2ePzYO2

-- The SQL Server Wait Type Repository
-- https://bit.ly/1afzfjC

-- Wait statistics, or please tell me where it hurts
-- https://bit.ly/2wsQHQE

-- SQL Server 2005 Performance Tuning using the Waits and Queues
-- https://bit.ly/1o2NFoF

-- sys.dm_os_wait_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2Hjq9Yl



-- Get a count of SQL connections by IP address (Query 40) (Connection Counts by IP Address)
SELECT ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name, 
COUNT(ec.session_id) AS [connection count] 
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions AS es WITH (NOLOCK) 
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_connections AS ec WITH (NOLOCK) 
ON es.session_id = ec.session_id 
GROUP BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name  
ORDER BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you figure where your database load is coming from
-- and verifies connectivity from other machines

-- Solving Connectivity errors to SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2EgzoD0



-- Get Average Task Counts (run multiple times)  (Query 41) (Avg Task Counts)
SELECT AVG(current_tasks_count) AS [Avg Task Count], 
AVG(work_queue_count) AS [Avg Work Queue Count],
AVG(runnable_tasks_count) AS [Avg Runnable Task Count],
AVG(pending_disk_io_count) AS [Avg Pending DiskIO Count]
FROM sys.dm_os_schedulers WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE scheduler_id < 255 OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Sustained values above 10 suggest further investigation in that area
-- High Avg Task Counts are often caused by blocking/deadlocking or other resource contention

-- Sustained values above 1 suggest further investigation in that area
-- High Avg Runnable Task Counts are a good sign of CPU pressure
-- High Avg Pending DiskIO Counts are a sign of disk pressure

-- How to Do Some Very Basic SQL Server Monitoring
-- https://bit.ly/2q3Btgt



-- Detect blocking (run multiple times)  (Query 42) (Detect Blocking)
SELECT t1.resource_type AS [lock type], DB_NAME(resource_database_id) AS [database],
t1.resource_associated_entity_id AS [blk object],t1.request_mode AS [lock req],  -- lock requested
t1.request_session_id AS [waiter sid], t2.wait_duration_ms AS [wait time],       -- spid of waiter  
(SELECT [text] FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r WITH (NOLOCK)                      -- get sql for waiter
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.[sql_handle]) 
WHERE r.session_id = t1.request_session_id) AS [waiter_batch],
(SELECT SUBSTRING(qt.[text],r.statement_start_offset/2, 
    (CASE WHEN r.statement_end_offset = -1 
    THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 
    ELSE r.statement_end_offset END - r.statement_start_offset)/2) 
FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.[sql_handle]) AS qt
WHERE r.session_id = t1.request_session_id) AS [waiter_stmt],					-- statement blocked
t2.blocking_session_id AS [blocker sid],										-- spid of blocker
(SELECT [text] FROM sys.sysprocesses AS p										-- get sql for blocker
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(p.[sql_handle]) 
WHERE p.spid = t2.blocking_session_id) AS [blocker_batch]
FROM sys.dm_tran_locks AS t1 WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_waiting_tasks AS t2 WITH (NOLOCK)
ON t1.lock_owner_address = t2.resource_address OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps troubleshoot blocking and deadlocking issues
-- The results will change from second to second on a busy system
-- You should run this query multiple times when you see signs of blocking



-- Get CPU Utilization History for last 256 minutes (in one minute intervals)  (Query 43) (CPU Utilization History)
DECLARE @ts_now bigint = (SELECT cpu_ticks/(cpu_ticks/ms_ticks) FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info WITH (NOLOCK)); 

SELECT TOP(256) SQLProcessUtilization AS [SQL Server Process CPU Utilization], 
               SystemIdle AS [System Idle Process], 
               100 - SystemIdle - SQLProcessUtilization AS [Other Process CPU Utilization], 
               DATEADD(ms, -1 * (@ts_now - [timestamp]), GETDATE()) AS [Event Time] 
FROM (SELECT record.value('(./Record/@id)[1]', 'int') AS record_id, 
			record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/SystemIdle)[1]', 'int') 
			AS [SystemIdle], 
			record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/ProcessUtilization)[1]', 'int') 
			AS [SQLProcessUtilization], [timestamp] 
	  FROM (SELECT [timestamp], CONVERT(xml, record) AS [record] 
			FROM sys.dm_os_ring_buffers WITH (NOLOCK)
			WHERE ring_buffer_type = N'RING_BUFFER_SCHEDULER_MONITOR' 
			AND record LIKE N'%<SystemHealth>%') AS x) AS y 
ORDER BY record_id DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at the trend over the entire period 
-- Also look at high sustained 'Other Process' CPU Utilization values
-- Note: This query sometimes gives inaccurate results (negative values)
-- on high core count (> 64 cores) systems


-- Get top total worker time queries for entire instance (Query 44) (Top Worker Time Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], 
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 255), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text],  
qs.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time], qs.min_worker_time AS [Min Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.max_worker_time AS [Max Worker Time], 
qs.min_elapsed_time AS [Min Elapsed Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time AS [Max Elapsed Time],
qs.min_logical_reads AS [Min Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.max_logical_reads AS [Max Logical Reads], 
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Helps you find the most expensive queries from a CPU perspective across the entire instance
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues



-- Page Life Expectancy (PLE) value for each NUMA node in current instance  (Query 45) (PLE by NUMA Node)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], RTRIM([object_name]) AS [Object Name], instance_name, cntr_value AS [Page Life Expectancy]
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N'%Buffer Node%' -- Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N'Page life expectancy' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- PLE is a good measurement of internal memory pressure
-- Higher PLE is better. Watch the trend over time, not the absolute value
-- This will only return one row for non-NUMA systems

-- Page Life Expectancy isn�t what you think�
-- https://bit.ly/2EgynLa


-- Memory Grants Pending value for current instance  (Query 46) (Memory Grants Pending)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], RTRIM([object_name]) AS [Object Name], cntr_value AS [Memory Grants Pending]                                                                                                       
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N'%Memory Manager%' -- Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N'Memory Grants Pending' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Run multiple times, and run periodically if you suspect you are under memory pressure
-- Memory Grants Pending above zero for a sustained period is a very strong indicator of internal memory pressure


-- Memory Clerk Usage for instance  (Query 47) (Memory Clerk Usage)
-- Look for high value for CACHESTORE_SQLCP (Ad-hoc query plans)
SELECT TOP(10) mc.[type] AS [Memory Clerk Type], 
       CAST((SUM(mc.pages_kb)/1024.0) AS DECIMAL (15,2)) AS [Memory Usage (MB)] 
FROM sys.dm_os_memory_clerks AS mc WITH (NOLOCK)
GROUP BY mc.[type]  
ORDER BY SUM(mc.pages_kb) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- MEMORYCLERK_SQLBUFFERPOOL was new for SQL Server 2012. It should be your highest consumer of memory

-- CACHESTORE_SQLCP  SQL Plans         
-- These are cached SQL statements or batches that aren't in stored procedures, functions and triggers
-- Watch out for high values for CACHESTORE_SQLCP
-- Enabling 'optimize for ad hoc workloads' at the instance level can help reduce this
-- Running DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE ('SQL Plans') periodically may be required to better control this

-- CACHESTORE_OBJCP  Object Plans      
-- These are compiled plans for stored procedures, functions and triggers

-- sys.dm_os_memory_clerks (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2H31xDR



-- Find single-use, ad-hoc and prepared queries that are bloating the plan cache  (Query 48) (Ad hoc Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], t.[text] AS [Query Text], 
cp.objtype AS [Object Type], cp.cacheobjtype AS [Cache Object Type],  
cp.size_in_bytes/1024 AS [Plan Size in KB]
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t
WHERE cp.cacheobjtype = N'Compiled Plan' 
AND cp.objtype IN (N'Adhoc', N'Prepared') 
AND cp.usecounts = 1
ORDER BY cp.size_in_bytes DESC, DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you the text, type and size of single-use ad-hoc and prepared queries that waste space in the plan cache
-- Enabling 'optimize for ad hoc workloads' for the instance can help (SQL Server 2008 and above only)
-- Running DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE ('SQL Plans') periodically may be required to better control this
-- Enabling forced parameterization for the database can help, but test first!

-- Plan cache, adhoc workloads and clearing the single-use plan cache bloat
-- https://bit.ly/2EfYOkl


-- Get top total logical reads queries for entire instance (Query 49) (Top Logical Reads Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name],
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 255), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text], 
qs.total_logical_reads AS [Total Logical Reads],
qs.min_logical_reads AS [Min Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.max_logical_reads AS [Max Logical Reads],   
qs.min_worker_time AS [Min Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.max_worker_time AS [Max Worker Time], 
qs.min_elapsed_time AS [Min Elapsed Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time AS [Max Elapsed Time],
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count], 
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Helps you find the most expensive queries from a memory perspective across the entire instance
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues


-- Get top average elapsed time queries for entire instance (Query 50) (Top Avg Elapsed Time Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], 
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 255), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text],  
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
qs.min_elapsed_time, qs.max_elapsed_time, qs.last_elapsed_time,
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],  
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads], 
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Physical Reads], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you find the highest average elapsed time queries across the entire instance
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues


-- Look at UDF execution statistics (Query 51) (UDF Stats by DB)
SELECT TOP (25) DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name], 
		   OBJECT_NAME(object_id, database_id) AS [Function Name],
		   total_worker_time, execution_count, total_elapsed_time,  
           total_elapsed_time/execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],  
           last_elapsed_time, last_execution_time, cached_time, [type_desc] 
FROM sys.dm_exec_function_stats WITH (NOLOCK) 
ORDER BY total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- sys.dm_exec_function_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2q1Q6BM



-- Database specific queries *****************************************************************

-- **** Please switch to a user database that you are interested in! *****
--USE YourDatabaseName; -- make sure to change to an actual database on your instance, not the master system database
--GO

-- Individual File Sizes and space available for current database  (Query 52) (File Sizes and Space)
SELECT f.name AS [File Name] , f.physical_name AS [Physical Name], 
CAST((f.size/128.0) AS DECIMAL(15,2)) AS [Total Size in MB],
CAST(f.size/128.0 - CAST(FILEPROPERTY(f.name, 'SpaceUsed') AS int)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(15,2)) 
AS [Available Space In MB], f.[file_id], fg.name AS [Filegroup Name],
f.is_percent_growth, f.growth, fg.is_default, fg.is_read_only, 
fg.is_autogrow_all_files
FROM sys.database_files AS f WITH (NOLOCK) 
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.filegroups AS fg WITH (NOLOCK)
ON f.data_space_id = fg.data_space_id
ORDER BY f.[file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at how large and how full the files are and where they are located
-- Make sure the transaction log is not full!!

-- is_autogrow_all_files was new for SQL Server 2016. Equivalent to TF 1117 for user databases

-- SQL Server 2016: Changes in default behavior for autogrow and allocations for tempdb and user databases
-- https://bit.ly/2evRZSR


-- Log space usage for current database  (Query 53) (Log Space Usage)
SELECT DB_NAME(lsu.database_id) AS [Database Name], db.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model],
		CAST(lsu.total_log_size_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Total Log Space (MB)],
		CAST(lsu.used_log_space_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Used Log Space (MB)], 
		CAST(lsu.used_log_space_in_percent AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Used Log Space %],
		CAST(lsu.log_space_in_bytes_since_last_backup/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Used Log Space Since Last Backup (MB)],
		db.log_reuse_wait_desc		 
FROM sys.dm_db_log_space_usage AS lsu WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.databases AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
ON lsu.database_id = db.database_id
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at log file size and usage, along with the log reuse wait description for the current database

-- sys.dm_db_log_space_usage (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2H4MQw9


-- Status of last VLF for current database  (Query 54) (Last VLF Status)
SELECT TOP(1) DB_NAME(li.database_id) AS [Database Name], li.[file_id],
              li.vlf_size_mb, li.vlf_sequence_number, li.vlf_active, li.vlf_status
FROM sys.dm_db_log_info(DB_ID()) AS li 
ORDER BY vlf_sequence_number DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Determine whether you will be able to shrink the transaction log file

-- vlf_status Values
-- 0 is inactive 
-- 1 is initialized but unused 
-- 2 is active

-- sys.dm_db_log_info (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2EQUU1v



-- Get database scoped configuration values for current database (Query 55) (Database-scoped Configurations)
SELECT configuration_id, name, [value] AS [value_for_primary], value_for_secondary
FROM sys.database_scoped_configurations WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This lets you see the value of these new properties for the current database

-- Clear plan cache for current database
-- ALTER DATABASE SCOPED CONFIGURATION CLEAR PROCEDURE_CACHE;

-- ALTER DATABASE SCOPED CONFIGURATION (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2sOH7nb


-- I/O Statistics by file for the current database  (Query 56) (IO Stats By File)
SELECT DB_NAME(DB_ID()) AS [Database Name], df.name AS [Logical Name], vfs.[file_id], df.type_desc,
df.physical_name AS [Physical Name], CAST(vfs.size_on_disk_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Size on Disk (MB)],
vfs.num_of_reads, vfs.num_of_writes, vfs.io_stall_read_ms, vfs.io_stall_write_ms,
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_read_ms/(vfs.io_stall_read_ms + vfs.io_stall_write_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_write_ms/(vfs.io_stall_write_ms + vfs.io_stall_read_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Writes Pct],
(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS [Writes + Reads], 
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_read/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Read], 
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_written/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Written],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_reads/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_writes/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Write Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_read/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Read Bytes Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_written/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Written Bytes Pct]
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(DB_ID(), NULL) AS vfs
INNER JOIN sys.database_files AS df WITH (NOLOCK)
ON vfs.[file_id]= df.[file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you characterize your workload better from an I/O perspective for this database
-- It helps you determine whether you has an OLTP or DW/DSS type of workload



-- Get most frequently executed queries for this database (Query 57) (Query Execution Counts)
SELECT TOP(50) LEFT(t.[text], 50) AS [Short Query Text], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
qs.total_logical_reads AS [Total Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time AS [Total Elapsed Time],
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
WHERE t.dbid = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Queries 58 through 63 are the "Bad Man List" for stored procedures

-- Top Cached SPs By Execution Count (Query 58) (SP Execution Counts)
SELECT TOP(100) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time],    
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you which cached stored procedures are called the most often
-- This helps you characterize and baseline your workload


-- Top Cached SPs By Avg Elapsed Time (Query 59) (SP Avg Elapsed Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.min_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time, qs.last_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], 
qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY avg_elapsed_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find high average elapsed time cached stored procedures that
-- may be easy to optimize with standard query tuning techniques



-- Top Cached SPs By Total Worker time. Worker time relates to CPU cost  (Query 60) (SP Worker Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a CPU perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of CPU pressure


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Reads. Logical reads relate to memory pressure  (Query 61) (SP Logical Reads)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_reads AS [TotalLogicalReads], 
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalReads],qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute], 
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a memory perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of memory pressure


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Physical Reads. Physical reads relate to disk read I/O pressure  (Query 62) (SP Physical Reads)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name],qs.total_physical_reads AS [TotalPhysicalReads], 
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgPhysicalReads], qs.execution_count, 
qs.total_logical_reads,qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan 
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND qs.total_physical_reads > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_physical_reads DESC, qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a read I/O perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of I/O pressure or of memory pressure
       


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Writes (Query 63) (SP Logical Writes)
-- Logical writes relate to both memory and disk I/O pressure 
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_writes AS [TotalLogicalWrites], 
qs.total_logical_writes/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalWrites], qs.execution_count,
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan 
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND qs.total_logical_writes > 0
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_writes DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a write I/O perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of I/O pressure or of memory pressure


-- Lists the top statements by average input/output usage for the current database  (Query 64) (Top IO Statements)
SELECT TOP(50) OBJECT_NAME(qt.objectid, dbid) AS [SP Name],
(qs.total_logical_reads + qs.total_logical_writes) /qs.execution_count AS [Avg IO], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
SUBSTRING(qt.[text],qs.statement_start_offset/2, 
	(CASE 
		WHEN qs.statement_end_offset = -1 
	 THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 
		ELSE qs.statement_end_offset 
	 END - qs.statement_start_offset)/2) AS [Query Text]	
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) AS qt
WHERE qt.[dbid] = DB_ID()
ORDER BY [Avg IO] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you find the most expensive statements for I/O by SP



-- Possible Bad NC Indexes (writes > reads)  (Query 65) (Bad NC Indexes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(s.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], i.name AS [Index Name], i.index_id, 
i.is_disabled, i.is_hypothetical, i.has_filter, i.fill_factor,
s.user_updates AS [Total Writes], s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads],
s.user_updates - (s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups) AS [Difference]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(s.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
AND s.user_updates > (s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups)
AND i.index_id > 1 AND i.[type_desc] = N'NONCLUSTERED'
AND i.is_primary_key = 0 AND i.is_unique_constraint = 0 AND i.is_unique = 0
ORDER BY [Difference] DESC, [Total Writes] DESC, [Total Reads] ASC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look for indexes with high numbers of writes and zero or very low numbers of reads
-- Consider your complete workload, and how long your instance has been running
-- Investigate further before dropping an index!


-- Missing Indexes for current database by Index Advantage  (Query 66) (Missing Indexes)
SELECT CONVERT(decimal(18,2), user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01)) AS [index_advantage], 
migs.last_user_seek, mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement]) AS [missing_indexes_for_table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement], equality_columns) AS [similar_missing_indexes_for_table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, 
CONVERT(decimal(18,2), migs.avg_total_user_cost) AS [avg_total_user_cost], migs.avg_user_impact,
OBJECT_NAME(mid.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], p.rows AS [Table Rows]
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = mid.[object_id]
WHERE mid.database_id = DB_ID()
AND p.index_id < 2 
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at index advantage, last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
-- SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware
-- Do not just blindly add indexes that show up from this query!!!


-- Find missing index warnings for cached plans in the current database  (Query 67) (Missing Index Warnings)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a busy instance
SELECT TOP(25) OBJECT_NAME(objectid) AS [ObjectName], 
               cp.objtype, cp.usecounts, cp.size_in_bytes, query_plan
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(cp.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE CAST(query_plan AS NVARCHAR(MAX)) LIKE N'%MissingIndex%'
AND dbid = DB_ID()
ORDER BY cp.usecounts DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you connect missing indexes to specific stored procedures or queries
-- This can help you decide whether to add them or not


-- Breaks down buffers used by current database by object (table, index) in the buffer cache  (Query 68) (Buffer Usage)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a busy instance
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) AS [Object Name], p.index_id, 
CAST(COUNT(*)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Buffer size(MB)],  
COUNT(*) AS [BufferCount], p.[Rows] AS [Row Count],
p.data_compression_desc AS [Compression Type]
FROM sys.allocation_units AS a WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors AS b WITH (NOLOCK)
ON a.allocation_unit_id = b.allocation_unit_id
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON a.container_id = p.hobt_id
WHERE b.database_id = CONVERT(int, DB_ID())
AND p.[object_id] > 100
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'plan_%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'xml_index_nodes%'
GROUP BY p.[object_id], p.index_id, p.data_compression_desc, p.[Rows]
ORDER BY [BufferCount] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you what tables and indexes are using the most memory in the buffer cache
-- It can help identify possible candidates for data compression


-- Get Table names, row counts, and compression status for clustered index or heap  (Query 69) (Table Sizes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS [ObjectName], 
SUM(Rows) AS [RowCount], data_compression_desc AS [CompressionType]
FROM sys.partitions WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE index_id < 2 --ignore the partitions from the non-clustered index if any
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'queue_%' 
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'filestream_tombstone%' 
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'fulltext%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'ifts_comp_fragment%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'filetable_updates%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'xml_index_nodes%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'sqlagent_job%'  
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'plan_persist%'  
GROUP BY object_id, data_compression_desc
ORDER BY SUM(Rows) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you an idea of table sizes, and possible data compression opportunities



-- Get some key table properties (Query 70) (Table Properties)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], p.[rows] AS [Table Rows], p.index_id, 
       p.data_compression_desc AS [Index Data Compression],
       t.create_date, t.lock_on_bulk_load, t.is_replicated, t.has_replication_filter, 
       t.is_tracked_by_cdc, t.lock_escalation_desc, t.is_filetable, 
	   t.is_memory_optimized, t.durability_desc, 
	   t.temporal_type_desc, t.is_remote_data_archive_enabled, t.is_external -- new for SQL Server 2016
FROM sys.tables AS t WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON t.[object_id] = p.[object_id]
WHERE OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
ORDER BY OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]), p.index_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some good information about your tables
-- is_memory_optimized and durability_desc were new in SQL Server 2014
-- temporal_type_desc, is_remote_data_archive_enabled, is_external were new in SQL Server 2016

-- sys.tables (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2Gk7998



-- When were Statistics last updated on all indexes?  (Query 71) (Statistics Update)
SELECT SCHEMA_NAME(o.Schema_ID) + N'.' + o.[NAME] AS [Object Name], o.[type_desc] AS [Object Type],
      i.[name] AS [Index Name], STATS_DATE(i.[object_id], i.index_id) AS [Statistics Date], 
      s.auto_created, s.no_recompute, s.user_created, s.is_incremental, s.is_temporary,
	  st.row_count, st.used_page_count
FROM sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON o.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id] 
AND i.index_id = s.stats_id
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_partition_stats AS st WITH (NOLOCK)
ON o.[object_id] = st.[object_id]
AND i.[index_id] = st.[index_id]
WHERE o.[type] IN ('U', 'V')
AND st.row_count > 0
ORDER BY STATS_DATE(i.[object_id], i.index_id) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------  

-- Helps discover possible problems with out-of-date statistics
-- Also gives you an idea which indexes are the most active

-- sys.stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2GyAxrn

-- UPDATEs to Statistics (Erin Stellato)
-- https://bit.ly/2vhrYQy




-- Look at most frequently modified indexes and statistics (Query 72) (Volatile Indexes)
SELECT o.[name] AS [Object Name], o.[object_id], o.[type_desc], s.[name] AS [Statistics Name], 
       s.stats_id, s.no_recompute, s.auto_created, s.is_incremental, s.is_temporary,
	   sp.modification_counter, sp.[rows], sp.rows_sampled, sp.last_updated
FROM sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.object_id = o.object_id
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_db_stats_properties(s.object_id, s.stats_id) AS sp
WHERE o.[type_desc] NOT IN (N'SYSTEM_TABLE', N'INTERNAL_TABLE')
AND sp.modification_counter > 0
ORDER BY sp.modification_counter DESC, o.name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you understand your workload and make better decisions about 
-- things like data compression and adding new indexes to a table



-- Get fragmentation info for all indexes above a certain size in the current database  (Query 73) (Index Fragmentation)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a very large database
SELECT DB_NAME(ps.database_id) AS [Database Name], SCHEMA_NAME(o.[schema_id]) AS [Schema Name],
OBJECT_NAME(ps.OBJECT_ID) AS [Object Name], i.[name] AS [Index Name], ps.index_id, 
ps.index_type_desc, ps.avg_fragmentation_in_percent, 
ps.fragment_count, ps.page_count, i.fill_factor, i.has_filter, 
i.filter_definition, i.[allow_page_locks]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats(DB_ID(),NULL, NULL, NULL , N'LIMITED') AS ps
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ps.[object_id] = i.[object_id] 
AND ps.index_id = i.index_id
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
WHERE ps.database_id = DB_ID()
AND ps.page_count > 2500
ORDER BY ps.avg_fragmentation_in_percent DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine whether you have framentation in your relational indexes
-- and how effective your index maintenance strategy is


--- Index Read/Write stats (all tables in current DB) ordered by Reads  (Query 74) (Overall Index Usage - Reads)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], i.[name] AS [IndexName], i.index_id, 
       s.user_seeks, s.user_scans, s.user_lookups,
	   s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads], 
	   s.user_updates AS [Writes],  
	   i.[type_desc] AS [Index Type], i.fill_factor AS [Fill Factor], i.has_filter, i.filter_definition, 
	   s.last_user_scan, s.last_user_lookup, s.last_user_seek
FROM sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(i.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
ORDER BY s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE); -- Order by reads
------

-- Show which indexes in the current database are most active for Reads


--- Index Read/Write stats (all tables in current DB) ordered by Writes  (Query 75) (Overall Index Usage - Writes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], i.[name] AS [IndexName], i.index_id,
	   s.user_updates AS [Writes], s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads], 
	   i.[type_desc] AS [Index Type], i.fill_factor AS [Fill Factor], i.has_filter, i.filter_definition,
	   s.last_system_update, s.last_user_update
FROM sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(i.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
ORDER BY s.user_updates DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);						 -- Order by writes
------

-- Show which indexes in the current database are most active for Writes


-- Get in-memory OLTP index usage (Query 76) (XTP Index Usage)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [Object Name], i.index_id, i.[name] AS [Index Name],
       i.[type_desc], xis.scans_started, xis.scans_retries, 
	   xis.rows_touched, xis.rows_returned
FROM sys.dm_db_xtp_index_stats AS xis WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = xis.[object_id] 
AND i.index_id = xis.index_id 
ORDER BY OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This gives you some index usage statistics for in-memory OLTP
-- Returns no data if you are not using in-memory OLTP

-- Guidelines for Using Indexes on Memory-Optimized Tables
-- https://bit.ly/2GCP8lF



-- Look at Columnstore index physical statistics (Query 77) (Columnstore Index Physical Stat)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(ps.object_id) AS [TableName],  
	i.[name] AS [IndexName], ps.index_id, ps.partition_number,
	ps.delta_store_hobt_id, ps.state_desc, ps.total_rows, ps.size_in_bytes,
	ps.trim_reason_desc, ps.generation, ps.transition_to_compressed_state_desc,
	ps.has_vertipaq_optimization, ps.deleted_rows,
	100 * (ISNULL(ps.deleted_rows, 0))/ps.total_rows AS [Fragmentation]
FROM sys.dm_db_column_store_row_group_physical_stats AS ps WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ps.object_id = i.object_id 
AND ps.index_id = i.index_id
ORDER BY ps.object_id, ps.partition_number, ps.row_group_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- sys.dm_db_column_store_row_group_physical_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2q276XQ



-- Get lock waits for current database (Query 78) (Lock Waits)
SELECT o.name AS [table_name], i.name AS [index_name], ios.index_id, ios.partition_number,
		SUM(ios.row_lock_wait_count) AS [total_row_lock_waits], 
		SUM(ios.row_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_row_lock_wait_in_ms],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_count) AS [total_page_lock_waits],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_page_lock_wait_in_ms],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms)+ SUM(row_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_lock_wait_in_ms]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_operational_stats(DB_ID(), NULL, NULL, NULL) AS ios
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ios.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ios.[object_id] = i.[object_id] 
AND ios.index_id = i.index_id
WHERE o.[object_id] > 100
GROUP BY o.name, i.name, ios.index_id, ios.partition_number
HAVING SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms)+ SUM(row_lock_wait_in_ms) > 0
ORDER BY total_lock_wait_in_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This query is helpful for troubleshooting blocking and deadlocking issues



-- Look at UDF execution statistics (Query 79) (UDF Statistics)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS [Function Name], execution_count,
	   total_worker_time, total_logical_reads, total_physical_reads, total_elapsed_time, 
	   total_elapsed_time/execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
	   FORMAT(cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
FROM sys.dm_exec_function_stats WITH (NOLOCK) 
WHERE database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE); 
------

-- New for SQL Server 2016
-- Helps you investigate scalar UDF performance issues
-- Does not return information for table valued functions

-- sys.dm_exec_function_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2q1Q6BM


-- Get QueryStore Options for this database (Query 80) (QueryStore Options)
SELECT actual_state_desc, desired_state_desc, [interval_length_minutes],
       current_storage_size_mb, [max_storage_size_mb], 
	   query_capture_mode_desc, size_based_cleanup_mode_desc
FROM sys.database_query_store_options WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- New for SQL Server 2016
-- Requires that Query Store is enabled for this database

-- Tuning Workload Performance with Query Store
-- https://bit.ly/1kHSl7w


-- Get highest aggregate duration queries over last hour (Query 81) (High Aggregate Duration Queries)
WITH AggregatedDurationLastHour
AS
(SELECT q.query_id, SUM(count_executions * avg_duration) AS total_duration,
   COUNT (distinct p.plan_id) AS number_of_plans
   FROM sys.query_store_query_text AS qt WITH (NOLOCK)
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query AS q WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON qt.query_text_id = q.query_text_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_plan AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON q.query_id = p.query_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_runtime_stats AS rs WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON rs.plan_id = p.plan_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_runtime_stats_interval AS rsi WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON rsi.runtime_stats_interval_id = rs.runtime_stats_interval_id
   WHERE rsi.start_time >= DATEADD(hour, -1, GETUTCDATE()) 
   AND rs.execution_type_desc = N'Regular'
   GROUP BY q.query_id),
OrderedDuration AS
(SELECT query_id, total_duration, number_of_plans, 
 ROW_NUMBER () OVER (ORDER BY total_duration DESC, query_id) AS RN
 FROM AggregatedDurationLastHour)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(q.object_id) AS [Containing Object], qt.query_sql_text, 
od.total_duration AS [Total Duration (microsecs)], 
od.number_of_plans AS [Plan Count],
p.is_forced_plan, p.is_parallel_plan, p.is_trivial_plan,
q.query_parameterization_type_desc, p.[compatibility_level],
p.last_compile_start_time, q.last_execution_time,
CONVERT(xml, p.query_plan) AS query_plan_xml 
FROM OrderedDuration AS od 
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query AS q WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_id  = od.query_id
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query_text AS qt WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_text_id = qt.query_text_id
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_plan AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_id = p.query_id
WHERE od.RN <= 50 
ORDER BY total_duration DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- New for SQL Server 2016
-- Requires that QueryStore is enabled for this database



-- Get highest aggregate CPU time queries over last hour (Query 82) (High Aggregate CPU Queries)
WITH AggregatedCPULastHour
AS
(SELECT q.query_id, SUM(rs.count_executions * rs.avg_cpu_time) AS total_cpu_time,
   COUNT (DISTINCT p.plan_id) AS number_of_plans
   FROM sys.query_store_query_text AS qt WITH (NOLOCK)
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query AS q WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON qt.query_text_id = q.query_text_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_plan AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON q.query_id = p.query_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_runtime_stats AS rs WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON rs.plan_id = p.plan_id
   INNER JOIN sys.query_store_runtime_stats_interval AS rsi WITH (NOLOCK)
   ON rsi.runtime_stats_interval_id = rs.runtime_stats_interval_id
   WHERE rsi.start_time >= DATEADD(hour, -1, GETUTCDATE()) 
   AND rs.execution_type_desc = N'Regular'
   GROUP BY q.query_id), OrderedDuration 
AS
(SELECT query_id, total_cpu_time, number_of_plans, 
 ROW_NUMBER () OVER (ORDER BY total_cpu_time DESC, query_id) AS RN
 FROM AggregatedCPULastHour)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(q.object_id) AS [Containing Object], qt.query_sql_text, 
od.total_cpu_time AS [Total CPU Time (microsecs)], 
od.number_of_plans AS [Plan Count],
p.is_forced_plan, p.is_parallel_plan, p.is_trivial_plan,
q.query_parameterization_type_desc, p.[compatibility_level],
p.last_compile_start_time, 
q.last_execution_time,
CONVERT(xml, p.query_plan) AS query_plan_xml 
FROM OrderedDuration AS od 
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query AS q WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_id  = od.query_id
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_query_text AS qt WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_text_id = qt.query_text_id
INNER JOIN sys.query_store_plan AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON q.query_id = p.query_id
WHERE od.RN <= 50 
ORDER BY od.total_cpu_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- New for SQL Server 2016
-- Requires that QueryStore is enabled for this database




-- Get input buffer information for the current database (Query 83) (Input Buffer)
SELECT es.session_id, DB_NAME(es.database_id) AS [Database Name],
       es.login_time, es.cpu_time, es.logical_reads, es.memory_usage,
       es.[status], ib.event_info AS [Input Buffer]
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions AS es WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_input_buffer(es.session_id, NULL) AS ib
WHERE es.database_id = DB_ID()
AND es.session_id > 50
AND es.session_id <> @@SPID OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you input buffer information from all non-system sessions for the current database
-- Replaces DBCC INPUTBUFFER

-- New DMF for retrieving input buffer in SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2uHKMbz

-- sys.dm_exec_input_buffer (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2J5Hf9q



-- Look at recent Full backups for the current database (Query 84) (Recent Full Backups)
SELECT TOP (30) bs.machine_name, bs.server_name, bs.database_name AS [Database Name], bs.recovery_model,
CONVERT (BIGINT, bs.backup_size / 1048576 ) AS [Uncompressed Backup Size (MB)],
CONVERT (BIGINT, bs.compressed_backup_size / 1048576 ) AS [Compressed Backup Size (MB)],
CONVERT (NUMERIC (20,2), (CONVERT (FLOAT, bs.backup_size) /
CONVERT (FLOAT, bs.compressed_backup_size))) AS [Compression Ratio], bs.has_backup_checksums, bs.is_copy_only, bs.encryptor_type,
DATEDIFF (SECOND, bs.backup_start_date, bs.backup_finish_date) AS [Backup Elapsed Time (sec)],
bs.backup_finish_date AS [Backup Finish Date], bmf.physical_device_name AS [Backup Location], bmf.physical_block_size
FROM msdb.dbo.backupset AS bs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.backupmediafamily AS bmf WITH (NOLOCK)
ON bs.media_set_id = bmf.media_set_id  
WHERE bs.database_name = DB_NAME(DB_ID())
AND bs.[type] = 'D' -- Change to L if you want Log backups
ORDER BY bs.backup_finish_date DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Are your backup sizes and times changing over time?
-- Are you using backup compression?
-- Are you using backup checksums?
-- Are you doing copy_only backups?
-- Are you doing encrypted backups?
-- Have you done any backup tuning with striped backups, or changing the parameters of the backup command?

-- In SQL Server 2016, native SQL Server backup compression actually works 
-- much better with databases that are using TDE than in previous versions
-- https://bit.ly/28Rpb2x


-- These three Pluralsight Courses go into more detail about how to run these queries and interpret the results

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 1 
-- https://bit.ly/2plxCer

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 2
-- https://bit.ly/2IuJpzI

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 3
-- https://bit.ly/2FIlCPb



-- Sign up for Microsoft Visual Studio Dev Essentials and get a free three month pass to Pluralsight

-- Microsoft Visual Studio Dev Essentials
-- http://bit.ly/1q6xbDL


-- Sign up for Microsoft Azure Essentials and get lots of free Azure usage credits, MCP exam voucher, three month Pluralsight subscription

-- Microsoft Azure Essentials
-- https://bit.ly/2JMWe8x


-- August 2017 blog series about upgrading and migrating SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2ftKVrX
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\Connection\PSSessionContainer.cs
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Management.Automation.Runspaces;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Connection
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The container that lists all sessions for a given runspace
    /// </summary>
    public class PSSessionContainer
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The runspace that owns the sessions
        /// </summary>
        public readonly Guid Runspace;

        /// <summary>
        /// The count of expired sessions registered
        /// </summary>
        public int CountExpired { get { return GetExpiredNames().Count; } }

        /// <summary>
        /// List of sessions and their associated computer names
        /// </summary>
        public Dictionary<string, PSSession> Sessions = new Dictionary<string, PSSession>();

        /// <summary>
        /// List of timestamps, when the last command was run against them
        /// </summary>
        public Dictionary<string, DateTime> ConnectionTimestamps = new Dictionary<string, DateTime>();

        /// <summary>
        /// Creates a list of sessions the current runspace is connected to.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Runspace">The Guid of the runspace that is the owner of the registered sessions</param>
        public PSSessionContainer(Guid Runspace)
        {
            this.Runspace = Runspace;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns the requested session.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="ComputerName">The name of the host whose connection to retrieve</param>
        /// <returns>The established connection to the host, null if none exists.</returns>
        public PSSession Get(string ComputerName)
        {
            if (Sessions.ContainsKey(ComputerName.ToLower()))
                return Sessions[ComputerName.ToLower()];
            return null;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Sets a session and writes its timestamp to the cache
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="ComputerName">The hostname it connects to.</param>
        /// <param name="Session">The session that is being registered.</param>
        public void Set(string ComputerName, PSSession Session)
        {
            if (!ConnectionHost.PSSessionCacheEnabled)
                return;
            Sessions[ComputerName.ToLower()] = Session;
            ConnectionTimestamps[ComputerName.ToLower()] = DateTime.Now;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns the name of hostnames with expired sessions
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>THe hostnames whose session has expired</returns>
        public List<string> GetExpiredNames()
        {
            List<string> expired = new List<string>();

            foreach (string key in ConnectionTimestamps.Keys)
                if (ConnectionTimestamps[key] + ConnectionHost.PSSessionTimeout < DateTime.Now && Sessions[key] != null && Sessions[key].Availability != RunspaceAvailability.Busy)
                    expired.Add(key);

            return expired;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Removes an expired session from the cache, an returns it, so it can be properly closed.
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>Returns a session to disconnect</returns>
        public PSSession PurgeExpiredSession()
        {
            foreach (string key in ConnectionTimestamps.Keys)
            {
                if (ConnectionTimestamps[key] + ConnectionHost.PSSessionTimeout < DateTime.Now && Sessions[key] != null && Sessions[key].Availability != RunspaceAvailability.Busy)
                {
                    PSSession session = Sessions[key];
                    Sessions.Remove(key);
                    ConnectionTimestamps.Remove(key);
                    return session;
                }
            }
            return null;
        }
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\Connection\SqlConnectionProtocol.cs
namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Connection
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The protocol to connect over via SMO
    /// </summary>
    public enum SqlConnectionProtocol
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Connect using any protocol available
        /// </summary>
        Any = 1,

        /// <summary>
        /// Connect using TCP/IP
        /// </summary>
        TCP = 2,

        /// <summary>
        /// Connect using named pipes or shared memory
        /// </summary>
        NP = 3
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\Database\BackupHistory.cs
using System;
using System.Numerics;
using Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Utility;

namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Database
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Object containing the information about the history of mankind ... or a database backup. WHo knows.
    /// </summary>
    public class BackupHistory
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The name of the computer running MSSQL Server
        /// </summary>
        public string ComputerName;

        /// <summary>
        /// The Instance that was queried
        /// </summary>
        public string InstanceName;

        /// <summary>
        /// The full Instance name as seen from outside
        /// </summary>
        public string SqlInstance;

        /// <summary>
        /// The Database that was backed up
        /// </summary>
        public string Database;

        /// <summary>
        /// The user that is running the backup
        /// </summary>
        public string UserName;

        /// <summary>
        /// When was the backup started
        /// </summary>
        public DateTime Start;

        /// <summary>
        /// When did the backup end
        /// </summary>
        public DateTime End;

        /// <summary>
        /// What was the longest duration among the backups
        /// </summary>
        public DbaTimeSpan Duration;

        /// <summary>
        /// Where is the backup stored
        /// </summary>
        public string[] Path;

        /// <summary>
        /// What is the total size of the backup
        /// </summary>
        public Size TotalSize;

        /// <summary>
        /// What is the total compressesed size of the backup
        /// </summary>
        public Size CompressedBackupSize;

        /// <summary>
        /// What is the ratio of total size to compressed size of the backup
        /// </summary>
        public double CompressionRatio;

        /// <summary>
        /// The kind of backup this was
        /// </summary>
        public string Type;

        /// <summary>
        /// The ID for the Backup job
        /// </summary>
        public string BackupSetId;

        /// <summary>
        /// What kind of backup-device was the backup stored to
        /// </summary>
        public string DeviceType;

        /// <summary>
        /// What is the name of the backup software?
        /// </summary>
        public string Software;

        /// <summary>
        /// The full name of the backup
        /// </summary>
        public string[] FullName;

        /// <summary>
        /// The files that are part of this backup
        /// </summary>
        public object FileList;

        /// <summary>
        /// The position of the backup
        /// </summary>
        public int Position;

        /// <summary>
        /// The first Log Sequence Number
        /// </summary>
        public BigInteger FirstLsn;

        /// <summary>
        /// The Log Squence Number that marks the beginning of the backup
        /// </summary>
        public BigInteger DatabaseBackupLsn;

        /// <summary>
        /// The checkpoint's Log Sequence Number
        /// </summary>
        public BigInteger CheckpointLsn;

        /// <summary>
        /// The last Log Sequence Number
        /// </summary>
        public BigInteger LastLsn;

        /// <summary>
        /// The primary version number of the Sql Server
        /// </summary>
        public int SoftwareVersionMajor;
        
        /// <summary>
        /// Was the backup performed with the CopyOnlyOption
        /// </summary>
        public Boolean IsCopyOnly;

        /// <summary>
        /// Recovery Fork backup was takeon
        /// </summary>
        public Guid LastRecoveryForkGUID;

        /// <summary>
        /// Recovery Model of the database when backup was taken
        /// </summary>
        public string RecoveryModel;
        
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\diagnosticquery\SQLServerDiagnosticQueries_2014_201807.sql

-- SQL Server 2014 Diagnostic Information Queries
-- Glenn Berry 
-- Last Modified: August 29, 2018
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/
-- http://sqlserverperformance.wordpress.com/
-- Twitter: GlennAlanBerry

-- Please listen to my Pluralsight courses
-- https://www.pluralsight.com/author/glenn-berry

-- If you want to find all of our SQLskills SQL101 blog posts, check out https://www.sqlskills.com/help/sql101/


-- Please make sure you are using the correct version of these diagnostic queries for your version of SQL Server!


-- If you like PowerShell, there is a very useful community solution for running these queries in an automated fashion
-- https://dbatools.io/

-- Invoke-DbaDiagnosticQuery
-- https://dbatools.io/functions/invoke-dbadiagnosticquery/


--******************************************************************************
--*   Copyright (C) 2018 Glenn Berry, SQLskills.com
--*   All rights reserved. 
--*
--*   For more scripts and sample code, check out 
--*      https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn
--*
--*   You may alter this code for your own *non-commercial* purposes. You may
--*   republish altered code as long as you include this copyright and give due credit. 
--*
--*
--*   THIS CODE AND INFORMATION ARE PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF 
--*   ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED 
--*   TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND/OR FITNESS FOR A
--*   PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
--*
--******************************************************************************

-- Check the major product version to see if it is SQL Server 2014 CTP2 or greater
IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * WHERE CONVERT(varchar(128), SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion')) LIKE '12%')
	BEGIN
		DECLARE @ProductVersion varchar(128) = CONVERT(varchar(128), SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion'));
		RAISERROR ('Script does not match the ProductVersion [%s] of this instance. Many of these queries may not work on this version.' , 18 , 16 , @ProductVersion);
	END
	ELSE
		PRINT N'You have the correct major version of SQL Server for this diagnostic information script';
	

-- Instance level queries *******************************

-- SQL and OS Version information for current instance  (Query 1) (Version Info)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], @@VERSION AS [SQL Server and OS Version Info];
------

-- SQL Server 2014 RTM Branch Builds						SQL Server 2014 SP1 Branch Builds						SQL Server 2014 SP2 Branch Builds					
-- Build			Description			Release Date		Build			Description		Release Date			Build			Description		Release Date		
-- 11.0.9120        CTP1				6/2/2013
-- 12.0.1524		CTP2				10/15/2013
-- 12.0.2000        RTM					4/1/2014
-- 12.0.2342        CU1                 4/21/2014
-- 12.0.2370        CU2                 6/27/2014
-- 12.0.2402		CU3					8/18/2014
-- 12.0.2430        CU4					10/21/2014
-- 12.0.2456		CU5					12/17/2014	---->	12.0.4100		SP1 RTM			5/4/2015
-- 12.0.2474		CU5 + COD HF		2/3/2015   
-- 12.0.2480		CU6					2/16/2015
-- 12.0.2495        CU7                 4/20/2015
-- 12.0.2546		CU8					6/19/2015			12.0.4416		SP1 CU1			6/19/2015
-- 12.0.2553		CU9					8/17/2015			12.0.4422		SP1 CU2			8/17/2015
-- 12.0.2556		CU10				10/19/2015          12.0.4427		SP1 CU3			10/19/2015
-- 12.0.2560		CU11				12/21/2015			12.0.4436		SP1 CU4			12/21/2015
-- 12.0.2564		CU12				2/22/2016			12.0.4439		SP1 CU5			2/22/2016
-- 12.0.2568		CU13				4/18/2016			12.0.4449		SP1 CU6			4/18/2016 (Deprecated)
--															12.0.4457		SP1 CU6 		5/30/2016 (Re-release)
-- 12.0.2569		CU14				6/20/2016			12.0.4459		SP1 CU7			6/20/2016 ----------->	12.0.5000		SP2 RTM			7/11/2016
--															12.0.4468		SP1 CU8			8/15/2016				12.0.5511		SP2 CU1			8/25/2016
--                                                          12.0.4474		SP1 CU9		    10/17/2016				12.0.5522		SP2 CU2			10/17/2016
--															12.0.4487		SP1 CU9 + HF	11/8/2016				12.0.5532		SP2 CU2 + HF    11/8/2016  https://technet.microsoft.com/library/security/MS16-136
--                                                          12.0.4491       SP1 CU10		12/28/2016				12.0.5537		SP2 CU3			12/28/2016
--															12.0.4502		SP1 CU11		2/21/2017				12.0.5540		SP2 CU4			2/21/2017
--															12.0.4511		SP1 CU12        4/17/2017				12.0.5546		SP2 CU5			4/17/2017
--															12.0.4522		SP1	CU13		7/17/2017				12.0.5552		SP2 CU6			7/17/2017
--																													12.0.5556		SP2 CU7			8/28/2017
--																													12.0.5557		SP2 CU8			10/16/2017
--																													12.0.5563		SP2 CU9			12/18/2017
--																													12.0.5571		SP2 CU10		1/16/2018
--                                                                                                                  12.0.5579		SP2 CU11		3/19/2018
--																													12.0.5589		SP2 CU12		6/18/2018
--																													12.0.5590		SP2 CU13		8/27/2018	



-- How to determine the version, edition and update level of SQL Server and its components 
-- https://bit.ly/2oAjKgW	

-- SQL Server 2014 build versions
-- https://bit.ly/2HpmYOG

-- Where to find information about the latest SQL Server builds
-- https://bit.ly/2IGHbfY

-- Recommended updates and configuration options for SQL Server 2012 and SQL Server 2014 used with high-performance workloads
-- https://bit.ly/2Hy3zIZ

-- Performance and Stability Related Fixes in Post-SQL Server 2014 RTM Builds
-- https://bit.ly/2Hx50HU

-- Performance and Stability Related Fixes in Post-SQL Server 2014 SP1 Builds
-- https://bit.ly/2GWLx6a

-- Performance and Stability Related Fixes in Post-SQL Server 2014 SP2 Builds
-- https://bit.ly/2iJ9G4N

-- Announcing updates to the SQL Server Incremental Servicing Model (ISM)
-- https://bit.ly/1RzYITz

-- Update Center for Microsoft SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2pZptuQ

-- Download SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS)
-- https://bit.ly/1OcupT9

-- Download and install Microsoft SQL Operations Studio 
-- https://bit.ly/2vgke1A


-- Get socket, physical core and logical core count from the SQL Server Error log. (Query 2) (Core Counts)
-- This query might take a few seconds depending on the size of your error log
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'detected', N'socket';
------

-- This can help you determine the exact core counts used by SQL Server and whether HT is enabled or not
-- It can also help you confirm your SQL Server licensing model
-- Be on the lookout for this message "using 40 logical processors based on SQL Server licensing" 
-- (when you have more than 40 logical cores) which means grandfathered Server/CAL licensing
-- This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was last started



-- Get selected server properties (Query 3) (Server Properties)
SELECT SERVERPROPERTY('MachineName') AS [MachineName], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ServerName') AS [ServerName],  
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceName') AS [Instance], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsClustered') AS [IsClustered], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS') AS [ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS], 
SERVERPROPERTY('Edition') AS [Edition], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductLevel') AS [ProductLevel],				-- What servicing branch (RTM/SP/CU)
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductUpdateLevel') AS [ProductUpdateLevel],	-- Within a servicing branch, what CU# is applied
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion') AS [ProductVersion],
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductMajorVersion') AS [ProductMajorVersion], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductMinorVersion') AS [ProductMinorVersion], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductBuild') AS [ProductBuild], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductBuildType') AS [ProductBuildType],		      -- Is this a GDR or OD hotfix (NULL if on a CU build)
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductUpdateReference') AS [ProductUpdateReference], -- KB article number that is applicable for this build
SERVERPROPERTY('ProcessID') AS [ProcessID],
SERVERPROPERTY('Collation') AS [Collation], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsFullTextInstalled') AS [IsFullTextInstalled], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsIntegratedSecurityOnly') AS [IsIntegratedSecurityOnly],
SERVERPROPERTY('FilestreamConfiguredLevel') AS [FilestreamConfiguredLevel],
SERVERPROPERTY('IsHadrEnabled') AS [IsHadrEnabled], 
SERVERPROPERTY('HadrManagerStatus') AS [HadrManagerStatus],
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceDefaultDataPath') AS [InstanceDefaultDataPath],
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceDefaultLogPath') AS [InstanceDefaultLogPath],
SERVERPROPERTY('BuildClrVersion') AS [Build CLR Version],
SERVERPROPERTY('IsXTPSupported') AS [IsXTPSupported];
------

-- This gives you a lot of useful information about your instance of SQL Server,
-- such as the ProcessID for SQL Server and your collation
-- Note: Some columns will be NULL on older SQL Server builds

-- SERVERPROPERTY (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2eeaXeI


-- Get instance-level configuration values for instance  (Query 4) (Configuration Values)
SELECT name, value, value_in_use, minimum, maximum, [description], is_dynamic, is_advanced
FROM sys.configurations WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Focus on these settings:
-- backup checksum default (should be 1)
-- backup compression default (should be 1 in most cases)
-- clr enabled (only enable if it is needed)
-- cost threshold for parallelism (depends on your workload)
-- lightweight pooling (should be zero)
-- max degree of parallelism (depends on your workload and hardware)
-- max server memory (MB) (set to an appropriate value, not the default)
-- optimize for ad hoc workloads (should be 1)
-- priority boost (should be zero)
-- remote admin connections (should be 1)


-- Returns a list of all global trace flags that are enabled (Query 5) (Global Trace Flags)
DBCC TRACESTATUS (-1);
------

-- If no global trace flags are enabled, no results will be returned.
-- It is very useful to know what global trace flags are currently enabled as part of the diagnostic process.

-- Common trace flags that should be enabled in most cases
-- TF 1117 - When growing a data file, grow all files at the same time so they remain the same size, reducing allocation contention points
--           https://bit.ly/2GY1kOl
-- 
-- TF 1118 - Helps alleviate allocation contention in tempdb, SQL Server allocates full extents to each database object, 
--           thereby eliminating the contention on SGAM pages (more important with older versions of SQL Server)
--           Recommendations to reduce allocation contention in SQL Server tempdb database
--           https://bit.ly/2GY1kOl

-- TF 2371 - Lowers auto update statistics threshold for large tables (on tables with more than 25,000 rows)
--           https://bit.ly/2HySkAg

-- TF 3226 - Supresses logging of successful database backup messages to the SQL Server Error Log
--           https://bit.ly/2p6MTjS

-- TF 3449 - Enables use of dirty page manager (SQL Server 2014 SP1 CU7 and later)
--			 https://bit.ly/2uj0h5M

-- TF 6533 - Spatial performance improvements in SQL Server 2012 and 2014
--           https://bit.ly/2v7C7ze

-- TF 6534 - Enables use of native code to improve performance with spatial data
--           https://bit.ly/2HrQUpU

-- TF 8079 - Enables automatic soft-NUMA on systems with eight or more physical cores per NUMA node (with SQL Server 2014 SP2)
--           https://bit.ly/29B7oR8

-- DBCC TRACEON - Trace Flags (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2FuSvPg



-- Returns status of instant file initialization (Query 6) (IFI Status)
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'Database Instant File Initialization';
------

-- Lets you determine whether Instant File Initialization (IFI) is enabled for the instance
-- This should be enabled in the vast majority of cases


-- Database Instant File Initialization
-- https://bit.ly/2nTX74y

-- Misconceptions around instant file initialization
-- https://bit.ly/2oBSKgZ



-- SQL Server Process Address space info  (Query 7) (Process Memory)
-- (shows whether locked pages is enabled, among other things)
SELECT physical_memory_in_use_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Memory Usage (MB)],
	   locked_page_allocations_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Locked Pages Allocation (MB)],
       large_page_allocations_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Large Pages Allocation (MB)], 
	   page_fault_count, memory_utilization_percentage, available_commit_limit_kb, 
	   process_physical_memory_low, process_virtual_memory_low
FROM sys.dm_os_process_memory WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You want to see 0 for process_physical_memory_low
-- You want to see 0 for process_virtual_memory_low
-- This indicates that you are not under internal memory pressure
-- If locked_page_allocations_kb > 0, then LPIM is enabled

-- How to enable the "locked pages" feature in SQL Server 2012
-- https://bit.ly/2F5UjOA

-- Memory Management Architecture Guide
-- https://bit.ly/2JKkadC 



-- SQL Server Services information (Query 8) (SQL Server Services Info)
SELECT servicename, process_id, startup_type_desc, status_desc, 
last_startup_time, service_account, is_clustered, cluster_nodename, [filename]
FROM sys.dm_server_services WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you the account being used for the SQL Server Service and the SQL Agent Service
-- Shows the process_id, when they were last started, and their current status
-- Also shows whether you are running on a failover cluster instance, and what node you are running on

-- sys.dm_server_services (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2oKa1Un


-- Last backup information by database  (Query 9) (Last Backup By Database)
SELECT ISNULL(d.[name], bs.[database_name]) AS [Database], d.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model], 
       d.log_reuse_wait_desc AS [Log Reuse Wait Desc],
    MAX(CASE WHEN [type] = 'D' THEN bs.backup_finish_date ELSE NULL END) AS [Last Full Backup],
    MAX(CASE WHEN [type] = 'I' THEN bs.backup_finish_date ELSE NULL END) AS [Last Differential Backup],
    MAX(CASE WHEN [type] = 'L' THEN bs.backup_finish_date ELSE NULL END) AS [Last Log Backup]
FROM sys.databases AS d WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.backupset AS bs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON bs.[database_name] = d.[name] 
AND bs.backup_finish_date > GETDATE()- 30
WHERE d.name <> N'tempdb'
GROUP BY ISNULL(d.[name], bs.[database_name]), d.recovery_model_desc, d.log_reuse_wait_desc, d.[name] 
ORDER BY d.recovery_model_desc, d.[name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you spot runaway transaction logs and other issues with your backup schedule


-- Get SQL Server Agent jobs and Category information (Query 10) (SQL Server Agent Jobs)
SELECT sj.name AS [Job Name], sj.[description] AS [Job Description], SUSER_SNAME(sj.owner_sid) AS [Job Owner],
sj.date_created AS [Date Created], sj.[enabled] AS [Job Enabled], 
sj.notify_email_operator_id, sj.notify_level_email, sc.name AS [CategoryName],
s.[enabled] AS [Sched Enabled], js.next_run_date, js.next_run_time
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobs AS sj WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.syscategories AS sc WITH (NOLOCK)
ON sj.category_id = sc.category_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobschedules AS js WITH (NOLOCK)
ON sj.job_id = js.job_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysschedules AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON js.schedule_id = s.schedule_id
ORDER BY sj.name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some basic information about your SQL Server Agent jobs, who owns them and how they are configured
-- Look for Agent jobs that are not owned by sa
-- Look for jobs that have a notify_email_operator_id set to 0 (meaning no operator)
-- Look for jobs that have a notify_level_email set to 0 (meaning no e-mail is ever sent)
--
-- MSDN sysjobs documentation
-- https://bit.ly/2paDEOP 

-- SQL Server Maintenance Solution
-- https://bit.ly/1pgchQu  


-- Get SQL Server Agent Alert Information (Query 11) (SQL Server Agent Alerts)
SELECT name, event_source, message_id, severity, [enabled], has_notification, 
       delay_between_responses, occurrence_count, last_occurrence_date, last_occurrence_time
FROM msdb.dbo.sysalerts WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some basic information about your SQL Server Agent Alerts 
-- (which are different from SQL Server Agent jobs)
-- Read more about Agent Alerts here: https://bit.ly/2Giz0Xf 



-- Windows information (Query 12) (Windows Info)
SELECT windows_release, windows_service_pack_level, 
       windows_sku, os_language_version
FROM sys.dm_os_windows_info WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you major OS version, Service Pack, Edition, and language info for the operating system
-- 10.0 is either Windows 10 or Windows Server 2016
-- 6.3 is either Windows 8.1, or Windows Server 2012 R2  
-- 6.2 is either Windows 8 or Windows Server 2012
-- 6.1 is either Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2
-- 6.0 is either Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008

-- Windows SKU codes
-- 4 is Enterprise Edition
-- 7 is Standard Server Edition
-- 8 is Datacenter Server Edition
-- 10 is Enterprise Server Edition
-- 48 is Professional Edition
-- 161 is Pro for Workstations

-- 1033 for os_language_version is US-English

-- SQL Server 2014 requires Windows Server 2008 SP2 or newer

-- Hardware and Software Requirements for Installing SQL Server 2014
-- https://bit.ly/1yRYXkQ

-- Using SQL Server in Windows 8 and later versions of Windows operating system 
-- https://bit.ly/2F7Ax0P



-- SQL Server NUMA Node information  (Query 13) (SQL Server NUMA Info)
SELECT node_id, node_state_desc, memory_node_id, processor_group, online_scheduler_count, 
       idle_scheduler_count, active_worker_count, avg_load_balance, resource_monitor_state
FROM sys.dm_os_nodes WITH (NOLOCK) 
WHERE node_state_desc <> N'ONLINE DAC' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some useful information about the composition and relative load on your NUMA nodes
-- You want to see an equal number of schedulers on each NUMA node
-- Watch out if SQL Server 2014 Standard Edition has been installed 
-- on a physical or virtual machine with more than four sockets or more than 16 physical cores

-- sys.dm_os_nodes (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pn5Mw8

-- Balancing Your Available SQL Server Core Licenses Evenly Across NUMA Nodes
-- https://bit.ly/2vfC4Rq



-- Good basic information about OS memory amounts and state  (Query 14) (System Memory)
SELECT total_physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Physical Memory (MB)], 
       available_physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Available Memory (MB)], 
       total_page_file_kb/1024 AS [Total Page File (MB)], 
	   available_page_file_kb/1024 AS [Available Page File (MB)], 
	   system_cache_kb/1024 AS [System Cache (MB)],
       system_memory_state_desc AS [System Memory State]
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_memory WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You want to see "Available physical memory is high" for System Memory State
-- This indicates that you are not under external memory pressure

-- Possible System Memory State values:
-- Available physical memory is high
-- Physical memory usage is steady
-- Available physical memory is low
-- Available physical memory is running low
-- Physical memory state is transitioning

-- sys.dm_os_sys_memory (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pcV0xq



-- You can skip the next two queries if you know you don't have a clustered instance


-- Get information about your cluster nodes and their status  (Query 15) (Cluster Node Properties)
-- (if your database server is in a failover cluster)
SELECT NodeName, status_description, is_current_owner
FROM sys.dm_os_cluster_nodes WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Knowing which node owns the cluster resources is critical
-- Especially when you are installing Windows or SQL Server updates
-- You will see no results if your instance is not clustered

-- Recommended hotfixes and updates for Windows Server 2012 R2-based failover clusters
-- https://bit.ly/1z5BfCw


-- Get information about any AlwaysOn AG cluster this instance is a part of (Query 16) (AlwaysOn AG Cluster)
SELECT cluster_name, quorum_type_desc, quorum_state_desc
FROM sys.dm_hadr_cluster WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You will see no results if your instance is not using AlwaysOn AGs


-- Good overview of AG health and status (Query 17) (AlwaysOn AG Status)
SELECT ag.name AS [AG Name], ar.replica_server_name, ar.availability_mode_desc, adc.[database_name], 
       drs.is_local, drs.is_primary_replica, drs.synchronization_state_desc, drs.is_commit_participant, 
	   drs.synchronization_health_desc, drs.recovery_lsn, drs.truncation_lsn, drs.last_sent_lsn, 
	   drs.last_sent_time, drs.last_received_lsn, drs.last_received_time, drs.last_hardened_lsn, 
	   drs.last_hardened_time, drs.last_redone_lsn, drs.last_redone_time, drs.log_send_queue_size, 
	   drs.log_send_rate, drs.redo_queue_size, drs.redo_rate, drs.filestream_send_rate, 
	   drs.end_of_log_lsn, drs.last_commit_lsn, drs.last_commit_time, drs.database_state_desc 
FROM sys.dm_hadr_database_replica_states AS drs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.availability_databases_cluster AS adc WITH (NOLOCK)
ON drs.group_id = adc.group_id 
AND drs.group_database_id = adc.group_database_id
INNER JOIN sys.availability_groups AS ag WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ag.group_id = drs.group_id
INNER JOIN sys.availability_replicas AS ar WITH (NOLOCK)
ON drs.group_id = ar.group_id 
AND drs.replica_id = ar.replica_id
ORDER BY ag.name, ar.replica_server_name, adc.[database_name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);

-- You will see no results if your instance is not using AlwaysOn AGs


-- Hardware information from SQL Server 2014  (Query 18) (Hardware Info)
SELECT cpu_count AS [Logical CPU Count], scheduler_count, 
       hyperthread_ratio AS [Hyperthread Ratio],
       cpu_count/hyperthread_ratio AS [Physical CPU Count], 
       physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Physical Memory (MB)], 
	   committed_kb/1024 AS [Committed Memory (MB)],
       committed_target_kb/1024 AS [Committed Target Memory (MB)],
       max_workers_count AS [Max Workers Count], 
	   affinity_type_desc AS [Affinity Type], 
       sqlserver_start_time AS [SQL Server Start Time], 
	   virtual_machine_type_desc AS [Virtual Machine Type]
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some good basic hardware information about your database server
-- Cannot distinguish between HT and multi-core
-- Note: virtual_machine_type_desc of HYPERVISOR does not automatically mean you are running SQL Server inside of a VM
-- It merely indicates that you have a hypervisor running on your host

-- sys.dm_os_sys_info (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pczOYs

-- Soft NUMA configuration was a new column for SQL Server 2016
-- OFF = Soft-NUMA feature is OFF
-- ON = SQL Server automatically determines the NUMA node sizes for Soft-NUMA
-- MANUAL = Manually configured soft-NUMA

-- Configure SQL Server to Use Soft-NUMA (SQL Server)
-- https://bit.ly/2HTpKJt



-- Get System Manufacturer and model number from SQL Server Error log (Query 19) (System Manufacturer)
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'Manufacturer';
------ 

-- This can help you determine the capabilities and capacities of your database server
-- Can also be used to confirm if you are running in a VM
-- This query might take a few seconds if you have not recycled your error log recently
-- This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was started


-- Get BIOS date from Windows Registry (Query 20) (BIOS Date)
EXEC sys.xp_instance_regread N'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE', N'HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\BIOS', N'BiosReleaseDate';
------

-- Helps you understand whether the main system BIOS is up to date, and the possible age of the hardware
-- Not as useful for virtualization


-- Get processor description from Windows Registry  (Query 21) (Processor Description)
EXEC sys.xp_instance_regread N'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE', N'HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\CentralProcessor\0', N'ProcessorNameString';
------

-- Gives you the model number and rated clock speed of your processor(s)
-- Your processors may be running at less than the rated clock speed due
-- to the Windows Power Plan or hardware power management

-- You can use CPU-Z to get your actual CPU core speed and a lot of other useful information
-- https://bit.ly/QhR6xF

-- You can learn more about processor selection for SQL Server by following this link
-- https://bit.ly/2F3aVlP



-- See if buffer pool extension (BPE) is enabled (Query 22) (BPE Configuration)
SELECT [path], state_description, current_size_in_kb, 
CAST(current_size_in_kb/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10,2)) AS [Size (GB)]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_pool_extension_configuration WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- BPE is available in both Standard Edition and Enterprise Edition
-- It is a more interesting feature for Standard Edition

-- Buffer Pool Extension to SSDs in SQL Server 2014
-- https://bit.ly/1bm08m8

-- Buffer Pool Extension
-- https://bit.ly/2oBuieO



-- Look at buffer descriptors to see BPE usage by database (Query 23) (BPE Usage) 
SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name], COUNT(page_id) AS [Page Count],
CAST(COUNT(*)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Buffer size(MB)], 
AVG(read_microsec) AS [Avg Read Time (microseconds)]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE database_id <> 32767
AND is_in_bpool_extension = 1
GROUP BY DB_NAME(database_id) 
ORDER BY [Buffer size(MB)] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You will see no results if BPE is not enabled or if there is no BPE usage


-- Get information on location, time and size of any memory dumps from SQL Server  (Query 24) (Memory Dump Info)
SELECT [filename], creation_time, size_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS [Size (MB)]
FROM sys.dm_server_memory_dumps WITH (NOLOCK) 
ORDER BY creation_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This will not return any rows if you have 
-- not had any memory dumps (which is a good thing)

-- sys.dm_server_memory_dumps (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2elwWll



-- Look at Suspect Pages table (Query 25) (Suspect Pages)
SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name], [file_id], page_id, 
       event_type, error_count, last_update_date 
FROM msdb.dbo.suspect_pages WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY database_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- event_type value descriptions
-- 1 = 823 error caused by an operating system CRC error
--     or 824 error other than a bad checksum or a torn page (for example, a bad page ID)
-- 2 = Bad checksum
-- 3 = Torn page
-- 4 = Restored (The page was restored after it was marked bad)
-- 5 = Repaired (DBCC repaired the page)
-- 7 = Deallocated by DBCC

-- Ideally, this query returns no results. The table is limited to 1000 rows.
-- If you do get results here, you should do further investigation to determine the root cause

-- Manage the suspect_pages Table
-- https://bit.ly/2Fvr1c9


-- Get number of data files in tempdb database (Query 26) (Tempdb Data Files)
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'The tempdb database has';
------

-- Get the number of data files in the tempdb database
-- 4-8 data files that are all the same size is a good starting point
-- This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was last started
-- This will be blank unless you have Service Pack 2 or later


-- File names and paths for all user and system databases on instance  (Query 27) (Database Filenames and Paths)
SELECT DB_NAME([database_id]) AS [Database Name], 
       [file_id], [name], physical_name, [type_desc], state_desc,
	   is_percent_growth, growth,
	   CONVERT(bigint, growth/128.0) AS [Growth in MB], 
       CONVERT(bigint, size/128.0) AS [Total Size in MB]
FROM sys.master_files WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY DB_NAME([database_id]), [file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Things to look at:
-- Are data files and log files on different drives?
-- Is everything on the C: drive?
-- Is tempdb on dedicated drives?
-- Is there only one tempdb data file?
-- Are all of the tempdb data files the same size?
-- Are there multiple data files for user databases?
-- Is percent growth enabled for any files (which is bad)?


-- Volume info for all LUNS that have database files on the current instance (Query 28) (Volume Info)
SELECT DISTINCT vs.volume_mount_point, vs.file_system_type, vs.logical_volume_name, 
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.total_bytes/1073741824.0) AS [Total Size (GB)],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.available_bytes/1073741824.0) AS [Available Size (GB)],  
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.available_bytes * 1. / vs.total_bytes * 100.) AS [Space Free %],
vs.supports_compression, vs.is_compressed, 
vs.supports_sparse_files, vs.supports_alternate_streams
FROM sys.master_files AS f WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_os_volume_stats(f.database_id, f.[file_id]) AS vs 
ORDER BY vs.volume_mount_point OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Shows you the total and free space on the LUNs where you have database files
-- Being low on free space can negatively affect performance

-- sys.dm_os_volume_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2oBPNNr



-- Drive level latency information (Query 29) (Drive Level Latency)
-- Based on code from Jimmy May
SELECT tab.[Drive], tab.volume_mount_point AS [Volume Mount Point], 
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_reads = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall_read_ms/num_of_reads) 
	END AS [Read Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_writes = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall_write_ms/num_of_writes) 
	END AS [Write Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN (num_of_reads = 0 AND num_of_writes = 0) THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall/(num_of_reads + num_of_writes)) 
	END AS [Overall Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_reads = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (num_of_bytes_read/num_of_reads) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Read],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_writes = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (num_of_bytes_written/num_of_writes) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Write],
	CASE 
		WHEN (num_of_reads = 0 AND num_of_writes = 0) THEN 0 
		ELSE ((num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/(num_of_reads + num_of_writes)) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Transfer]
FROM (SELECT LEFT(UPPER(mf.physical_name), 2) AS Drive, SUM(num_of_reads) AS num_of_reads,
	         SUM(io_stall_read_ms) AS io_stall_read_ms, SUM(num_of_writes) AS num_of_writes,
	         SUM(io_stall_write_ms) AS io_stall_write_ms, SUM(num_of_bytes_read) AS num_of_bytes_read,
	         SUM(num_of_bytes_written) AS num_of_bytes_written, SUM(io_stall) AS io_stall, vs.volume_mount_point 
      FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS vfs
      INNER JOIN sys.master_files AS mf WITH (NOLOCK)
      ON vfs.database_id = mf.database_id AND vfs.file_id = mf.file_id
	  CROSS APPLY sys.dm_os_volume_stats(mf.database_id, mf.[file_id]) AS vs 
      GROUP BY LEFT(UPPER(mf.physical_name), 2), vs.volume_mount_point) AS tab
ORDER BY [Overall Latency] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Shows you the drive-level latency for reads and writes, in milliseconds
-- Latency above 30-40ms is usually a problem
-- These latency numbers include all file activity against all SQL Server 
-- database files on each drive since SQL Server was last started


-- Calculates average stalls per read, per write, and per total input/output for each database file  (Query 30) (IO Stalls by File)
SELECT DB_NAME(fs.database_id) AS [Database Name], CAST(fs.io_stall_read_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_read_stall_ms],
CAST(fs.io_stall_write_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_write_stall_ms],
CAST((fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms)/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_io_stall_ms],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), mf.size/128.0) AS [File Size (MB)], mf.physical_name, mf.type_desc, fs.io_stall_read_ms, fs.num_of_reads, 
fs.io_stall_write_ms, fs.num_of_writes, fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms AS [io_stalls], fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes AS [total_io],
io_stall_queued_read_ms AS [Resource Governor Total Read IO Latency (ms)], io_stall_queued_write_ms AS [Resource Governor Total Write IO Latency (ms)] 
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(null,null) AS fs
INNER JOIN sys.master_files AS mf WITH (NOLOCK)
ON fs.database_id = mf.database_id
AND fs.[file_id] = mf.[file_id]
ORDER BY avg_io_stall_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database files on the entire instance have the most I/O bottlenecks
-- This can help you decide whether certain LUNs are overloaded and whether you might
-- want to move some files to a different location or perhaps improve your I/O performance
-- These latency numbers include all file activity against each SQL Server 
-- database file since SQL Server was last started


-- Look for I/O requests taking longer than 15 seconds in the six most recent SQL Server Error Logs (Query 31) (IO Warnings)
CREATE TABLE #IOWarningResults(LogDate datetime, ProcessInfo sysname, LogText nvarchar(1000));

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 1, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 2, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 3, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 4, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 5, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

SELECT LogDate, ProcessInfo, LogText
FROM #IOWarningResults
ORDER BY LogDate DESC;

DROP TABLE #IOWarningResults;
------  

-- Finding 15 second I/O warnings in the SQL Server Error Log is useful evidence of
-- poor I/O performance (which might have many different causes)
-- Look to see if you see any patterns in the results (same files, same drives, same time of day, etc.)

-- Diagnostics in SQL Server help detect stalled and stuck I/O operations
-- https://bit.ly/2qtaw73



-- Recovery model, log reuse wait description, log file size, log usage size  (Query 32) (Database Properties)
-- and compatibility level for all databases on instance
SELECT db.[name] AS [Database Name], SUSER_SNAME(db.owner_sid) AS [Database Owner], db.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model], 
db.state_desc, db.containment_desc, db.log_reuse_wait_desc AS [Log Reuse Wait Description], 
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), ls.cntr_value/1024.0) AS [Log Size (MB)], CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), lu.cntr_value/1024.0) AS [Log Used (MB)],
CAST(CAST(lu.cntr_value AS FLOAT) / CAST(ls.cntr_value AS FLOAT)AS DECIMAL(18,2)) * 100 AS [Log Used %], 
db.[compatibility_level] AS [DB Compatibility Level], db.page_verify_option_desc AS [Page Verify Option], 
db.is_auto_create_stats_on, db.is_auto_update_stats_on, db.is_auto_update_stats_async_on, db.is_parameterization_forced, 
db.snapshot_isolation_state_desc, db.is_read_committed_snapshot_on, db.is_auto_close_on, db.is_auto_shrink_on, 
db.target_recovery_time_in_seconds, db.is_cdc_enabled, db.is_published, db.is_distributor, db.is_encrypted,
db.group_database_id, db.replica_id,db.is_memory_optimized_elevate_to_snapshot_on, 
db.delayed_durability_desc, db.is_auto_create_stats_incremental_on,
db.is_encrypted, de.encryption_state, de.percent_complete, de.key_algorithm, de.key_length      
FROM sys.databases AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS lu WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.name = lu.instance_name
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS ls WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.name = ls.instance_name
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_database_encryption_keys AS de WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.database_id = de.database_id
WHERE lu.counter_name LIKE N'Log File(s) Used Size (KB)%' 
AND ls.counter_name LIKE N'Log File(s) Size (KB)%'
AND ls.cntr_value > 0 
ORDER BY db.[name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Things to look at:
-- How many databases are on the instance?
-- What recovery models are they using?
-- What is the log reuse wait description?
-- How full are the transaction logs?
-- What compatibility level are the databases on? 
-- What is the Page Verify Option? (should be CHECKSUM)
-- Is Auto Update Statistics Asynchronously enabled?
-- Make sure auto_shrink and auto_close are not enabled!

 

-- Missing Indexes for all databases by Index Advantage  (Query 33) (Missing Indexes All Databases)
SELECT CONVERT(decimal(18,2), user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01)) AS [index_advantage],
FORMAT(migs.last_user_seek, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss') AS [last_user_seek], 
mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement]) AS [missing_indexes_for_table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement], equality_columns) AS [similar_missing_indexes_for_table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, 
CONVERT(decimal(18,2), migs.avg_total_user_cost) AS [avg_total_user_cost], migs.avg_user_impact 
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Getting missing index information for all of the databases on the instance is very useful
-- Look at last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
-- Also look at avg_user_impact and avg_total_user_cost to help determine importance
-- SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware
-- Do not just blindly add indexes that show up from this query!!!

-- SQL Server Index Design Guide
-- https://bit.ly/2qtZr4N



-- Get VLF Counts for all databases on the instance (Query 34) (VLF Counts)
-- (adapted from Michelle Ufford) 
CREATE TABLE #VLFInfo (RecoveryUnitID int, FileID  int,
					   FileSize bigint, StartOffset bigint,
					   FSeqNo      bigint, [Status]    bigint,
					   Parity      bigint, CreateLSN   numeric(38));
	 
CREATE TABLE #VLFCountResults(DatabaseName sysname, VLFCount int);
	 
EXEC sp_MSforeachdb N'Use [?]; 

				INSERT INTO #VLFInfo 
				EXEC sp_executesql N''DBCC LOGINFO([?])''; 
	 
				INSERT INTO #VLFCountResults 
				SELECT DB_NAME(), COUNT(*) 
				FROM #VLFInfo; 

				TRUNCATE TABLE #VLFInfo;'
	 
SELECT DatabaseName, VLFCount  
FROM #VLFCountResults
ORDER BY VLFCount DESC;
	 
DROP TABLE #VLFInfo;
DROP TABLE #VLFCountResults;
------

-- High VLF counts can affect write performance to the log file 
-- and they can make full database restores and crash recovery take much longer
-- Try to keep your VLF counts under 200 in most cases (depending on log file size)

-- Important change to VLF creation algorithm in SQL Server 2014
-- https://bit.ly/2Hsjbg4

-- SQL Server Transaction Log Architecture and Management Guide
-- https://bit.ly/2JjmQRZ



-- Get CPU utilization by database (Query 35) (CPU Usage by Database)
WITH DB_CPU_Stats
AS
(SELECT pa.DatabaseID, DB_Name(pa.DatabaseID) AS [Database Name], SUM(qs.total_worker_time/1000) AS [CPU_Time_Ms]
 FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
 CROSS APPLY (SELECT CONVERT(int, value) AS [DatabaseID] 
              FROM sys.dm_exec_plan_attributes(qs.plan_handle)
              WHERE attribute = N'dbid') AS pa
 GROUP BY DatabaseID)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY [CPU_Time_Ms] DESC) AS [CPU Rank],
       [Database Name], [CPU_Time_Ms] AS [CPU Time (ms)], 
       CAST([CPU_Time_Ms] * 1.0 / SUM([CPU_Time_Ms]) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5, 2)) AS [CPU Percent]
FROM DB_CPU_Stats
WHERE DatabaseID <> 32767 -- ResourceDB
ORDER BY [CPU Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database is using the most CPU resources on the instance


-- Get I/O utilization by database (Query 36) (IO Usage By Database)
WITH Aggregate_IO_Statistics
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(SUM(num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/1048576 AS DECIMAL(12, 2)) AS io_in_mb
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS [DM_IO_STATS]
GROUP BY database_id)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY io_in_mb DESC) AS [I/O Rank], [Database Name], io_in_mb AS [Total I/O (MB)],
       CAST(io_in_mb/ SUM(io_in_mb) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [I/O Percent]
FROM Aggregate_IO_Statistics
ORDER BY [I/O Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database is using the most I/O resources on the instance


-- Get total buffer usage by database for current instance  (Query 37) (Total Buffer Usage by Database)
-- This make take some time to run on a busy instance
WITH AggregateBufferPoolUsage
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(COUNT(*) * 8/1024.0 AS DECIMAL (10,2))  AS [CachedSize]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE database_id <> 32767 -- ResourceDB
GROUP BY DB_NAME(database_id))
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY CachedSize DESC) AS [Buffer Pool Rank], [Database Name], CachedSize AS [Cached Size (MB)],
       CAST(CachedSize / SUM(CachedSize) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [Buffer Pool Percent]
FROM AggregateBufferPoolUsage
ORDER BY [Buffer Pool Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you how much memory (in the buffer pool) 
-- is being used by each database on the instance


-- Clear Wait Stats with this command
-- DBCC SQLPERF('sys.dm_os_wait_stats', CLEAR);

-- Isolate top waits for server instance since last restart or wait statistics clear  (Query 38) (Top Waits)
WITH [Waits] 
AS (SELECT wait_type, wait_time_ms/ 1000.0 AS [WaitS],
          (wait_time_ms - signal_wait_time_ms) / 1000.0 AS [ResourceS],
           signal_wait_time_ms / 1000.0 AS [SignalS],
           waiting_tasks_count AS [WaitCount],
           100.0 *  wait_time_ms / SUM (wait_time_ms) OVER() AS [Percentage],
           ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY wait_time_ms DESC) AS [RowNum]
    FROM sys.dm_os_wait_stats WITH (NOLOCK)
    WHERE [wait_type] NOT IN (
        N'BROKER_EVENTHANDLER', N'BROKER_RECEIVE_WAITFOR', N'BROKER_TASK_STOP',
		N'BROKER_TO_FLUSH', N'BROKER_TRANSMITTER', N'CHECKPOINT_QUEUE',
        N'CHKPT', N'CLR_AUTO_EVENT', N'CLR_MANUAL_EVENT', N'CLR_SEMAPHORE',
        N'DBMIRROR_DBM_EVENT', N'DBMIRROR_EVENTS_QUEUE', N'DBMIRROR_WORKER_QUEUE',
		N'DBMIRRORING_CMD', N'DIRTY_PAGE_POLL', N'DISPATCHER_QUEUE_SEMAPHORE',
        N'EXECSYNC', N'FSAGENT', N'FT_IFTS_SCHEDULER_IDLE_WAIT', N'FT_IFTSHC_MUTEX',
        N'HADR_CLUSAPI_CALL', N'HADR_FILESTREAM_IOMGR_IOCOMPLETION', N'HADR_LOGCAPTURE_WAIT', 
		N'HADR_NOTIFICATION_DEQUEUE', N'HADR_TIMER_TASK', N'HADR_WORK_QUEUE',
        N'KSOURCE_WAKEUP', N'LAZYWRITER_SLEEP', N'LOGMGR_QUEUE', N'ONDEMAND_TASK_QUEUE',
        N'PWAIT_ALL_COMPONENTS_INITIALIZED', 
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_AUTHENTICATIONOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_CREATEFILE', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_GENERICOPS',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_LIBRARYOPS', N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_QUERYREGISTRY',
		N'PREEMPTIVE_HADR_LEASE_MECHANISM', N'PREEMPTIVE_SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS',
		N'QDS_PERSIST_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP',
        N'QDS_CLEANUP_STALE_QUERIES_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP', N'QDS_SHUTDOWN_QUEUE', N'REQUEST_FOR_DEADLOCK_SEARCH',
		N'RESOURCE_QUEUE', N'SERVER_IDLE_CHECK', N'SLEEP_BPOOL_FLUSH', N'SLEEP_DBSTARTUP',
		N'SLEEP_DCOMSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_MASTERDBREADY', N'SLEEP_MASTERMDREADY',
        N'SLEEP_MASTERUPGRADED', N'SLEEP_MSDBSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_SYSTEMTASK', N'SLEEP_TASK',
        N'SLEEP_TEMPDBSTARTUP', N'SNI_HTTP_ACCEPT', N'SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS_SLEEP',
		N'SQLTRACE_BUFFER_FLUSH', N'SQLTRACE_INCREMENTAL_FLUSH_SLEEP', N'SQLTRACE_WAIT_ENTRIES',
		N'WAIT_FOR_RESULTS', N'WAITFOR', N'WAITFOR_TASKSHUTDOWN', N'WAIT_XTP_HOST_WAIT',
		N'WAIT_XTP_OFFLINE_CKPT_NEW_LOG', N'WAIT_XTP_CKPT_CLOSE', N'XE_DISPATCHER_JOIN',
        N'XE_DISPATCHER_WAIT', N'XE_TIMER_EVENT')
    AND waiting_tasks_count > 0)
SELECT
    MAX (W1.wait_type) AS [WaitType],
	CAST (MAX (W1.Percentage) AS DECIMAL (5,2)) AS [Wait Percentage],
	CAST ((MAX (W1.WaitS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgWait_Sec],
    CAST ((MAX (W1.ResourceS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgRes_Sec],
    CAST ((MAX (W1.SignalS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgSig_Sec], 
    CAST (MAX (W1.WaitS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Wait_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.ResourceS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Resource_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.SignalS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Signal_Sec],
    MAX (W1.WaitCount) AS [Wait Count],
	CAST (N'https://www.sqlskills.com/help/waits/' + W1.wait_type AS XML) AS [Help/Info URL]
FROM Waits AS W1
INNER JOIN Waits AS W2
ON W2.RowNum <= W1.RowNum
GROUP BY W1.RowNum, W1.wait_type
HAVING SUM (W2.Percentage) - MAX (W1.Percentage) < 99 -- percentage threshold
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Cumulative wait stats are not as useful on an idle instance that is not under load or performance pressure

-- SQL Server Wait Types Library (Paul Randal)
-- https://bit.ly/2ePzYO2

-- The SQL Server Wait Type Repository
-- https://bit.ly/1afzfjC

-- Wait statistics, or please tell me where it hurts
-- https://bit.ly/2wsQHQE

-- SQL Server 2005 Performance Tuning using the Waits and Queues
-- https://bit.ly/1o2NFoF

-- sys.dm_os_wait_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2Hjq9Yl



-- Get a count of SQL connections by IP address (Query 39) (Connection Counts by IP Address)
SELECT ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name, 
COUNT(ec.session_id) AS [connection count] 
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions AS es WITH (NOLOCK) 
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_connections AS ec WITH (NOLOCK) 
ON es.session_id = ec.session_id 
GROUP BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name  
ORDER BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you figure where your database load is coming from
-- and verifies connectivity from other machines

-- Solving Connectivity errors to SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2EgzoD0



-- Get Average Task Counts (run multiple times)  (Query 40) (Avg Task Counts)
SELECT AVG(current_tasks_count) AS [Avg Task Count], 
AVG(work_queue_count) AS [Avg Work Queue Count],
AVG(runnable_tasks_count) AS [Avg Runnable Task Count],
AVG(pending_disk_io_count) AS [Avg Pending DiskIO Count]
FROM sys.dm_os_schedulers WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE scheduler_id < 255 OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Sustained values above 10 suggest further investigation in that area
-- High Avg Task Counts are often caused by blocking/deadlocking or other resource contention

-- Sustained values above 1 suggest further investigation in that area
-- High Avg Runnable Task Counts are a good sign of CPU pressure
-- High Avg Pending DiskIO Counts are a sign of disk pressure

-- How to Do Some Very Basic SQL Server Monitoring
-- https://bit.ly/2q3Btgt



-- Detect blocking (run multiple times)  (Query 41) (Detect Blocking)
SELECT t1.resource_type AS [lock type], DB_NAME(resource_database_id) AS [database],
t1.resource_associated_entity_id AS [blk object],t1.request_mode AS [lock req],  -- lock requested
t1.request_session_id AS [waiter sid], t2.wait_duration_ms AS [wait time],       -- spid of waiter  
(SELECT [text] FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r WITH (NOLOCK)                      -- get sql for waiter
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.[sql_handle]) 
WHERE r.session_id = t1.request_session_id) AS [waiter_batch],
(SELECT SUBSTRING(qt.[text],r.statement_start_offset/2, 
    (CASE WHEN r.statement_end_offset = -1 
    THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 
    ELSE r.statement_end_offset END - r.statement_start_offset)/2) 
FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.[sql_handle]) AS qt
WHERE r.session_id = t1.request_session_id) AS [waiter_stmt],					-- statement blocked
t2.blocking_session_id AS [blocker sid],										-- spid of blocker
(SELECT [text] FROM sys.sysprocesses AS p										-- get sql for blocker
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(p.[sql_handle]) 
WHERE p.spid = t2.blocking_session_id) AS [blocker_batch]
FROM sys.dm_tran_locks AS t1 WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_waiting_tasks AS t2 WITH (NOLOCK)
ON t1.lock_owner_address = t2.resource_address OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps troubleshoot blocking and deadlocking issues
-- The results will change from second to second on a busy system
-- You should run this query multiple times when you see signs of blocking



-- Get CPU Utilization History for last 256 minutes (in one minute intervals)  (Query 42) (CPU Utilization History)
DECLARE @ts_now bigint = (SELECT cpu_ticks/(cpu_ticks/ms_ticks) FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info WITH (NOLOCK)); 

SELECT TOP(256) SQLProcessUtilization AS [SQL Server Process CPU Utilization], 
               SystemIdle AS [System Idle Process], 
               100 - SystemIdle - SQLProcessUtilization AS [Other Process CPU Utilization], 
               DATEADD(ms, -1 * (@ts_now - [timestamp]), GETDATE()) AS [Event Time] 
FROM (SELECT record.value('(./Record/@id)[1]', 'int') AS record_id, 
			record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/SystemIdle)[1]', 'int') 
			AS [SystemIdle], 
			record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/ProcessUtilization)[1]', 'int') 
			AS [SQLProcessUtilization], [timestamp] 
	  FROM (SELECT [timestamp], CONVERT(xml, record) AS [record] 
			FROM sys.dm_os_ring_buffers WITH (NOLOCK)
			WHERE ring_buffer_type = N'RING_BUFFER_SCHEDULER_MONITOR' 
			AND record LIKE N'%<SystemHealth>%') AS x) AS y 
ORDER BY record_id DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at the trend over the entire period 
-- Also look at high sustained 'Other Process' CPU Utilization values
-- Note: This query sometimes gives inaccurate results (negative values)
-- on high core count (> 64 cores) systems


-- Get top total worker time queries for entire instance (Query 43) (Top Worker Time Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], 
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 255), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text],  
qs.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time], qs.min_worker_time AS [Min Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.max_worker_time AS [Max Worker Time], 
qs.min_elapsed_time AS [Min Elapsed Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time AS [Max Elapsed Time],
qs.min_logical_reads AS [Min Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.max_logical_reads AS [Max Logical Reads], 
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Helps you find the most expensive queries from a CPU perspective across the entire instance
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues



-- Page Life Expectancy (PLE) value for each NUMA node in current instance  (Query 44) (PLE by NUMA Node)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], RTRIM([object_name]) AS [Object Name], instance_name, cntr_value AS [Page Life Expectancy]
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N'%Buffer Node%' -- Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N'Page life expectancy' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- PLE is a good measurement of internal memory pressure
-- Higher PLE is better. Watch the trend over time, not the absolute value
-- This will only return one row for non-NUMA systems

-- Page Life Expectancy isn�t what you think�
-- https://bit.ly/2EgynLa


-- Memory Grants Pending value for current instance  (Query 45) (Memory Grants Pending)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], RTRIM([object_name]) AS [Object Name], cntr_value AS [Memory Grants Pending]                                                                                                       
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N'%Memory Manager%' -- Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N'Memory Grants Pending' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Run multiple times, and run periodically if you suspect you are under memory pressure
-- Memory Grants Pending above zero for a sustained period is a very strong indicator of internal memory pressure


-- Memory Clerk Usage for instance  (Query 46) (Memory Clerk Usage)
-- Look for high value for CACHESTORE_SQLCP (Ad-hoc query plans)
SELECT TOP(10) mc.[type] AS [Memory Clerk Type], 
       CAST((SUM(mc.pages_kb)/1024.0) AS DECIMAL (15,2)) AS [Memory Usage (MB)] 
FROM sys.dm_os_memory_clerks AS mc WITH (NOLOCK)
GROUP BY mc.[type]  
ORDER BY SUM(mc.pages_kb) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- MEMORYCLERK_SQLBUFFERPOOL was new for SQL Server 2012. It should be your highest consumer of memory

-- CACHESTORE_SQLCP  SQL Plans         
-- These are cached SQL statements or batches that aren't in stored procedures, functions and triggers
-- Watch out for high values for CACHESTORE_SQLCP
-- Enabling 'optimize for ad hoc workloads' at the instance level can help reduce this
-- Running DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE ('SQL Plans') periodically may be required to better control this

-- CACHESTORE_OBJCP  Object Plans      
-- These are compiled plans for stored procedures, functions and triggers



-- Find single-use, ad-hoc and prepared queries that are bloating the plan cache  (Query 47) (Ad hoc Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], t.[text] AS [Query Text], 
cp.objtype AS [Object Type], cp.cacheobjtype AS [Cache Object Type],  
cp.size_in_bytes/1024 AS [Plan Size in KB]
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t
WHERE cp.cacheobjtype = N'Compiled Plan' 
AND cp.objtype IN (N'Adhoc', N'Prepared') 
AND cp.usecounts = 1
ORDER BY cp.size_in_bytes DESC, DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you the text, type and size of single-use ad-hoc and prepared queries that waste space in the plan cache
-- Enabling 'optimize for ad hoc workloads' for the instance can help (SQL Server 2008 and above only)
-- Running DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE ('SQL Plans') periodically may be required to better control this
-- Enabling forced parameterization for the database can help, but test first!

-- Plan cache, adhoc workloads and clearing the single-use plan cache bloat
-- https://bit.ly/2EfYOkl


-- Get top total logical reads queries for entire instance (Query 48) (Top Logical Reads Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name],
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 255), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text], 
qs.total_logical_reads AS [Total Logical Reads],
qs.min_logical_reads AS [Min Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.max_logical_reads AS [Max Logical Reads],   
qs.min_worker_time AS [Min Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.max_worker_time AS [Max Worker Time], 
qs.min_elapsed_time AS [Min Elapsed Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time AS [Max Elapsed Time],
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count], 
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Helps you find the most expensive queries from a memory perspective across the entire instance
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues


-- Get top average elapsed time queries for entire instance (Query 49) (Top Avg Elapsed Time Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], 
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 255), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text],  
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
qs.min_elapsed_time, qs.max_elapsed_time, qs.last_elapsed_time,
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],  
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads], 
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Physical Reads], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you find the highest average elapsed time queries across the entire instance
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues




-- Database specific queries *****************************************************************

-- **** Please switch to a user database that you are interested in! *****
--USE YourDatabaseName; -- make sure to change to an actual database on your instance, not the master system database
--GO

-- Individual File Sizes and space available for current database  (Query 50) (File Sizes and Space)
SELECT f.name AS [File Name] , f.physical_name AS [Physical Name], 
CAST((f.size/128.0) AS DECIMAL(15,2)) AS [Total Size in MB],
CAST(f.size/128.0 - CAST(FILEPROPERTY(f.name, 'SpaceUsed') AS int)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(15,2)) 
AS [Available Space In MB], f.[file_id], fg.name AS [Filegroup Name],
f.is_percent_growth, f.growth, fg.is_default, fg.is_read_only
FROM sys.database_files AS f WITH (NOLOCK) 
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.filegroups AS fg WITH (NOLOCK)
ON f.data_space_id = fg.data_space_id
ORDER BY f.[file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at how large and how full the files are and where they are located
-- Make sure the transaction log is not full!!


-- Log space usage for current database  (Query 51) (Log Space Usage)
SELECT DB_NAME(lsu.database_id) AS [Database Name], db.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model],
		CAST(lsu.total_log_size_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Total Log Space (MB)],
		CAST(lsu.used_log_space_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Used Log Space (MB)], 
		CAST(lsu.used_log_space_in_percent AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Used Log Space %],
		CAST(lsu.log_space_in_bytes_since_last_backup/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Used Log Space Since Last Backup (MB)],
		db.log_reuse_wait_desc		 
FROM sys.dm_db_log_space_usage AS lsu WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.databases AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
ON lsu.database_id = db.database_id
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at log file size and usage, along with the log reuse wait description for the current database


-- I/O Statistics by file for the current database  (Query 52) (IO Stats By File)
SELECT DB_NAME(DB_ID()) AS [Database Name], df.name AS [Logical Name], vfs.[file_id], df.type_desc,
df.physical_name AS [Physical Name], CAST(vfs.size_on_disk_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Size on Disk (MB)],
vfs.num_of_reads, vfs.num_of_writes, vfs.io_stall_read_ms, vfs.io_stall_write_ms,
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_read_ms/(vfs.io_stall_read_ms + vfs.io_stall_write_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_write_ms/(vfs.io_stall_write_ms + vfs.io_stall_read_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Writes Pct],
(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS [Writes + Reads], 
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_read/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Read], 
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_written/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Written],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_reads/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_writes/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Write Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_read/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Read Bytes Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_written/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Written Bytes Pct]
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(DB_ID(), NULL) AS vfs
INNER JOIN sys.database_files AS df WITH (NOLOCK)
ON vfs.[file_id]= df.[file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you characterize your workload better from an I/O perspective for this database
-- It helps you determine whether you has an OLTP or DW/DSS type of workload



-- Get most frequently executed queries for this database (Query 53) (Query Execution Counts)
SELECT TOP(50) LEFT(t.[text], 50) AS [Short Query Text], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
qs.total_logical_reads AS [Total Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time AS [Total Elapsed Time],
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
WHERE t.dbid = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Queries 54 through 59 are the "Bad Man List" for stored procedures

-- Top Cached SPs By Execution Count (Query 54) (SP Execution Counts)
SELECT TOP(100) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time],    
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you which cached stored procedures are called the most often
-- This helps you characterize and baseline your workload


-- Top Cached SPs By Avg Elapsed Time (Query 55) (SP Avg Elapsed Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.min_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time, qs.last_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], 
qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY avg_elapsed_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find high average elapsed time cached stored procedures that
-- may be easy to optimize with standard query tuning techniques



-- Top Cached SPs By Total Worker time. Worker time relates to CPU cost  (Query 56) (SP Worker Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a CPU perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of CPU pressure


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Reads. Logical reads relate to memory pressure  (Query 57) (SP Logical Reads)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_reads AS [TotalLogicalReads], 
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalReads],qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute], 
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a memory perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of memory pressure


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Physical Reads. Physical reads relate to disk read I/O pressure  (Query 58) (SP Physical Reads)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name],qs.total_physical_reads AS [TotalPhysicalReads], 
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgPhysicalReads], qs.execution_count, 
qs.total_logical_reads,qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan 
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND qs.total_physical_reads > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_physical_reads DESC, qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a read I/O perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of I/O pressure or of memory pressure


       
-- Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Writes (Query 59) (SP Logical Writes)
-- Logical writes relate to both memory and disk I/O pressure 
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_writes AS [TotalLogicalWrites], 
qs.total_logical_writes/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalWrites], qs.execution_count,
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan 
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND qs.total_logical_writes > 0
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_writes DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a write I/O perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of I/O pressure or of memory pressure


-- Lists the top statements by average input/output usage for the current database  (Query 60) (Top IO Statements)
SELECT TOP(50) OBJECT_NAME(qt.objectid, dbid) AS [SP Name],
(qs.total_logical_reads + qs.total_logical_writes) /qs.execution_count AS [Avg IO], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
SUBSTRING(qt.[text],qs.statement_start_offset/2, 
	(CASE 
		WHEN qs.statement_end_offset = -1 
	 THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 
		ELSE qs.statement_end_offset 
	 END - qs.statement_start_offset)/2) AS [Query Text]	
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) AS qt
WHERE qt.[dbid] = DB_ID()
ORDER BY [Avg IO] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you find the most expensive statements for I/O by SP



-- Possible Bad NC Indexes (writes > reads)  (Query 61) (Bad NC Indexes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(s.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], i.name AS [Index Name], i.index_id, 
i.is_disabled, i.is_hypothetical, i.has_filter, i.fill_factor,
s.user_updates AS [Total Writes], s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads],
s.user_updates - (s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups) AS [Difference]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(s.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
AND s.user_updates > (s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups)
AND i.index_id > 1 AND i.[type_desc] = N'NONCLUSTERED'
AND i.is_primary_key = 0 AND i.is_unique_constraint = 0 AND i.is_unique = 0
ORDER BY [Difference] DESC, [Total Writes] DESC, [Total Reads] ASC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look for indexes with high numbers of writes and zero or very low numbers of reads
-- Consider your complete workload, and how long your instance has been running
-- Investigate further before dropping an index!


-- Missing Indexes for current database by Index Advantage  (Query 62) (Missing Indexes)
SELECT CONVERT(decimal(18,2), user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01)) AS [index_advantage], 
migs.last_user_seek, mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement]) AS [missing_indexes_for_table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement], equality_columns) AS [similar_missing_indexes_for_table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, 
CONVERT(decimal(18,2), migs.avg_total_user_cost) AS [avg_total_user_cost], migs.avg_user_impact,
OBJECT_NAME(mid.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], p.rows AS [Table Rows]
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = mid.[object_id]
WHERE mid.database_id = DB_ID()
AND p.index_id < 2 
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at index advantage, last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
-- SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware
-- Do not just blindly add indexes that show up from this query!!!


-- Find missing index warnings for cached plans in the current database  (Query 63) (Missing Index Warnings)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a busy instance
SELECT TOP(25) OBJECT_NAME(objectid) AS [ObjectName], 
               cp.objtype, cp.usecounts, cp.size_in_bytes, query_plan
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(cp.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE CAST(query_plan AS NVARCHAR(MAX)) LIKE N'%MissingIndex%'
AND dbid = DB_ID()
ORDER BY cp.usecounts DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you connect missing indexes to specific stored procedures or queries
-- This can help you decide whether to add them or not


-- Breaks down buffers used by current database by object (table, index) in the buffer cache  (Query 64) (Buffer Usage)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a busy instance
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) AS [Object Name], p.index_id, 
CAST(COUNT(*)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Buffer size(MB)],  
COUNT(*) AS [BufferCount], p.[Rows] AS [Row Count],
p.data_compression_desc AS [Compression Type]
FROM sys.allocation_units AS a WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors AS b WITH (NOLOCK)
ON a.allocation_unit_id = b.allocation_unit_id
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON a.container_id = p.hobt_id
WHERE b.database_id = CONVERT(int, DB_ID())
AND p.[object_id] > 100
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'plan_%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'xml_index_nodes%'
GROUP BY p.[object_id], p.index_id, p.data_compression_desc, p.[Rows]
ORDER BY [BufferCount] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you what tables and indexes are using the most memory in the buffer cache
-- It can help identify possible candidates for data compression


-- Get Table names, row counts, and compression status for clustered index or heap  (Query 65) (Table Sizes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS [ObjectName], 
SUM(Rows) AS [RowCount], data_compression_desc AS [CompressionType]
FROM sys.partitions WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE index_id < 2 --ignore the partitions from the non-clustered index if any
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'queue_%' 
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'filestream_tombstone%' 
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'fulltext%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'ifts_comp_fragment%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'filetable_updates%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'xml_index_nodes%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'sqlagent_job%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'plan_persist%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'persistent_version_store%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'persistent_version_store_long_term%'
GROUP BY object_id, data_compression_desc
ORDER BY SUM(Rows) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you an idea of table sizes, and possible data compression opportunities



-- Get some key table properties (Query 66) (Table Properties)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], p.[rows] AS [Table Rows], p.index_id, 
       p.data_compression_desc AS [Index Data Compression],
       t.create_date, t.lock_on_bulk_load, t.is_replicated, t.has_replication_filter, 
       t.is_tracked_by_cdc, t.lock_escalation_desc, t.is_filetable, 
	   t.is_memory_optimized, t.durability_desc  -- new for SQL Server 2014
FROM sys.tables AS t WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON t.[object_id] = p.[object_id]
WHERE OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
ORDER BY OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]), p.index_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some good information about your tables
-- Is Memory optimized and durability description are Hekaton-related properties that were new in SQL Server 2014



-- When were Statistics last updated on all indexes?  (Query 67) (Statistics Update)
SELECT SCHEMA_NAME(o.Schema_ID) + N'.' + o.[NAME] AS [Object Name], o.[type_desc] AS [Object Type],
      i.[name] AS [Index Name], STATS_DATE(i.[object_id], i.index_id) AS [Statistics Date], 
      s.auto_created, s.no_recompute, s.user_created, s.is_incremental, s.is_temporary,
	  st.row_count, st.used_page_count
FROM sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON o.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id] 
AND i.index_id = s.stats_id
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_partition_stats AS st WITH (NOLOCK)
ON o.[object_id] = st.[object_id]
AND i.[index_id] = st.[index_id]
WHERE o.[type] IN ('U', 'V')
AND st.row_count > 0
ORDER BY STATS_DATE(i.[object_id], i.index_id) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------  

-- Helps discover possible problems with out-of-date statistics
-- Also gives you an idea which indexes are the most active

-- sys.stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2GyAxrn

-- UPDATEs to Statistics (Erin Stellato)
-- https://bit.ly/2vhrYQy



-- Look at most frequently modified indexes and statistics (Query 68) (Volatile Indexes)
SELECT o.[name] AS [Object Name], o.[object_id], o.[type_desc], s.[name] AS [Statistics Name], 
       s.stats_id, s.no_recompute, s.auto_created, s.is_incremental, s.is_temporary,
	   sp.modification_counter, sp.[rows], sp.rows_sampled, sp.last_updated
FROM sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.object_id = o.object_id
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_db_stats_properties(s.object_id, s.stats_id) AS sp
WHERE o.[type_desc] NOT IN (N'SYSTEM_TABLE', N'INTERNAL_TABLE')
AND sp.modification_counter > 0
ORDER BY sp.modification_counter DESC, o.name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you understand your workload and make better decisions about 
-- things like data compression and adding new indexes to a table



-- Get fragmentation info for all indexes above a certain size in the current database  (Query 69) (Index Fragmentation)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a very large database
SELECT DB_NAME(ps.database_id) AS [Database Name], SCHEMA_NAME(o.[schema_id]) AS [Schema Name],
OBJECT_NAME(ps.OBJECT_ID) AS [Object Name], i.[name] AS [Index Name], ps.index_id, 
ps.index_type_desc, ps.avg_fragmentation_in_percent, 
ps.fragment_count, ps.page_count, i.fill_factor, i.has_filter, 
i.filter_definition, i.[allow_page_locks]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats(DB_ID(),NULL, NULL, NULL , N'LIMITED') AS ps
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ps.[object_id] = i.[object_id] 
AND ps.index_id = i.index_id
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
WHERE ps.database_id = DB_ID()
AND ps.page_count > 2500
ORDER BY ps.avg_fragmentation_in_percent DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine whether you have framentation in your relational indexes
-- and how effective your index maintenance strategy is


--- Index Read/Write stats (all tables in current DB) ordered by Reads  (Query 70) (Overall Index Usage - Reads)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], i.[name] AS [IndexName], i.index_id, 
       s.user_seeks, s.user_scans, s.user_lookups,
	   s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads], 
	   s.user_updates AS [Writes],  
	   i.[type_desc] AS [Index Type], i.fill_factor AS [Fill Factor], i.has_filter, i.filter_definition, 
	   s.last_user_scan, s.last_user_lookup, s.last_user_seek
FROM sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(i.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
ORDER BY s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE); -- Order by reads
------

-- Show which indexes in the current database are most active for Reads


--- Index Read/Write stats (all tables in current DB) ordered by Writes  (Query 71) (Overall Index Usage - Writes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], i.[name] AS [IndexName], i.index_id,
	   s.user_updates AS [Writes], s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads], 
	   i.[type_desc] AS [Index Type], i.fill_factor AS [Fill Factor], i.has_filter, i.filter_definition,
	   s.last_system_update, s.last_user_update
FROM sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(i.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
ORDER BY s.user_updates DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);						 -- Order by writes
------

-- Show which indexes in the current database are most active for Writes


-- Get in-memory OLTP index usage (Query 72) (XTP Index Usage)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [Object Name], i.index_id, i.[name] AS [Index Name],
       i.[type_desc], xis.scans_started, xis.scans_retries, 
	   xis.rows_touched, xis.rows_returned
FROM sys.dm_db_xtp_index_stats AS xis WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = xis.[object_id] 
AND i.index_id = xis.index_id 
ORDER BY OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This gives you some index usage statistics for in-memory OLTP
-- Returns no data if you are not using in-memory OLTP

-- Guidelines for Using Indexes on Memory-Optimized Tables
-- https://bit.ly/2GCP8lF


-- Get lock waits for current database (Query 73) (Lock Waits)
SELECT o.name AS [table_name], i.name AS [index_name], ios.index_id, ios.partition_number,
		SUM(ios.row_lock_wait_count) AS [total_row_lock_waits], 
		SUM(ios.row_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_row_lock_wait_in_ms],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_count) AS [total_page_lock_waits],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_page_lock_wait_in_ms],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms)+ SUM(row_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_lock_wait_in_ms]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_operational_stats(DB_ID(), NULL, NULL, NULL) AS ios
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ios.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ios.[object_id] = i.[object_id] 
AND ios.index_id = i.index_id
WHERE o.[object_id] > 100
GROUP BY o.name, i.name, ios.index_id, ios.partition_number
HAVING SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms)+ SUM(row_lock_wait_in_ms) > 0
ORDER BY total_lock_wait_in_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This query is helpful for troubleshooting blocking and deadlocking issues


-- Get input buffer information for the current database (Query 74) (Input Buffer)
SELECT es.session_id, DB_NAME(es.database_id) AS [Database Name],
es.login_time, es.cpu_time, es.logical_reads,
es.[status], ib.event_info AS [Input Buffer]
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions AS es WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_input_buffer(es.session_id, NULL) AS ib
WHERE es.database_id = DB_ID()
AND es.session_id > 50
AND es.session_id <> @@SPID OPTION (RECOMPILE);

-- Gives you input buffer information from all non-system sessions for the current database
-- Replaces DBCC INPUTBUFFER
-- Requires SQL Server 2014 SP2 or later

-- New DMF for retrieving input buffer in SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2uHKMbz


-- Look at recent Full backups for the current database (Query 75) (Recent Full Backups)
SELECT TOP (30) bs.machine_name, bs.server_name, bs.database_name AS [Database Name], bs.recovery_model,
CONVERT (BIGINT, bs.backup_size / 1048576 ) AS [Uncompressed Backup Size (MB)],
CONVERT (BIGINT, bs.compressed_backup_size / 1048576 ) AS [Compressed Backup Size (MB)],
CONVERT (NUMERIC (20,2), (CONVERT (FLOAT, bs.backup_size) /
CONVERT (FLOAT, bs.compressed_backup_size))) AS [Compression Ratio], bs.has_backup_checksums, bs.is_copy_only, bs.encryptor_type,
DATEDIFF (SECOND, bs.backup_start_date, bs.backup_finish_date) AS [Backup Elapsed Time (sec)],
bs.backup_finish_date AS [Backup Finish Date], bmf.physical_device_name AS [Backup Location], bmf.physical_block_size
FROM msdb.dbo.backupset AS bs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.backupmediafamily AS bmf WITH (NOLOCK)
ON bs.media_set_id = bmf.media_set_id  
WHERE bs.database_name = DB_NAME(DB_ID())
AND bs.[type] = 'D' -- Change to L if you want Log backups
ORDER BY bs.backup_finish_date DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Are your backup sizes and times changing over time?
-- Are you using backup compression?
-- Are you using backup checksums?
-- Are you doing copy_only backups?
-- Are you doing encrypted backups?
-- Have you done any backup tuning with striped backups, or changing the parameters of the backup command?


-- These three Pluralsight Courses go into more detail about how to run these queries and interpret the results

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 1 
-- https://bit.ly/2plxCer

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 2
-- https://bit.ly/2IuJpzI

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 3
-- https://bit.ly/2FIlCPb



-- Sign up for Microsoft Visual Studio Dev Essentials and get a free three month pass to Pluralsight

-- Microsoft Visual Studio Dev Essentials
-- https://bit.ly/1q6xbDL


-- Sign up for Microsoft Azure Essentials and get lots of free Azure usage credits, MCP exam voucher, three month Pluralsight subscription

-- Microsoft Azure Essentials
-- https://bit.ly/2JMWe8x


-- August 2017 blog series about upgrading and migrating SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2ftKVrX
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\dbaSystem\DbaErrorRecord.cs
using System;
using System.Management.Automation;

namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.dbaSystem
{
    /// <summary>
    /// An error record written by dbatools
    /// </summary>
    [Serializable]
    public class DbaErrorRecord
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The category of the error
        /// </summary>
        public ErrorCategoryInfo CategoryInfo;

        /// <summary>
        /// The details on the error
        /// </summary>
        public ErrorDetails ErrorDetails;

        /// <summary>
        /// The actual exception thrown
        /// </summary>
        public Exception Exception;

        /// <summary>
        /// The specific error identity, used to identify the target
        /// </summary>
        public string FullyQualifiedErrorId;

        /// <summary>
        /// The details of how this was called.
        /// </summary>
        public object InvocationInfo;

        /// <summary>
        /// The script's stacktrace
        /// </summary>
        public string ScriptStackTrace;

        /// <summary>
        /// The object being processed
        /// </summary>
        public object TargetObject;

        /// <summary>
        /// The name of the function throwing the error
        /// </summary>
        public string FunctionName;

        /// <summary>
        /// When was the error thrown
        /// </summary>
        public DateTime Timestamp;

        /// <summary>
        /// The message that was written in a userfriendly manner
        /// </summary>
        public string Message;

        /// <summary>
        /// The runspace the error occured on.
        /// </summary>
        public Guid Runspace;

        /// <summary>
        /// Create an empty record
        /// </summary>
        public DbaErrorRecord()
        {

        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Create a filled out error record
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Record">The original error record</param>
        /// <param name="FunctionName">The function that wrote the error</param>
        /// <param name="Timestamp">When was the error generated</param>
        /// <param name="Message">What message was passed when writing the error</param>
        public DbaErrorRecord(ErrorRecord Record, string FunctionName, DateTime Timestamp, string Message)
        {
            this.FunctionName = FunctionName;
            this.Timestamp = Timestamp;
            this.Message = Message;

            CategoryInfo = Record.CategoryInfo;
            ErrorDetails = Record.ErrorDetails;
            Exception = Record.Exception;
            FullyQualifiedErrorId = Record.FullyQualifiedErrorId;
            InvocationInfo = Record.InvocationInfo;
            ScriptStackTrace = Record.ScriptStackTrace;
            TargetObject = Record.TargetObject;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Create a filled out error record
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Record">The original error record</param>
        /// <param name="FunctionName">The function that wrote the error</param>
        /// <param name="Timestamp">When was the error generated</param>
        /// <param name="Message">What message was passed when writing the error</param>
        /// <param name="Runspace">The ID of the runspace writing the error. Used to separate output between different runspaces in the same process.</param>
        public DbaErrorRecord(ErrorRecord Record, string FunctionName, DateTime Timestamp, string Message, Guid Runspace)
        {
            this.FunctionName = FunctionName;
            this.Timestamp = Timestamp;
            this.Message = Message;
            this.Runspace = Runspace;

            CategoryInfo = Record.CategoryInfo;
            ErrorDetails = Record.ErrorDetails;
            Exception = Record.Exception;
            FullyQualifiedErrorId = Record.FullyQualifiedErrorId;
            InvocationInfo = Record.InvocationInfo;
            ScriptStackTrace = Record.ScriptStackTrace;
            TargetObject = Record.TargetObject;
        }
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\dbaSystem\DebugHost.cs
using System;
using System.Collections.Concurrent;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Management.Automation;

namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.dbaSystem
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Hosts static debugging values and methods
    /// </summary>
    public static class DebugHost
    {
        #region Start Times
        /// <summary>
        /// Lists the duration for the last import of dbatools.
        /// </summary>
        public static List<StartTimeEntry> ImportTimeEntries = new List<StartTimeEntry>();

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns the calculated time each phase took during the last import of dbatool.
        /// </summary>
        public static List<StartTimeResult> ImportTime
        {
            get
            {
                List<StartTimeResult> result = new List<StartTimeResult>();
                int n = 0;
                foreach (StartTimeEntry entry in ImportTimeEntries)
                    if (n++ > 0)
                        result.Add(new StartTimeResult(entry.Action, ImportTimeEntries[n - 2].Timestamp, entry.Timestamp));

                return result;
            }
        }
        #endregion Start Times
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\diagnosticquery\SQLServerDiagnosticQueries_2012_201807.sql

-- SQL Server 2012 Diagnostic Information Queries
-- Glenn Berry 
-- Last Modified: August 2, 2018
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/
-- http://sqlserverperformance.wordpress.com/
-- Twitter: GlennAlanBerry

-- Please listen to my Pluralsight courses
-- https://www.pluralsight.com/author/glenn-berry

-- If you want to find all of our SQLskills SQL101 blog posts, check out https://www.sqlskills.com/help/sql101/


-- Please make sure you are using the correct version of these diagnostic queries for your version of SQL Server


-- If you like PowerShell, there is a very useful community solution for running these queries in an automated fashion
-- https://dbatools.io/

-- Invoke-DbaDiagnosticQuery
-- https://dbatools.io/functions/invoke-dbadiagnosticquery/


--******************************************************************************
--*   Copyright (C) 2018 Glenn Berry, SQLskills.com
--*   All rights reserved. 
--*
--*   For more scripts and sample code, check out 
--*      https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn
--*
--*   You may alter this code for your own *non-commercial* purposes. You may
--*   republish altered code as long as you include this copyright and give due credit. 
--*
--*
--*   THIS CODE AND INFORMATION ARE PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF 
--*   ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED 
--*   TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND/OR FITNESS FOR A
--*   PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
--*
--******************************************************************************

-- Check the major product version to see if it is SQL Server 2012
IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * WHERE CONVERT(varchar(128), SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion')) LIKE '11%')
	BEGIN
		DECLARE @ProductVersion varchar(128) = CONVERT(varchar(128), SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion'));
		RAISERROR ('Script does not match the ProductVersion [%s] of this instance. Many of these queries may not work on this version.' , 18 , 16 , @ProductVersion);
	END
	ELSE
		PRINT N'You have the correct major version of SQL Server for this diagnostic information script';


-- Instance level queries *******************************

-- SQL and OS Version information for current instance  (Query 1) (Version Info)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], @@VERSION AS [SQL Server and OS Version Info];
------

-- SQL Server 2012 RTM Branch Builds						SQL Server 2012 SP1 Branch Builds					SQL Server 2012 SP2 Branch Builds						SQL Server 2012 SP3 Branch Builds					SQL Server 2012 SP4 Branch Builds
-- Build			Description			Release Date		Build			Description		Release Date		Build			Description		    Release Date        Build			Description		    Release Date	Build			Description		    Release Date
-- 11.0.2100		RTM					  3/6/2012  
-- 11.0.2316		RTM CU1				 4/12/2012
-- 11.0.2325        RTM CU2				 6/18/2012 -->		11.0.3000		SP1 RTM			11/7/2012
-- 11.0.2332		RTM CU3				 8/31/2012
-- 11.0.2376	    RTM CU3 + QFE	     10/9/2012
-- 11.0.2383	    RTM CU4			    10/15/2012 -->		11.0.3321		SP1 CU1			11/20/2012
-- 11.0.2395		RTM CU5				12/17/2012 -->      11.0.3339		SP1 CU2			1/21/2013
-- 11.0.2401        RTM CU6              2/18/2013 -->      11.0.3349       SP1 CU3			3/18/2013
-- 11.0.2405        RTM CU7              4/15/2013 -->      11.0 3368       SP1 CU4         5/30/2013
-- 11.0.2410        RTM CU8              6/17/2013 -->      11.0.3373       SP1 CU5         7/15/2013
-- 11.0.2419        RTM CU9              8/20/2013 -->      11.0.3381		SP1 CU6			9/16/2013
-- 11.0.2420        RTM CU10            10/21/2013 -->		11.0.3393       SP1 CU7         11/18/2013
-- 11.0.2424        RTM CU11            12/16/2003 -->      11.0.3401       SP1 CU8         1/20/2014
--                                                          11.0.3412       SP1 CU9         3/17/2014 -->		11.0.5058		SP2 RTM			    6/10/2014
--                                                          11.0.3431       SP1 CU10        5/19/2014
--                                                          11.0.3449       SP1 CU11        7/21/2014 -->		11.0.5532		SP2 CU1			    7/23/2014
--                                                          11.0.3470       SP1 CU12        9/15/2014 -->       11.0.5548       SP2 CU2             9/15/2014
--                                                          11.0.3482		SP1 CU13        11/17/2014-->       11.0.5556		SP2 CU3            11/17/2014
--                                                          11.0.3486       SP1 CU14        1/19/2015 -->       11.0.5569       SP2 CU4             1/19/2015
--                                                                                                              11.0.5571       SP2 CU4 + COD HF     2/4/2015  
--                                                          11.0.3487		SP1 CU15		3/16/2015 -->       11.0.5582       SP2 CU5             3/16/2015
--															11.0.3492       SP1 CU16        5/18/2015 -->       11.0.5592		SP2 CU6				5/18/2015
--                                                                                                              11.0.5623       SP2 CU7				7/20/2015
--                                                                                                              11.0.5634		SP2 CU8				9/21/2015
--																												11.0.5641		SP2 CU9			   11/16/2015   ---->  11.0.6020		SP3 RTM			11/21/2015
--																												11.0.5644		SP2 CU10			1/18/2016   ---->  11.0.6518		SP3 CU1			 1/18/2016
--																												11.0.5646		SP2 CU11			3/21/2016	---->  11.0.6523		SP3 CU2			 3/21/2016
--																												11.0.5649		SP2 CU12			5/16/2016	---->  11.0.6537		SP3 CU3			 5/16/2016
--																												11.0.5655		SP2 CU13			7/18/2016	---->  11.0.6540		SP3 CU4			 7/18/2016	
--																												11.0.5657		SP2 CU14		    9/19/2016   ---->  11.0.6544		SP3 CU5			 9/20/2016
--																												11.0.5676		SP2 CU15 		   11/16/2016   ---->  11.0.6567		SP3 CU6 		11/16/2016
--																												11.0.5678		SP2 CU16			1/17/2017   ---->  11.0.6579		SP3 CU7			 1/17/2017
--																																									   11.0.6594		SP3 CU8			 3/20/2017
--																																									   11.0.6598		SP3 CU9			 5/15/2017																											                                                            				
--																																									   11.0.6607		SP3 CU10		  8/8/2017																											
--																																																							11.0.7001		SP4 RTM				10/3/2017	
-- 
-- Security Update for SQL Server 2012 SP4 (KB4057116) 
-- https://bit.ly/2F33Sc4
--                                                                                                                                                                                                                          11.0.7462	    Security Update		1/12/2018  (Security Update for SQL Server 2012 SP4 (KB4057116))
-- SQL Server 2012 Service Pack 4 (SP4) Released!
-- https://bit.ly/2qN8kr3

-- How to determine the version, edition and update level of SQL Server and its components 
-- https://bit.ly/2oAjKgW	

-- SQL Server 2012 SP3 build versions
-- https://bit.ly/2HFjAzA 

-- SQL Server 2012 SP2 build versions 
-- https://bit.ly/2qLqqcS

-- The SQL Server 2012 builds that were released after SQL Server 2012 Service Pack 1 was released
-- https://bit.ly/2HG21za

-- The SQL Server 2012 builds that were released after SQL Server 2012 was released
-- https://bit.ly/2K1xZnX

-- Where to find information about the latest SQL Server builds
-- https://bit.ly/2IGHbfY

-- Recommended updates and configuration options for SQL Server 2012 and SQL Server 2014 used with high-performance workloads
-- https://bit.ly/2Hy3zIZ

-- Performance and Stability Related Fixes in Post-SQL Server 2012 SP3 Builds
-- https://bit.ly/2woDJ4Z

-- Performance and Stability Related Fixes in Post-SQL Server 2012 SP2 Builds
-- https://bit.ly/2vuKZzp

-- Performance and Stability Related Fixes in Post-SQL Server 2012 SP1 Builds
-- https://bit.ly/2vBt1LC

-- Performance Related Fixes in Post-SQL Server 2012 RTM Builds
-- https://bit.ly/2vuIQn4

-- Announcing updates to the SQL Server Incremental Servicing Model (ISM)
-- https://bit.ly/1RzYITz

-- Update Center for Microsoft SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2pZptuQ

-- Download SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS)
-- https://bit.ly/1OcupT9

-- Download and install Microsoft SQL Operations Studio 
-- https://bit.ly/2vgke1A


-- Get socket, physical core and logical core count from the SQL Server Error log. (Query 2) (Core Counts)
-- This query might take a few seconds depending on the size of your error log 
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'detected', N'socket';
------

-- This can help you determine the exact core counts used by SQL Server and whether HT is enabled or not
-- It can also help you confirm your SQL Server licensing model
-- Be on the lookout for this message "using 40 logical processors based on SQL Server licensing" 
-- (when you have more than 40 logical cores) which means grandfathered Server/CAL licensing
-- This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was last started
-- New in SQL Server 2012 SP4



-- Get selected server properties (Query 3) (Server Properties)
SELECT SERVERPROPERTY('MachineName') AS [MachineName], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ServerName') AS [ServerName],  
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceName') AS [Instance], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsClustered') AS [IsClustered], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS') AS [ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS], 
SERVERPROPERTY('Edition') AS [Edition], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductLevel') AS [ProductLevel],				-- What servicing branch (RTM/SP/CU)
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductUpdateLevel') AS [ProductUpdateLevel],	-- Within a servicing branch, what CU# is applied
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion') AS [ProductVersion],
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductMajorVersion') AS [ProductMajorVersion], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductMinorVersion') AS [ProductMinorVersion], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductBuild') AS [ProductBuild], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductBuildType') AS [ProductBuildType],		      -- Is this a GDR or OD hotfix (NULL if on a CU build)
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductUpdateReference') AS [ProductUpdateReference], -- KB article number that is applicable for this build
SERVERPROPERTY('ProcessID') AS [ProcessID],
SERVERPROPERTY('Collation') AS [Collation], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsFullTextInstalled') AS [IsFullTextInstalled], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsIntegratedSecurityOnly') AS [IsIntegratedSecurityOnly],
SERVERPROPERTY('FilestreamConfiguredLevel') AS [FilestreamConfiguredLevel],
SERVERPROPERTY('IsHadrEnabled') AS [IsHadrEnabled], 
SERVERPROPERTY('HadrManagerStatus') AS [HadrManagerStatus],
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceDefaultDataPath') AS [InstanceDefaultDataPath],
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceDefaultLogPath') AS [InstanceDefaultLogPath],
SERVERPROPERTY('BuildClrVersion') AS [Build CLR Version];
------

-- This gives you a lot of useful information about your instance of SQL Server,
-- such as the ProcessID for SQL Server and your collation
-- Note: Some columns will be NULL on older SQL Server builds

-- SERVERPROPERTY (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2eeaXeI


-- Get instance-level configuration values for instance  (Query 4) (Configuration Values)
SELECT name, value, value_in_use, minimum, maximum, [description], is_dynamic, is_advanced
FROM sys.configurations WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Focus on these settings:
-- backup compression default (should be 1 in most cases)
-- clr enabled (only enable if it is needed)
-- cost threshold for parallelism (depends on your workload)
-- lightweight pooling (should be zero)
-- max degree of parallelism (depends on your workload and hardware)
-- max server memory (MB) (set to an appropriate value, not the default)
-- optimize for ad hoc workloads (should be 1)
-- priority boost (should be zero)
-- remote admin connections (should be 1)


-- Returns a list of all global trace flags that are enabled (Query 5) (Global Trace Flags)
DBCC TRACESTATUS (-1);
------

-- If no global trace flags are enabled, no results will be returned.
-- It is very useful to know what global trace flags are currently enabled as part of the diagnostic process.

-- Common trace flags that should be enabled in most cases
-- TF 1117 - When growing a data file, grow all files at the same time so they remain the same size, reducing allocation contention points
--           https://bit.ly/2GY1kOl
-- 
-- TF 1118 - Helps alleviate allocation contention in tempdb, SQL Server allocates full extents to each database object, 
--           thereby eliminating the contention on SGAM pages (more important with older versions of SQL Server)
--           Recommendations to reduce allocation contention in SQL Server tempdb database
--           https://bit.ly/2GY1kOl

-- TF 2371 - Lowers auto update statistics threshold for large tables (on tables with more than 25,000 rows)
--           https://bit.ly/2HySkAg

-- TF 3023 - Enables backup checksum default
--           https://bit.ly/2vtjqqc

-- TF 3226 - Supresses logging of successful database backup messages to the SQL Server Error Log
--           https://bit.ly/2p6MTjS

-- TF 3449 - Enables use of dirty page manager (SQL Server 2012 SP3 CU3 and later)
--			 https://bit.ly/2uj0h5M

-- TF 6533 - Spatial performance improvements in SQL Server 2012 and 2014
--           https://bit.ly/2v7C7ze

-- TF 6534 - Enables use of native code to improve performance with spatial data
--           https://bit.ly/2HrQUpU

-- TF 8079 - Enables automatic soft-NUMA on systems with eight or more physical cores per NUMA node (with SQL Server 2012 SP4)
--           https://bit.ly/2qN8kr3

-- DBCC TRACEON - Trace Flags (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2FuSvPg


-- Returns status of instant file initialization (Query 6) (IFI Status)
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'Database Instant File Initialization';
------

-- Lets you determine whether Instant File Initialization (IFI) is enabled for the instance
-- This should be enabled in the vast majority of cases
-- (Added in SQL Server 2012 SP4)

-- Database Instant File Initialization
-- https://bit.ly/2nTX74y

-- Misconceptions around instant file initialization
-- https://bit.ly/2oBSKgZ



-- SQL Server Process Address space info  (Query 7) (Process Memory)
-- (shows whether locked pages is enabled, among other things)
SELECT physical_memory_in_use_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Memory Usage (MB)],
	   locked_page_allocations_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Locked Pages Allocation (MB)],
       large_page_allocations_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Large Pages Allocation (MB)], 
	   page_fault_count, memory_utilization_percentage, available_commit_limit_kb, 
	   process_physical_memory_low, process_virtual_memory_low
FROM sys.dm_os_process_memory WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You want to see 0 for process_physical_memory_low
-- You want to see 0 for process_virtual_memory_low
-- This indicates that you are not under internal memory pressure
-- If locked_page_allocations_kb > 0, then LPIM is enabled

-- How to enable the "locked pages" feature in SQL Server 2012
-- https://bit.ly/2F5UjOA

-- Memory Management Architecture Guide
-- https://bit.ly/2JKkadC 



-- SQL Server Services information (Query 8) (SQL Server Services Info)
SELECT servicename, process_id, startup_type_desc, status_desc, 
last_startup_time, service_account, is_clustered, cluster_nodename, [filename]
FROM sys.dm_server_services WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you the account being used for the SQL Server Service and the SQL Agent Service
-- Shows the process_id, when they were last started, and their current status
-- Also shows whether you are running on a failover cluster instance, and what node you are running on

-- sys.dm_server_services (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2oKa1Un


-- Last backup information by database  (Query 9) (Last Backup By Database)
SELECT ISNULL(d.[name], bs.[database_name]) AS [Database], d.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model], 
       d.log_reuse_wait_desc AS [Log Reuse Wait Desc],
    MAX(CASE WHEN [type] = 'D' THEN bs.backup_finish_date ELSE NULL END) AS [Last Full Backup],
    MAX(CASE WHEN [type] = 'I' THEN bs.backup_finish_date ELSE NULL END) AS [Last Differential Backup],
    MAX(CASE WHEN [type] = 'L' THEN bs.backup_finish_date ELSE NULL END) AS [Last Log Backup]
FROM sys.databases AS d WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.backupset AS bs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON bs.[database_name] = d.[name] 
AND bs.backup_finish_date > GETDATE()- 30
WHERE d.name <> N'tempdb'
GROUP BY ISNULL(d.[name], bs.[database_name]), d.recovery_model_desc, d.log_reuse_wait_desc, d.[name] 
ORDER BY d.recovery_model_desc, d.[name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you spot runaway transaction logs and other issues with your backup schedule


-- Get SQL Server Agent jobs and Category information (Query 10) (SQL Server Agent Jobs)
SELECT sj.name AS [Job Name], sj.[description] AS [Job Description], SUSER_SNAME(sj.owner_sid) AS [Job Owner],
sj.date_created AS [Date Created], sj.[enabled] AS [Job Enabled], 
sj.notify_email_operator_id, sj.notify_level_email, sc.name AS [CategoryName],
s.[enabled] AS [Sched Enabled], js.next_run_date, js.next_run_time
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobs AS sj WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.syscategories AS sc WITH (NOLOCK)
ON sj.category_id = sc.category_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobschedules AS js WITH (NOLOCK)
ON sj.job_id = js.job_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysschedules AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON js.schedule_id = s.schedule_id
ORDER BY sj.name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some basic information about your SQL Server Agent jobs, who owns them and how they are configured
-- Look for Agent jobs that are not owned by sa
-- Look for jobs that have a notify_email_operator_id set to 0 (meaning no operator)
-- Look for jobs that have a notify_level_email set to 0 (meaning no e-mail is ever sent)
--
-- MSDN sysjobs documentation
-- https://bit.ly/2paDEOP

-- SQL Server Maintenance Solution
-- https://bit.ly/1pgchQu


-- Get SQL Server Agent Alert Information (Query 11) (SQL Server Agent Alerts)
SELECT name, event_source, message_id, severity, [enabled], has_notification, 
       delay_between_responses, occurrence_count, last_occurrence_date, last_occurrence_time
FROM msdb.dbo.sysalerts WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some basic information about your SQL Server Agent Alerts (which are different from SQL Server Agent jobs)
-- Read more about Agent Alerts here: https://bit.ly/2Giz0Xf



-- Windows information (Query 12) (Windows Info)
SELECT windows_release, windows_service_pack_level, 
       windows_sku, os_language_version
FROM sys.dm_os_windows_info WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you major OS version, Service Pack, Edition, and language info for the operating system
-- 10.0 is either Windows 10 or Windows Server 2016
-- 6.3 is either Windows 8.1, or Windows Server 2012 R2  
-- 6.2 is either Windows 8 or Windows Server 2012
-- 6.1 is either Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2
-- 6.0 is either Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008

-- Windows SKU codes
-- 4 is Enterprise Edition
-- 7 is Standard Server Edition
-- 8 is Datacenter Server Edition
-- 10 is Enterprise Server Edition
-- 48 is Professional Edition
-- 161 is Pro for Workstations

-- 1033 for os_language_version is US-English

-- SQL Server 2012 requires Windows Server 2008 SP2 or newer

-- Hardware and Software Requirements for Installing SQL Server 2012
-- https://bit.ly/1yRYXkQ

-- Using SQL Server in Windows 8 and later versions of Windows operating system 
-- https://bit.ly/2F7Ax0P



-- SQL Server NUMA Node information  (Query 13) (SQL Server NUMA Info)
SELECT node_id, node_state_desc, memory_node_id, processor_group, online_scheduler_count, 
       idle_scheduler_count, active_worker_count, avg_load_balance, resource_monitor_state
FROM sys.dm_os_nodes WITH (NOLOCK) 
WHERE node_state_desc <> N'ONLINE DAC' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some useful information about the composition and relative load on your NUMA nodes
-- You want to see an equal number of schedulers on each NUMA node
-- Watch out if SQL Server 2012 Standard Edition has been installed 
-- on a physical or virtual machine with more than four sockets or more than 16 physical cores

-- sys.dm_os_nodes (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pn5Mw8

-- Balancing Your Available SQL Server Core Licenses Evenly Across NUMA Nodes
-- https://bit.ly/2vfC4Rq



-- Good basic information about OS memory amounts and state  (Query 14) (System Memory)
SELECT total_physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Physical Memory (MB)], 
       available_physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Available Memory (MB)], 
       total_page_file_kb/1024 AS [Total Page File (MB)], 
	   available_page_file_kb/1024 AS [Available Page File (MB)], 
	   system_cache_kb/1024 AS [System Cache (MB)],
       system_memory_state_desc AS [System Memory State]
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_memory WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You want to see "Available physical memory is high" for System Memory State
-- This indicates that you are not under external memory pressure

-- Possible System Memory State values:
-- Available physical memory is high
-- Physical memory usage is steady
-- Available physical memory is low
-- Available physical memory is running low
-- Physical memory state is transitioning

-- sys.dm_os_sys_memory (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pcV0xq



-- You can skip the next two queries if you know you don't have a clustered instance


-- Get information about your cluster nodes and their status  (Query 15) (Cluster Node Properties)
-- (if your database server is in a failover cluster)
SELECT NodeName, status_description, is_current_owner
FROM sys.dm_os_cluster_nodes WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Knowing which node owns the cluster resources is critical
-- Especially when you are installing Windows or SQL Server updates
-- You will see no results if your instance is not clustered

-- Recommended hotfixes and updates for Windows Server 2012 R2-based failover clusters
-- https://bit.ly/1z5BfCw


-- Get information about any AlwaysOn AG cluster this instance is a part of (Query 16) (AlwaysOn AG Cluster)
SELECT cluster_name, quorum_type_desc, quorum_state_desc
FROM sys.dm_hadr_cluster WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You will see no results if your instance is not using AlwaysOn AGs



-- Hardware information from SQL Server 2012  (Query 17) (Hardware Info)
SELECT cpu_count AS [Logical CPU Count], scheduler_count, 
       hyperthread_ratio AS [Hyperthread Ratio],
       cpu_count/hyperthread_ratio AS [Physical CPU Count], 
       physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Physical Memory (MB)], 
	   committed_kb/1024 AS [Committed Memory (MB)],
       committed_target_kb/1024 AS [Committed Target Memory (MB)],
       max_workers_count AS [Max Workers Count], 
	   affinity_type_desc AS [Affinity Type], 
       sqlserver_start_time AS [SQL Server Start Time], 
	   virtual_machine_type_desc AS [Virtual Machine Type]
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some good basic hardware information about your database server
-- Cannot distinguish between HT and multi-core
-- Note: virtual_machine_type_desc of HYPERVISOR does not automatically mean you are running SQL Server inside of a VM
-- It merely indicates that you have a hypervisor running on your host

-- sys.dm_os_sys_info (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2pczOYs


-- Get System Manufacturer and model number from SQL Server Error log (Query 18) (System Manufacturer)
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'Manufacturer';
------ 

-- This can help you determine the capabilities and capacities of your database server
-- Can also be used to confirm if you are running in a VM
-- This query might take a few seconds if you have not recycled your error log recently
-- This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was started


-- Get BIOS date from Windows Registry (Query 19) (BIOS Date)
EXEC sys.xp_instance_regread N'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE', N'HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\BIOS', N'BiosReleaseDate';
------

-- Helps you understand whether the main system BIOS is up to date, and the possible age of the hardware
-- Not as useful for virtualization


-- Get processor description from Windows Registry  (Query 20) (Processor Description)
EXEC sys.xp_instance_regread N'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE', N'HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\CentralProcessor\0', N'ProcessorNameString';
------

-- Gives you the model number and rated clock speed of your processor(s)
-- Your processors may be running at less than the rated clock speed due
-- to the Windows Power Plan or hardware power management

-- You can use CPU-Z to get your actual CPU core speed and a lot of other useful information
-- https://bit.ly/QhR6xF

-- You can learn more about processor selection for SQL Server by following this link
-- https://bit.ly/2F3aVlP



-- Get information on location, time and size of any memory dumps from SQL Server  (Query 21) (Memory Dump Info)
SELECT [filename], creation_time, size_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS [Size (MB)]
FROM sys.dm_server_memory_dumps WITH (NOLOCK) 
ORDER BY creation_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This will not return any rows if you have 
-- not had any memory dumps (which is a good thing)

-- sys.dm_server_memory_dumps (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2elwWll



-- Look at Suspect Pages table (Query 22) (Suspect Pages)
SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name], [file_id], page_id, 
       event_type, error_count, last_update_date 
FROM msdb.dbo.suspect_pages WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY database_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- event_type value descriptions
-- 1 = 823 error caused by an operating system CRC error
--     or 824 error other than a bad checksum or a torn page (for example, a bad page ID)
-- 2 = Bad checksum
-- 3 = Torn page
-- 4 = Restored (The page was restored after it was marked bad)
-- 5 = Repaired (DBCC repaired the page)
-- 7 = Deallocated by DBCC

-- Ideally, this query returns no results. The table is limited to 1000 rows.
-- If you do get results here, you should do further investigation to determine the root cause

-- Manage the suspect_pages Table
-- https://bit.ly/2Fvr1c9


-- Get number of data files in tempdb database (Query 23) (Tempdb Data Files)
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'The tempdb database has';
------

-- Get the number of data files in the tempdb database
-- 4-8 data files that are all the same size is a good starting point
-- This query will return no results if your error log has been recycled since the instance was last started
-- This will be blank unless you have Service Pack 4 or later


-- File names and paths for all user and system databases on instance  (Query 24) (Database Filenames and Paths)
SELECT DB_NAME([database_id]) AS [Database Name], 
       [file_id], [name], physical_name, [type_desc], state_desc,
	   is_percent_growth, growth,
	   CONVERT(bigint, growth/128.0) AS [Growth in MB], 
       CONVERT(bigint, size/128.0) AS [Total Size in MB]
FROM sys.master_files WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY DB_NAME([database_id]), [file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Things to look at:
-- Are data files and log files on different drives?
-- Is everything on the C: drive?
-- Is tempdb on dedicated drives?
-- Is there only one tempdb data file?
-- Are all of the tempdb data files the same size?
-- Are there multiple data files for user databases?
-- Is percent growth enabled for any files (which is bad)?


-- Volume info for all LUNS that have database files on the current instance (Query 25) (Volume Info)
SELECT DISTINCT vs.volume_mount_point, vs.file_system_type, vs.logical_volume_name, 
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.total_bytes/1073741824.0) AS [Total Size (GB)],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.available_bytes/1073741824.0) AS [Available Size (GB)],  
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), vs.available_bytes * 1. / vs.total_bytes * 100.) AS [Space Free %],
vs.supports_compression, vs.is_compressed, 
vs.supports_sparse_files, vs.supports_alternate_streams
FROM sys.master_files AS f WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_os_volume_stats(f.database_id, f.[file_id]) AS vs 
ORDER BY vs.volume_mount_point OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Shows you the total and free space on the LUNs where you have database files
-- Being low on free space can negatively affect performance

-- sys.dm_os_volume_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://bit.ly/2oBPNNr



-- Drive level latency information (Query 26) (Drive Level Latency)
-- Based on code from Jimmy May
SELECT tab.[Drive], tab.volume_mount_point AS [Volume Mount Point], 
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_reads = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall_read_ms/num_of_reads) 
	END AS [Read Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_writes = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall_write_ms/num_of_writes) 
	END AS [Write Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN (num_of_reads = 0 AND num_of_writes = 0) THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall/(num_of_reads + num_of_writes)) 
	END AS [Overall Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_reads = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (num_of_bytes_read/num_of_reads) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Read],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_writes = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (num_of_bytes_written/num_of_writes) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Write],
	CASE 
		WHEN (num_of_reads = 0 AND num_of_writes = 0) THEN 0 
		ELSE ((num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/(num_of_reads + num_of_writes)) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Transfer]
FROM (SELECT LEFT(UPPER(mf.physical_name), 2) AS Drive, SUM(num_of_reads) AS num_of_reads,
	         SUM(io_stall_read_ms) AS io_stall_read_ms, SUM(num_of_writes) AS num_of_writes,
	         SUM(io_stall_write_ms) AS io_stall_write_ms, SUM(num_of_bytes_read) AS num_of_bytes_read,
	         SUM(num_of_bytes_written) AS num_of_bytes_written, SUM(io_stall) AS io_stall, vs.volume_mount_point 
      FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS vfs
      INNER JOIN sys.master_files AS mf WITH (NOLOCK)
      ON vfs.database_id = mf.database_id AND vfs.file_id = mf.file_id
	  CROSS APPLY sys.dm_os_volume_stats(mf.database_id, mf.[file_id]) AS vs 
      GROUP BY LEFT(UPPER(mf.physical_name), 2), vs.volume_mount_point) AS tab
ORDER BY [Overall Latency] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Shows you the drive-level latency for reads and writes, in milliseconds
-- Latency above 30-40ms is usually a problem
-- These latency numbers include all file activity against all SQL Server 
-- database files on each drive since SQL Server was last started


-- Calculates average stalls per read, per write, and per total input/output for each database file  (Query 27) (IO Stalls by File)
SELECT DB_NAME(fs.database_id) AS [Database Name], CAST(fs.io_stall_read_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_read_stall_ms],
CAST(fs.io_stall_write_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_write_stall_ms],
CAST((fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms)/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_io_stall_ms],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), mf.size/128.0) AS [File Size (MB)], mf.physical_name, mf.type_desc, fs.io_stall_read_ms, fs.num_of_reads, 
fs.io_stall_write_ms, fs.num_of_writes, fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms AS [io_stalls], fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes AS [total_io]
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(null,null) AS fs
INNER JOIN sys.master_files AS mf WITH (NOLOCK)
ON fs.database_id = mf.database_id
AND fs.[file_id] = mf.[file_id]
ORDER BY avg_io_stall_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database files on the entire instance have the most I/O bottlenecks
-- This can help you decide whether certain LUNs are overloaded and whether you might
-- want to move some files to a different location or perhaps improve your I/O performance
-- These latency numbers include all file activity against each SQL Server 
-- database file since SQL Server was last started


-- Look for I/O requests taking longer than 15 seconds in the six most recent SQL Server Error Logs (Query 28) (IO Warnings)
CREATE TABLE #IOWarningResults(LogDate datetime, ProcessInfo sysname, LogText nvarchar(1000));

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 1, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 2, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 3, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 4, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 5, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

SELECT LogDate, ProcessInfo, LogText
FROM #IOWarningResults
ORDER BY LogDate DESC;

DROP TABLE #IOWarningResults;
------  

-- Finding 15 second I/O warnings in the SQL Server Error Log is useful evidence of
-- poor I/O performance (which might have many different causes)
-- Look to see if you see any patterns in the results (same files, same drives, same time of day, etc.)

-- Diagnostics in SQL Server help detect stalled and stuck I/O operations
-- https://bit.ly/2qtaw73



-- Recovery model, log reuse wait description, log file size, log usage size  (Query 29) (Database Properties)
-- and compatibility level for all databases on instance
SELECT db.[name] AS [Database Name], SUSER_SNAME(db.owner_sid) AS [Database Owner], db.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model], 
db.state_desc, db.containment_desc, db.log_reuse_wait_desc AS [Log Reuse Wait Description], 
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), ls.cntr_value/1024.0) AS [Log Size (MB)], CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), lu.cntr_value/1024.0) AS [Log Used (MB)],
CAST(CAST(lu.cntr_value AS FLOAT) / CAST(ls.cntr_value AS FLOAT)AS DECIMAL(18,2)) * 100 AS [Log Used %], 
db.[compatibility_level] AS [DB Compatibility Level], db.page_verify_option_desc AS [Page Verify Option], 
db.is_auto_create_stats_on, db.is_auto_update_stats_on, db.is_auto_update_stats_async_on, db.is_parameterization_forced, 
db.snapshot_isolation_state_desc, db.is_read_committed_snapshot_on, db.is_auto_close_on, db.is_auto_shrink_on, 
db.target_recovery_time_in_seconds, db.is_cdc_enabled, db.is_published, db.group_database_id, db.replica_id,
db.is_encrypted, de.encryption_state, de.percent_complete, de.key_algorithm, de.key_length
FROM sys.databases AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS lu WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.name = lu.instance_name
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS ls WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.name = ls.instance_name
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_database_encryption_keys AS de WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.database_id = de.database_id
WHERE lu.counter_name LIKE N'Log File(s) Used Size (KB)%' 
AND ls.counter_name LIKE N'Log File(s) Size (KB)%'
AND ls.cntr_value > 0 
ORDER BY db.[name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Things to look at:
-- How many databases are on the instance?
-- What recovery models are they using?
-- What is the log reuse wait description?
-- How full are the transaction logs?
-- What compatibility level are the databases on? 
-- What is the Page Verify Option? (should be CHECKSUM)
-- Is Auto Update Statistics Asynchronously enabled?
-- Make sure auto_shrink and auto_close are not enabled!



-- Missing Indexes for all databases by Index Advantage  (Query 30) (Missing Indexes All Databases)
SELECT CONVERT(decimal(18,2), user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01)) AS [index_advantage],
FORMAT(migs.last_user_seek, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss') AS [last_user_seek], 
mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement]) AS [missing_indexes_for_table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement], equality_columns) AS [similar_missing_indexes_for_table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, 
CONVERT(decimal(18,2), migs.avg_total_user_cost) AS [avg_total_user_cost], migs.avg_user_impact 
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Getting missing index information for all of the databases on the instance is very useful
-- Look at last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
-- Also look at avg_user_impact and avg_total_user_cost to help determine importance
-- SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware
-- Do not just blindly add indexes that show up from this query!!!

-- SQL Server Index Design Guide
-- https://bit.ly/2qtZr4N



-- Get VLF Counts for all databases on the instance (Query 31) (VLF Counts)
-- (adapted from Michelle Ufford) 
CREATE TABLE #VLFInfo (RecoveryUnitID int, FileID  int,
					   FileSize bigint, StartOffset bigint,
					   FSeqNo      bigint, [Status]    bigint,
					   Parity      bigint, CreateLSN   numeric(38));
	 
CREATE TABLE #VLFCountResults(DatabaseName sysname, VLFCount int);
	 
EXEC sp_MSforeachdb N'Use [?]; 

				INSERT INTO #VLFInfo 
				EXEC sp_executesql N''DBCC LOGINFO([?])''; 
	 
				INSERT INTO #VLFCountResults 
				SELECT DB_NAME(), COUNT(*) 
				FROM #VLFInfo; 

				TRUNCATE TABLE #VLFInfo;'
	 
SELECT DatabaseName, VLFCount  
FROM #VLFCountResults
ORDER BY VLFCount DESC;
	 
DROP TABLE #VLFInfo;
DROP TABLE #VLFCountResults;
------

-- High VLF counts can affect write performance to the log file 
-- and they can make full database restores and crash recovery take much longer
-- Try to keep your VLF counts under 200 in most cases (depending on log file size)



-- Get CPU utilization by database (Query 32) (CPU Usage by Database)
WITH DB_CPU_Stats
AS
(SELECT pa.DatabaseID, DB_Name(pa.DatabaseID) AS [Database Name], SUM(qs.total_worker_time/1000) AS [CPU_Time_Ms]
 FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
 CROSS APPLY (SELECT CONVERT(int, value) AS [DatabaseID] 
              FROM sys.dm_exec_plan_attributes(qs.plan_handle)
              WHERE attribute = N'dbid') AS pa
 GROUP BY DatabaseID)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY [CPU_Time_Ms] DESC) AS [CPU Rank],
       [Database Name], [CPU_Time_Ms] AS [CPU Time (ms)], 
       CAST([CPU_Time_Ms] * 1.0 / SUM([CPU_Time_Ms]) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5, 2)) AS [CPU Percent]
FROM DB_CPU_Stats
WHERE DatabaseID <> 32767 -- ResourceDB
ORDER BY [CPU Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database is using the most CPU resources on the instance


-- Get I/O utilization by database (Query 33) (IO Usage By Database)
WITH Aggregate_IO_Statistics
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(SUM(num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/1048576 AS DECIMAL(12, 2)) AS io_in_mb
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS [DM_IO_STATS]
GROUP BY database_id)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY io_in_mb DESC) AS [I/O Rank], [Database Name], io_in_mb AS [Total I/O (MB)],
       CAST(io_in_mb/ SUM(io_in_mb) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [I/O Percent]
FROM Aggregate_IO_Statistics
ORDER BY [I/O Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database is using the most I/O resources on the instance


-- Get total buffer usage by database for current instance  (Query 34) (Total Buffer Usage by Database)
-- This make take some time to run on a busy instance
WITH AggregateBufferPoolUsage
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(COUNT(*) * 8/1024.0 AS DECIMAL (10,2))  AS [CachedSize]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE database_id <> 32767 -- ResourceDB
GROUP BY DB_NAME(database_id))
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY CachedSize DESC) AS [Buffer Pool Rank], [Database Name], CachedSize AS [Cached Size (MB)],
       CAST(CachedSize / SUM(CachedSize) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [Buffer Pool Percent]
FROM AggregateBufferPoolUsage
ORDER BY [Buffer Pool Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you how much memory (in the buffer pool) 
-- is being used by each database on the instance


-- Clear Wait Stats with this command
-- DBCC SQLPERF('sys.dm_os_wait_stats', CLEAR);

-- Isolate top waits for server instance since last restart or wait statistics clear  (Query 35) (Top Waits)
WITH [Waits] 
AS (SELECT wait_type, wait_time_ms/ 1000.0 AS [WaitS],
          (wait_time_ms - signal_wait_time_ms) / 1000.0 AS [ResourceS],
           signal_wait_time_ms / 1000.0 AS [SignalS],
           waiting_tasks_count AS [WaitCount],
           100.0 *  wait_time_ms / SUM (wait_time_ms) OVER() AS [Percentage],
           ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY wait_time_ms DESC) AS [RowNum]
    FROM sys.dm_os_wait_stats WITH (NOLOCK)
    WHERE [wait_type] NOT IN (
        N'BROKER_EVENTHANDLER', N'BROKER_RECEIVE_WAITFOR', N'BROKER_TASK_STOP',
		N'BROKER_TO_FLUSH', N'BROKER_TRANSMITTER', N'CHECKPOINT_QUEUE',
        N'CHKPT', N'CLR_AUTO_EVENT', N'CLR_MANUAL_EVENT', N'CLR_SEMAPHORE',
        N'DBMIRROR_DBM_EVENT', N'DBMIRROR_EVENTS_QUEUE', N'DBMIRROR_WORKER_QUEUE',
		N'DBMIRRORING_CMD', N'DIRTY_PAGE_POLL', N'DISPATCHER_QUEUE_SEMAPHORE',
        N'EXECSYNC', N'FSAGENT', N'FT_IFTS_SCHEDULER_IDLE_WAIT', N'FT_IFTSHC_MUTEX',
        N'HADR_CLUSAPI_CALL', N'HADR_FILESTREAM_IOMGR_IOCOMPLETION', N'HADR_LOGCAPTURE_WAIT', 
		N'HADR_NOTIFICATION_DEQUEUE', N'HADR_TIMER_TASK', N'HADR_WORK_QUEUE',
        N'KSOURCE_WAKEUP', N'LAZYWRITER_SLEEP', N'LOGMGR_QUEUE', N'ONDEMAND_TASK_QUEUE',
        N'PREEMPTIVE_OS_QUERYREGISTRY', 
		N'PREEMPTIVE_HADR_LEASE_MECHANISM', N'PREEMPTIVE_SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS',
		N'PWAIT_ALL_COMPONENTS_INITIALIZED', 
		N'QDS_PERSIST_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP',
        N'QDS_CLEANUP_STALE_QUERIES_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP', N'REQUEST_FOR_DEADLOCK_SEARCH',
		N'RESOURCE_QUEUE', N'SERVER_IDLE_CHECK', N'SLEEP_BPOOL_FLUSH', N'SLEEP_DBSTARTUP',
		N'SLEEP_DCOMSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_MASTERDBREADY', N'SLEEP_MASTERMDREADY',
        N'SLEEP_MASTERUPGRADED', N'SLEEP_MSDBSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_SYSTEMTASK', N'SLEEP_TASK',
        N'SLEEP_TEMPDBSTARTUP', N'SNI_HTTP_ACCEPT', N'SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS_SLEEP',
		N'SQLTRACE_BUFFER_FLUSH', N'SQLTRACE_INCREMENTAL_FLUSH_SLEEP', N'SQLTRACE_WAIT_ENTRIES',
		N'WAIT_FOR_RESULTS', N'WAITFOR', N'WAITFOR_TASKSHUTDOWN', N'WAIT_XTP_HOST_WAIT',
		N'WAIT_XTP_OFFLINE_CKPT_NEW_LOG', N'WAIT_XTP_CKPT_CLOSE', N'XE_DISPATCHER_JOIN',
        N'XE_DISPATCHER_WAIT', N'XE_TIMER_EVENT')
    AND waiting_tasks_count > 0)
SELECT
    MAX (W1.wait_type) AS [WaitType],
	CAST (MAX (W1.Percentage) AS DECIMAL (5,2)) AS [Wait Percentage],
	CAST ((MAX (W1.WaitS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgWait_Sec],
    CAST ((MAX (W1.ResourceS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgRes_Sec],
    CAST ((MAX (W1.SignalS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgSig_Sec], 
    CAST (MAX (W1.WaitS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Wait_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.ResourceS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Resource_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.SignalS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Signal_Sec],
    MAX (W1.WaitCount) AS [Wait Count],
	CAST (N'https://www.sqlskills.com/help/waits/' + W1.wait_type AS XML) AS [Help/Info URL]
FROM Waits AS W1
INNER JOIN Waits AS W2
ON W2.RowNum <= W1.RowNum
GROUP BY W1.RowNum, W1.wait_type
HAVING SUM (W2.Percentage) - MAX (W1.Percentage) < 99 -- percentage threshold
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Cumulative wait stats are not as useful on an idle instance that is not under load or performance pressure

-- SQL Server Wait Types Library (Paul Randal)
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/help/waits/

-- The SQL Server Wait Type Repository
-- http://blogs.msdn.com/b/psssql/archive/2009/11/03/the-sql-server-wait-type-repository.aspx

-- Wait statistics, or please tell me where it hurts
-- http://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/paul/wait-statistics-or-please-tell-me-where-it-hurts/

-- SQL Server 2005 Performance Tuning using the Waits and Queues
-- http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc966413.aspx

-- sys.dm_os_wait_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms179984(v=sql.120).aspx



-- Get a count of SQL connections by IP address (Query 36) (Connection Counts by IP Address)
SELECT ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name, 
COUNT(ec.session_id) AS [connection count] 
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions AS es WITH (NOLOCK) 
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_connections AS ec WITH (NOLOCK) 
ON es.session_id = ec.session_id 
GROUP BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name  
ORDER BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you figure where your database load is coming from
-- and verifies connectivity from other machines

-- Solving Connectivity errors to SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2EgzoD0



-- Get Average Task Counts (run multiple times)  (Query 37) (Avg Task Counts)
SELECT AVG(current_tasks_count) AS [Avg Task Count], 
AVG(work_queue_count) AS [Avg Work Queue Count],
AVG(runnable_tasks_count) AS [Avg Runnable Task Count],
AVG(pending_disk_io_count) AS [Avg Pending DiskIO Count]
FROM sys.dm_os_schedulers WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE scheduler_id < 255 OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Sustained values above 10 suggest further investigation in that area
-- High Avg Task Counts are often caused by blocking/deadlocking or other resource contention

-- Sustained values above 1 suggest further investigation in that area
-- High Avg Runnable Task Counts are a good sign of CPU pressure
-- High Avg Pending DiskIO Counts are a sign of disk pressure

-- How to Do Some Very Basic SQL Server Monitoring
-- https://bit.ly/2q3Btgt



-- Detect blocking (run multiple times)  (Query 38) (Detect Blocking)
SELECT t1.resource_type AS [lock type], DB_NAME(resource_database_id) AS [database],
t1.resource_associated_entity_id AS [blk object],t1.request_mode AS [lock req],  -- lock requested
t1.request_session_id AS [waiter sid], t2.wait_duration_ms AS [wait time],       -- spid of waiter  
(SELECT [text] FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r WITH (NOLOCK)                      -- get sql for waiter
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.[sql_handle]) 
WHERE r.session_id = t1.request_session_id) AS [waiter_batch],
(SELECT SUBSTRING(qt.[text],r.statement_start_offset/2, 
    (CASE WHEN r.statement_end_offset = -1 
    THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 
    ELSE r.statement_end_offset END - r.statement_start_offset)/2) 
FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.[sql_handle]) AS qt
WHERE r.session_id = t1.request_session_id) AS [waiter_stmt],					-- statement blocked
t2.blocking_session_id AS [blocker sid],										-- spid of blocker
(SELECT [text] FROM sys.sysprocesses AS p										-- get sql for blocker
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(p.[sql_handle]) 
WHERE p.spid = t2.blocking_session_id) AS [blocker_batch]
FROM sys.dm_tran_locks AS t1 WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_waiting_tasks AS t2 WITH (NOLOCK)
ON t1.lock_owner_address = t2.resource_address OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps troubleshoot blocking and deadlocking issues
-- The results will change from second to second on a busy system
-- You should run this query multiple times when you see signs of blocking



-- Get CPU Utilization History for last 256 minutes (in one minute intervals)  (Query 39) (CPU Utilization History)
DECLARE @ts_now bigint = (SELECT cpu_ticks/(cpu_ticks/ms_ticks) FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info WITH (NOLOCK)); 

SELECT TOP(256) SQLProcessUtilization AS [SQL Server Process CPU Utilization], 
               SystemIdle AS [System Idle Process], 
               100 - SystemIdle - SQLProcessUtilization AS [Other Process CPU Utilization], 
               DATEADD(ms, -1 * (@ts_now - [timestamp]), GETDATE()) AS [Event Time] 
FROM (SELECT record.value('(./Record/@id)[1]', 'int') AS record_id, 
			record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/SystemIdle)[1]', 'int') 
			AS [SystemIdle], 
			record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/ProcessUtilization)[1]', 'int') 
			AS [SQLProcessUtilization], [timestamp] 
	  FROM (SELECT [timestamp], CONVERT(xml, record) AS [record] 
			FROM sys.dm_os_ring_buffers WITH (NOLOCK)
			WHERE ring_buffer_type = N'RING_BUFFER_SCHEDULER_MONITOR' 
			AND record LIKE N'%<SystemHealth>%') AS x) AS y 
ORDER BY record_id DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at the trend over the entire period 
-- Also look at high sustained 'Other Process' CPU Utilization values
-- Note: This query sometimes gives inaccurate results (negative values)
-- on high core count (> 64 cores) systems


-- Get top total worker time queries for entire instance (Query 40) (Top Worker Time Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], 
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 255), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text],  
qs.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time], qs.min_worker_time AS [Min Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.max_worker_time AS [Max Worker Time], 
qs.min_elapsed_time AS [Min Elapsed Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time AS [Max Elapsed Time],
qs.min_logical_reads AS [Min Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.max_logical_reads AS [Max Logical Reads], 
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Helps you find the most expensive queries from a CPU perspective across the entire instance
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues



-- Page Life Expectancy (PLE) value for each NUMA node in current instance  (Query 41) (PLE by NUMA Node)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], RTRIM([object_name]) AS [Object Name], instance_name, cntr_value AS [Page Life Expectancy]
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N'%Buffer Node%' -- Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N'Page life expectancy' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- PLE is a good measurement of internal memory pressure
-- Higher PLE is better. Watch the trend over time, not the absolute value
-- This will only return one row for non-NUMA systems

-- Page Life Expectancy isn�t what you think�
-- https://bit.ly/2EgynLa


-- Memory Grants Pending value for current instance  (Query 42) (Memory Grants Pending)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], RTRIM([object_name]) AS [Object Name], cntr_value AS [Memory Grants Pending]                                                                                                       
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N'%Memory Manager%' -- Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N'Memory Grants Pending' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Run multiple times, and run periodically if you suspect you are under memory pressure
-- Memory Grants Pending above zero for a sustained period is a very strong indicator of internal memory pressure


-- Memory Clerk Usage for instance  (Query 43) (Memory Clerk Usage)
-- Look for high value for CACHESTORE_SQLCP (Ad-hoc query plans)
SELECT TOP(10) mc.[type] AS [Memory Clerk Type], 
       CAST((SUM(mc.pages_kb)/1024.0) AS DECIMAL (15,2)) AS [Memory Usage (MB)] 
FROM sys.dm_os_memory_clerks AS mc WITH (NOLOCK)
GROUP BY mc.[type]  
ORDER BY SUM(mc.pages_kb) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- MEMORYCLERK_SQLBUFFERPOOL was new for SQL Server 2012. It should be your highest consumer of memory

-- CACHESTORE_SQLCP  SQL Plans         
-- These are cached SQL statements or batches that aren't in stored procedures, functions and triggers
-- Watch out for high values for CACHESTORE_SQLCP
-- Enabling 'optimize for ad hoc workloads' at the instance level can help reduce this
-- Running DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE ('SQL Plans') periodically may be required to better control this

-- CACHESTORE_OBJCP  Object Plans      
-- These are compiled plans for stored procedures, functions and triggers



-- Find single-use, ad-hoc and prepared queries that are bloating the plan cache  (Query 44) (Ad hoc Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], t.[text] AS [Query Text], 
cp.objtype AS [Object Type], cp.cacheobjtype AS [Cache Object Type],  
cp.size_in_bytes/1024 AS [Plan Size in KB]
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t
WHERE cp.cacheobjtype = N'Compiled Plan' 
AND cp.objtype IN (N'Adhoc', N'Prepared') 
AND cp.usecounts = 1
ORDER BY cp.size_in_bytes DESC, DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you the text, type and size of single-use ad-hoc and prepared queries that waste space in the plan cache
-- Enabling 'optimize for ad hoc workloads' for the instance can help (SQL Server 2008 and above only)
-- Running DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE ('SQL Plans') periodically may be required to better control this
-- Enabling forced parameterization for the database can help, but test first!

-- Plan cache, adhoc workloads and clearing the single-use plan cache bloat
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/kimberly/plan-cache-adhoc-workloads-and-clearing-the-single-use-plan-cache-bloat/


-- Get top total logical reads queries for entire instance (Query 45) (Top Logical Reads Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name],
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 255), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text], 
qs.total_logical_reads AS [Total Logical Reads],
qs.min_logical_reads AS [Min Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.max_logical_reads AS [Max Logical Reads],   
qs.min_worker_time AS [Min Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.max_worker_time AS [Max Worker Time], 
qs.min_elapsed_time AS [Min Elapsed Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time AS [Max Elapsed Time],
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count], 
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Helps you find the most expensive queries from a memory perspective across the entire instance
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues


-- Get top average elapsed time queries for entire instance (Query 46) (Top Avg Elapsed Time Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], 
REPLACE(REPLACE(LEFT(t.[text], 255), CHAR(10),''), CHAR(13),'') AS [Short Query Text],  
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
qs.min_elapsed_time, qs.max_elapsed_time, qs.last_elapsed_time,
qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],  
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads], 
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Physical Reads], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you find the highest average elapsed time queries across the entire instance
-- Can also help track down parameter sniffing issues




-- Database specific queries *****************************************************************

-- **** Please switch to a user database that you are interested in! *****
--USE YourDatabaseName; -- make sure to change to an actual database on your instance, not the master system database
--GO

-- Individual File Sizes and space available for current database  (Query 47) (File Sizes and Space)
SELECT f.name AS [File Name] , f.physical_name AS [Physical Name], 
CAST((f.size/128.0) AS DECIMAL(15,2)) AS [Total Size in MB],
CAST(f.size/128.0 - CAST(FILEPROPERTY(f.name, 'SpaceUsed') AS int)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(15,2)) 
AS [Available Space In MB], f.[file_id], fg.name AS [Filegroup Name],
f.is_percent_growth, f.growth, fg.is_default, fg.is_read_only
FROM sys.database_files AS f WITH (NOLOCK) 
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.filegroups AS fg WITH (NOLOCK)
ON f.data_space_id = fg.data_space_id
ORDER BY f.[file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at how large and how full the files are and where they are located
-- Make sure the transaction log is not full!!


-- I/O Statistics by file for the current database  (Query 48) (IO Stats By File)
SELECT DB_NAME(DB_ID()) AS [Database Name], df.name AS [Logical Name], vfs.[file_id], df.type_desc,
df.physical_name AS [Physical Name], CAST(vfs.size_on_disk_bytes/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Size on Disk (MB)],
vfs.num_of_reads, vfs.num_of_writes, vfs.io_stall_read_ms, vfs.io_stall_write_ms,
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_read_ms/(vfs.io_stall_read_ms + vfs.io_stall_write_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_write_ms/(vfs.io_stall_write_ms + vfs.io_stall_read_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Writes Pct],
(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS [Writes + Reads], 
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_read/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Read], 
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_written/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Written],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_reads/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_writes/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Write Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_read/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Read Bytes Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_written/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Written Bytes Pct]
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(DB_ID(), NULL) AS vfs
INNER JOIN sys.database_files AS df WITH (NOLOCK)
ON vfs.[file_id]= df.[file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you characterize your workload better from an I/O perspective for this database
-- It helps you determine whether you has an OLTP or DW/DSS type of workload



-- Get most frequently executed queries for this database (Query 49) (Query Execution Counts)
SELECT TOP(50) LEFT(t.[text], 50) AS [Short Query Text], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
qs.total_logical_reads AS [Total Logical Reads],
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
qs.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time AS [Total Elapsed Time],
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
--,t.[text] AS [Complete Query Text], qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- uncomment out these columns if not copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
WHERE t.dbid = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Queries 50 through 55 are the "Bad Man List" for stored procedures
-- Top Cached SPs By Execution Count (Query 50) (SP Execution Counts)
SELECT TOP(100) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time],    
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you which cached stored procedures are called the most often
-- This helps you characterize and baseline your workload


-- Top Cached SPs By Avg Elapsed Time (Query 51) (SP Avg Elapsed Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.min_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time], 
qs.max_elapsed_time, qs.last_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], 
qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY avg_elapsed_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find high average elapsed time cached stored procedures that
-- may be easy to optimize with standard query tuning techniques



-- Top Cached SPs By Total Worker time. Worker time relates to CPU cost  (Query 52) (SP Worker Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a CPU perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of CPU pressure


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Reads. Logical reads relate to memory pressure  (Query 53) (SP Logical Reads)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_reads AS [TotalLogicalReads], 
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalReads],qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute], 
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a memory perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of memory pressure


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Physical Reads. Physical reads relate to disk read I/O pressure  (Query 54) (SP Physical Reads)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name],qs.total_physical_reads AS [TotalPhysicalReads], 
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgPhysicalReads], qs.execution_count, 
qs.total_logical_reads,qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index],
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan 
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND qs.total_physical_reads > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_physical_reads DESC, qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a read I/O perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of I/O pressure or of memory pressure


       
-- Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Writes (Query 55) (SP Logical Writes)
-- Logical writes relate to both memory and disk I/O pressure 
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_writes AS [TotalLogicalWrites], 
qs.total_logical_writes/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalWrites], qs.execution_count,
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
CASE WHEN CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qp.query_plan) LIKE N'%<MissingIndexes>%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS [Has Missing Index], 
FORMAT(qs.last_execution_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Last Execution Time], 
FORMAT(qs.cached_time, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss', 'en-US') AS [Plan Cached Time]
-- ,qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- Uncomment if you want the Query Plan 
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(qs.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND qs.total_logical_writes > 0
AND DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()) > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_writes DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a write I/O perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of I/O pressure or of memory pressure


-- Lists the top statements by average input/output usage for the current database  (Query 56) (Top IO Statements)
SELECT TOP(50) OBJECT_NAME(qt.objectid, dbid) AS [SP Name],
(qs.total_logical_reads + qs.total_logical_writes) /qs.execution_count AS [Avg IO], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
SUBSTRING(qt.[text],qs.statement_start_offset/2, 
	(CASE 
		WHEN qs.statement_end_offset = -1 
	 THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 
		ELSE qs.statement_end_offset 
	 END - qs.statement_start_offset)/2) AS [Query Text]	
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) AS qt
WHERE qt.[dbid] = DB_ID()
ORDER BY [Avg IO] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you find the most expensive statements for I/O by SP



-- Possible Bad NC Indexes (writes > reads)  (Query 57) (Bad NC Indexes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(s.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], i.name AS [Index Name], i.index_id, 
i.is_disabled, i.is_hypothetical, i.has_filter, i.fill_factor,
s.user_updates AS [Total Writes], s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads],
s.user_updates - (s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups) AS [Difference]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(s.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
AND s.user_updates > (s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups)
AND i.index_id > 1 AND i.[type_desc] = N'NONCLUSTERED'
AND i.is_primary_key = 0 AND i.is_unique_constraint = 0 AND i.is_unique = 0
ORDER BY [Difference] DESC, [Total Writes] DESC, [Total Reads] ASC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look for indexes with high numbers of writes and zero or very low numbers of reads
-- Consider your complete workload, and how long your instance has been running
-- Investigate further before dropping an index!


-- Missing Indexes for current database by Index Advantage  (Query 58) (Missing Indexes)
SELECT CONVERT(decimal(18,2), user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01)) AS [index_advantage], 
migs.last_user_seek, mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement]) AS [missing_indexes_for_table],
COUNT(1) OVER(PARTITION BY mid.[statement], equality_columns) AS [similar_missing_indexes_for_table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, 
CONVERT(decimal(18,2), migs.avg_total_user_cost) AS [avg_total_user_cost], migs.avg_user_impact,
OBJECT_NAME(mid.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], p.rows AS [Table Rows]
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = mid.[object_id]
WHERE mid.database_id = DB_ID()
AND p.index_id < 2 
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at index advantage, last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
-- SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware
-- Do not just blindly add indexes that show up from this query!!!


-- Find missing index warnings for cached plans in the current database  (Query 59) (Missing Index Warnings)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a busy instance
SELECT TOP(25) OBJECT_NAME(objectid) AS [ObjectName], 
               cp.objtype, cp.usecounts, cp.size_in_bytes, query_plan
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(cp.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE CAST(query_plan AS NVARCHAR(MAX)) LIKE N'%MissingIndex%'
AND dbid = DB_ID()
ORDER BY cp.usecounts DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you connect missing indexes to specific stored procedures or queries
-- This can help you decide whether to add them or not


-- Breaks down buffers used by current database by object (table, index) in the buffer cache  (Query 60) (Buffer Usage)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a busy instance
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) AS [Object Name], p.index_id, 
CAST(COUNT(*)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Buffer size(MB)],  
COUNT(*) AS [BufferCount], p.[Rows] AS [Row Count],
p.data_compression_desc AS [Compression Type]
FROM sys.allocation_units AS a WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors AS b WITH (NOLOCK)
ON a.allocation_unit_id = b.allocation_unit_id
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON a.container_id = p.hobt_id
WHERE b.database_id = CONVERT(int, DB_ID())
AND p.[object_id] > 100
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'plan_%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'xml_index_nodes%'
GROUP BY p.[object_id], p.index_id, p.data_compression_desc, p.[Rows]
ORDER BY [BufferCount] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you what tables and indexes are using the most memory in the buffer cache
-- It can help identify possible candidates for data compression


-- Get Table names, row counts, and compression status for clustered index or heap  (Query 61) (Table Sizes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS [ObjectName], 
SUM(Rows) AS [RowCount], data_compression_desc AS [CompressionType]
FROM sys.partitions WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE index_id < 2 --ignore the partitions from the non-clustered index if any
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'queue_%' 
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'filestream_tombstone%' 
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'fulltext%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'ifts_comp_fragment%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'filetable_updates%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'xml_index_nodes%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'sqlagent_job%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'plan_persist%'
GROUP BY object_id, data_compression_desc
ORDER BY SUM(Rows) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you an idea of table sizes, and possible data compression opportunities



-- Get some key table properties (Query 62) (Table Properties)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], p.[rows] AS [Table Rows], p.index_id, 
       p.data_compression_desc AS [Index Data Compression],
       t.create_date, t.lock_on_bulk_load, t.is_replicated, t.has_replication_filter, 
       t.is_tracked_by_cdc, t.lock_escalation_desc, t.is_filetable
FROM sys.tables AS t WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON t.[object_id] = p.[object_id]
WHERE OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
ORDER BY OBJECT_NAME(t.[object_id]), p.index_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some good information about your tables



-- When were Statistics last updated on all indexes?  (Query 63) (Statistics Update)
SELECT SCHEMA_NAME(o.Schema_ID) + N'.' + o.NAME AS [Object Name], o.type_desc AS [Object Type],
      i.name AS [Index Name], STATS_DATE(i.[object_id], i.index_id) AS [Statistics Date], 
      s.auto_created, s.no_recompute, s.user_created, s.is_temporary,
	  st.row_count, st.used_page_count
FROM sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON o.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id] 
AND i.index_id = s.stats_id
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_partition_stats AS st WITH (NOLOCK)
ON o.[object_id] = st.[object_id]
AND i.[index_id] = st.[index_id]
WHERE o.[type] IN ('U', 'V')
AND st.row_count > 0
ORDER BY STATS_DATE(i.[object_id], i.index_id) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------  

-- Helps discover possible problems with out-of-date statistics
-- Also gives you an idea which indexes are the most active

-- sys.stats (Transact-SQL)
-- https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms177623.aspx



-- Look at most frequently modified indexes and statistics (Query 64) (Volatile Indexes)
SELECT o.[name] AS [Object Name], o.[object_id], o.[type_desc], s.[name] AS [Statistics Name], 
       s.stats_id, s.no_recompute, s.auto_created, s.is_temporary,
	   sp.modification_counter, sp.[rows], sp.rows_sampled, sp.last_updated
FROM sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.object_id = o.object_id
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_db_stats_properties(s.object_id, s.stats_id) AS sp
WHERE o.[type_desc] NOT IN (N'SYSTEM_TABLE', N'INTERNAL_TABLE')
AND sp.modification_counter > 0
ORDER BY sp.modification_counter DESC, o.name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you understand your workload and make better decisions about 
-- things like data compression and adding new indexes to a table



-- Get fragmentation info for all indexes above a certain size in the current database  (Query 65) (Index Fragmentation)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a very large database
SELECT DB_NAME(ps.database_id) AS [Database Name], SCHEMA_NAME(o.[schema_id]) AS [Schema Name],
OBJECT_NAME(ps.OBJECT_ID) AS [Object Name], i.[name] AS [Index Name], ps.index_id, 
ps.index_type_desc, ps.avg_fragmentation_in_percent, 
ps.fragment_count, ps.page_count, i.fill_factor, i.has_filter, 
i.filter_definition, i.[allow_page_locks]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats(DB_ID(),NULL, NULL, NULL , N'LIMITED') AS ps
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ps.[object_id] = i.[object_id] 
AND ps.index_id = i.index_id
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
WHERE ps.database_id = DB_ID()
AND ps.page_count > 2500
ORDER BY ps.avg_fragmentation_in_percent DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine whether you have framentation in your relational indexes
-- and how effective your index maintenance strategy is


--- Index Read/Write stats (all tables in current DB) ordered by Reads  (Query 66) (Overall Index Usage - Reads)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], i.[name] AS [IndexName], i.index_id, 
       s.user_seeks, s.user_scans, s.user_lookups,
	   s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads], 
	   s.user_updates AS [Writes],  
	   i.[type_desc] AS [Index Type], i.fill_factor AS [Fill Factor], i.has_filter, i.filter_definition, 
	   s.last_user_scan, s.last_user_lookup, s.last_user_seek
FROM sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(i.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
ORDER BY s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE); -- Order by reads
------

-- Show which indexes in the current database are most active for Reads


--- Index Read/Write stats (all tables in current DB) ordered by Writes  (Query 67) (Overall Index Usage - Writes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(i.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], i.[name] AS [IndexName], i.index_id,
	   s.user_updates AS [Writes], s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups AS [Total Reads], 
	   i.[type_desc] AS [Index Type], i.fill_factor AS [Fill Factor], i.has_filter, i.filter_definition,
	   s.last_system_update, s.last_user_update
FROM sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(i.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
ORDER BY s.user_updates DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);						 -- Order by writes
------

-- Show which indexes in the current database are most active for Writes


-- Get lock waits for current database (Query 68) (Lock Waits)
SELECT o.name AS [table_name], i.name AS [index_name], ios.index_id, ios.partition_number,
		SUM(ios.row_lock_wait_count) AS [total_row_lock_waits], 
		SUM(ios.row_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_row_lock_wait_in_ms],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_count) AS [total_page_lock_waits],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_page_lock_wait_in_ms],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms)+ SUM(row_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_lock_wait_in_ms]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_operational_stats(DB_ID(), NULL, NULL, NULL) AS ios
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ios.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ios.[object_id] = i.[object_id] 
AND ios.index_id = i.index_id
WHERE o.[object_id] > 100
GROUP BY o.name, i.name, ios.index_id, ios.partition_number
HAVING SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms)+ SUM(row_lock_wait_in_ms) > 0
ORDER BY total_lock_wait_in_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This query is helpful for troubleshooting blocking and deadlocking issues


-- Look at recent Full backups for the current database (Query 69) (Recent Full Backups)
SELECT TOP (30) bs.machine_name, bs.server_name, bs.database_name AS [Database Name], bs.recovery_model,
CONVERT (BIGINT, bs.backup_size / 1048576 ) AS [Uncompressed Backup Size (MB)],
CONVERT (BIGINT, bs.compressed_backup_size / 1048576 ) AS [Compressed Backup Size (MB)],
CONVERT (NUMERIC (20,2), (CONVERT (FLOAT, bs.backup_size) /
CONVERT (FLOAT, bs.compressed_backup_size))) AS [Compression Ratio], bs.has_backup_checksums, bs.is_copy_only,
DATEDIFF (SECOND, bs.backup_start_date, bs.backup_finish_date) AS [Backup Elapsed Time (sec)],
bs.backup_finish_date AS [Backup Finish Date], bmf.physical_device_name AS [Backup Location], bmf.physical_block_size
FROM msdb.dbo.backupset AS bs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.backupmediafamily AS bmf WITH (NOLOCK)
ON bs.media_set_id = bmf.media_set_id  
WHERE bs.database_name = DB_NAME(DB_ID())
AND bs.[type] = 'D' -- Change to L if you want Log backups
ORDER BY bs.backup_finish_date DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Are your backup sizes and times changing over time?
-- Are you using backup compression?
-- Are you using backup checksums?
-- Are you doing copy_only backups?
-- Have you done any backup tuning with striped backups, or changing the parameters of the backup command?


-- These three Pluralsight Courses go into more detail about how to run these queries and interpret the results

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 1 
-- https://bit.ly/2plxCer

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 2
-- https://bit.ly/2IuJpzI

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 3
-- https://bit.ly/2FIlCPb



-- Sign up for Microsoft Visual Studio Dev Essentials and get a free three month pass to Pluralsight

-- Microsoft Visual Studio Dev Essentials
-- https://bit.ly/1q6xbDL


-- Sign up for Microsoft Azure Essentials and get lots of free Azure usage credits, MCP exam voucher, three month Pluralsight subscription

-- Microsoft Azure Essentials
-- https://bit.ly/2JMWe8x


-- August 2017 blog series about upgrading and migrating SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2ftKVrX
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\dbaSystem\StartTimeResult.cs
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.dbaSystem
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The processed result how long a given step took
    /// </summary>
    public class StartTimeResult
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// What action was taken?
        /// </summary>
        public string Action { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// How long did things take?
        /// </summary>
        public TimeSpan Duration
        {
            get { return End - Start; }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// When did this action start?
        /// </summary>
        public DateTime Start { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// When did this action end?
        /// </summary>
        public DateTime End { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// Creates a new StartTimeResult with all values preconfigured
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Action">The action that was taken</param>
        /// <param name="Start">When did the action start?</param>
        /// <param name="End">When did the action end?</param>
        public StartTimeResult(string Action, DateTime Start, DateTime End)
        {
            this.Action = Action;
            this.Start = Start;
            this.End = End;
        }
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\diagnosticquery\SQLServerDiagnosticQueries_2008_201807.sql

-- SQL Server 2008 Diagnostic Information Queries
-- Glenn Berry 
-- Last Modified: July 5, 2018
-- https://sqlserverperformance.wordpress.com/
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/
-- Twitter: GlennAlanBerry

-- Please listen to my Pluralsight courses
-- https://www.pluralsight.com/author/glenn-berry

-- If you want to find all of our SQLskills SQL101 blog posts, check out https://www.sqlskills.com/help/sql101/

-- Many of these queries will not work if you have databases in 80 compatibility mode
-- Please make sure you are using the correct version of these diagnostic queries for your version of SQL Server

--******************************************************************************
--*   Copyright (C) 2018 Glenn Berry, SQLskills.com
--*   All rights reserved. 
--*
--*   For more scripts and sample code, check out 
--*      https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn
--*
--*   You may alter this code for your own *non-commercial* purposes. You may
--*   republish altered code as long as you include this copyright and give due credit. 
--*
--*
--*   THIS CODE AND INFORMATION ARE PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF 
--*   ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED 
--*   TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND/OR FITNESS FOR A
--*   PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
--*
--******************************************************************************

-- Check the major product version to see if it is SQL Server 2008
IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * WHERE CONVERT(varchar(128), SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion')) LIKE '10%')
	BEGIN
		DECLARE @ProductVersion varchar(128) = CONVERT(varchar(128), SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion'));
		RAISERROR ('Script does not match the ProductVersion [%s] of this instance. Many of these queries may not work on this version.' , 18 , 16 , @ProductVersion);
	END
	ELSE
		PRINT N'You have the correct major version of SQL Server for this diagnostic information script';


-- Instance level queries *******************************

-- SQL and OS Version information for current instance  (Query 1) (Version Info)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], @@VERSION AS [SQL Server and OS Version Info];
------


-- SQL Server 2008 RTM Builds       SQL Server 2008 SP1 Builds       SQL Server 2008 SP2 Builds		      SQL Server 2008 SP3 Builds						SQL Server 2008 SP4 Builds
-- Build           Description      Build          Description		 Build     Description			      Build		    Description							Build		Description
-- 10.0.1600        Gold RTM
-- 10.0.1763        RTM CU1
-- 10.0.1779        RTM CU2
-- 10.0.1787        RTM CU3    -->	10.0.2531		SP1 RTM
-- 10.0.1798        RTM CU4    -->	10.0.2710       SP1 CU1
-- 10.0.1806        RTM CU5    -->	10.0.2714       SP1 CU2 
-- 10.0.1812		RTM CU6    -->	10.0.2723       SP1 CU3
-- 10.0.1818        RTM CU7    -->	10.0.2734       SP1 CU4
-- 10.0.1823        RTM CU8    -->	10.0.2746		SP1 CU5
-- 10.0.1828		RTM CU9    -->	10.0.2757		SP1 CU6
-- 10.0.1835	    RTM CU10   -->	10.0.2766		SP1 CU7
-- RTM Branch Retired          -->	10.0.2775		SP1 CU8		-->  10.0.4000	   SP2 RTM
--								    10.0.2789		SP1 CU9
--								    10.0.2799		SP1 CU10	
--								    10.0.2804		SP1 CU11	-->  10.0.4266     SP2 CU1		
--								    10.0.2808		SP1 CU12	-->  10.0.4272	   SP2 CU2	
--								    10.0.2816	    SP1 CU13    -->  10.0.4279     SP2 CU3	
--								    10.0.2821		SP1 CU14	-->  10.0.4285	   SP2 CU4	-->				10.0.5500		SP3 RTM
--								    10.0.2847		SP1 CU15	-->  10.0.4316	   SP2 CU5  
--								    10.0.2850		SP1 CU16	-->  10.0.4321	   SP2 CU6	-->				10.0.5766		SP3 CU1	      10/17/2011
--                                  SP1 Branch Retired          -->  10.0.4323     SP2 CU7  -->             10.0.5768       SP3 CU2       11/21/2011
--                                                                   10.0.4326	   SP2 CU8  -->             10.0.5770		SP3 CU3       1/16/2012
--														             10.0.4330	   SP2 CU9  -->				10.0.5775		SP3 CU4       3/19/2012
--															         10.0.4332	   SP2 CU10 -->             10.0.5785       SP3 CU5		  5/21/2012
--															         10.0.4333     SP2 CU11 -->			    10.0.5788       SP3 CU6		  7/16/2012
--															         SP2 Branch Retired					    10.0.5794       SP3 CU7		  9/17/2012
--																								            10.0.5828       SP3 CU8		  11/19/2012
--																								            10.0.5829       SP3 CU9       1/21/2013
--																								            10.0.5835       SP3 CU10      3/19/2013
--                                                                                                          10.0.5841       SP3 CU11      5/20/2013
--                                                                                                          10.0.5844       SP3 CU12      7/15/2013
--                                                                                                          10.0.5846       SP3 CU13      9/16/2013
--                                                                                                          10.0.5848       SP3 CU14      11/18/2013
--                                                                                                          10.0.5850		SP3 CU15      1/20/2014
--                                                                                                          10.0.5852       SP3 CU16      3/17/2014
--                                                                                                          10.0.5861       SP3 CU17      5/19/2014			
--                                                                                                          10.0.5867       SP3 CU17+					  10.0.6000		SP4 RTM		9/30/2014
--                                                                                                                                                        10.0.6526     SP4 + HF    2/9/2015 
-- Security Update for SQL Server 2008 SP4 (KB4057114)  https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=56418                                    10.0.6556		SP4 + HF	1/5/2018
--
-- SQL Server 2008 RTM is considered an "unsupported service pack" as of April 13, 2010
-- SQL Server 2008 SP1 is considered an "unsupported service pack" as of September 19, 2011
-- SQL Server 2008 SP2 is considered an "unsupported service pack" as of September 17, 2012
-- Any build older than 10.0.5500 is on an "unsupported service pack"

-- SQL Server 2008 fell out of Mainstream Support on July 8, 2014

-- The SQL Server 2008 builds that were released after SQL Server 2008 was released
-- http://support.microsoft.com/kb/956909
--
-- The SQL Server 2008 builds that were released after SQL Server 2008 Service Pack 1 was released
-- http://support.microsoft.com/kb/970365
--
-- The SQL Server 2008 builds that were released after SQL Server 2008 Service Pack 2 was released 
-- http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2402659	
--
-- The SQL Server 2008 builds that were released after SQL Server 2008 Service Pack 3 was released
-- http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2629969					   

-- Download SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS)
-- https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt238290.aspx



-- When was SQL Server installed  (Query 2) (SQL Server Install Date)   
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], create_date AS [SQL Server Install Date] 
FROM sys.server_principals WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE name = N'NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM'
OR name = N'NT AUTHORITY\NETWORK SERVICE' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you the date and time that SQL Server was installed
-- It is a good idea to know how old your instance is


-- Get selected server properties (Query 3) (Server Properties)
SELECT SERVERPROPERTY('MachineName') AS [MachineName], SERVERPROPERTY('ServerName') AS [ServerName],  
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceName') AS [Instance], SERVERPROPERTY('IsClustered') AS [IsClustered], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS') AS [ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS], 
SERVERPROPERTY('Edition') AS [Edition], SERVERPROPERTY('ProductLevel') AS [ProductLevel], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion') AS [ProductVersion], SERVERPROPERTY('ProcessID') AS [ProcessID],
SERVERPROPERTY('Collation') AS [Collation], SERVERPROPERTY('IsFullTextInstalled') AS [IsFullTextInstalled], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsIntegratedSecurityOnly') AS [IsIntegratedSecurityOnly];
------

-- This gives you a lot of useful information about your instance of SQL Server,
-- such as the ProcessID for SQL Server and your collation


-- Get SQL Server Agent jobs and Category information (Query 4) (SQL Server Agent Jobs)
SELECT sj.name AS [Job Name], sj.[description] AS [Job Description], SUSER_SNAME(sj.owner_sid) AS [Job Owner],
sj.date_created AS [Date Created], sj.[enabled] AS [Job Enabled], 
sj.notify_email_operator_id, sj.notify_level_email, sc.name AS [CategoryName],
s.[enabled] AS [Sched Enabled], js.next_run_date, js.next_run_time
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobs AS sj WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.syscategories AS sc WITH (NOLOCK)
ON sj.category_id = sc.category_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobschedules AS js WITH (NOLOCK)
ON sj.job_id = js.job_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysschedules AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON js.schedule_id = s.schedule_id
ORDER BY sj.name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some basic information about your SQL Server Agent jobs, who owns them and how they are configured
-- Look for Agent jobs that are not owned by sa
-- Look for jobs that have a notify_email_operator_id set to 0 (meaning no operator)
-- Look for jobs that have a notify_level_email set to 0 (meaning no e-mail is ever sent)
--
-- MSDN sysjobs documentation
-- http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189817.aspx


-- Get SQL Server Agent Alert Information (Query 5) (SQL Server Agent Alerts)
SELECT name, event_source, message_id, severity, [enabled], has_notification, 
       delay_between_responses, occurrence_count, last_occurrence_date, last_occurrence_time
FROM msdb.dbo.sysalerts WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some basic information about your SQL Server Agent Alerts (which are different from SQL Server Agent jobs)
-- Read more about Agent Alerts here: https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/creating-sql-server-agent-alerts-for-critical-errors/


-- Returns a list of all global trace flags that are enabled (Query 6) (Global Trace Flags)
DBCC TRACESTATUS (-1);
------

-- If no global trace flags are enabled, no results will be returned.
-- It is very useful to know what global trace flags are currently enabled as part of the diagnostic process.

-- Common trace flags that should be enabled in most cases
-- TF 1117 - When growing a data file, grow all files at the same time so they remain the same size, reducing allocation contention points
--           http://support2.microsoft.com/kb/2154845
-- 
-- TF 1118 - Helps alleviate allocation contention in tempdb, SQL Server allocates full extents to each database object, 
--           thereby eliminating the contention on SGAM pages (more important with older versions of SQL Server)
--           Recommendations to reduce allocation contention in SQL Server tempdb database
--           http://support2.microsoft.com/kb/2154845

-- TF 2371 - Lowers auto update statistics threshold for large tables
--           http://blogs.msdn.com/b/saponsqlserver/archive/2011/09/07/changes-to-automatic-update-statistics-in-sql-server-traceflag-2371.aspx

-- TF 3226 - Supresses logging of successful database backup messages to the SQL Server Error Log
--           https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/paul/fed-up-with-backup-success-messages-bloating-your-error-logs/


-- SQL Server NUMA Node information  (Query 7) (SQL Server NUMA Info)
SELECT node_id, node_state_desc, memory_node_id, online_scheduler_count, 
       active_worker_count, avg_load_balance, resource_monitor_state
FROM sys.dm_os_nodes WITH (NOLOCK) 
WHERE node_state_desc <> N'ONLINE DAC' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some useful information about the composition 
-- and relative load on your NUMA nodes


-- Hardware information from SQL Server 2008  (Query 8) (Hardware Info)
-- (Cannot distinguish between HT and multi-core)
SELECT cpu_count AS [Logical CPU Count], hyperthread_ratio AS [Hyperthread Ratio],
cpu_count/hyperthread_ratio AS [Physical CPU Count], 
physical_memory_in_bytes/1048576 AS [Physical Memory (MB)], sqlserver_start_time 
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some good basic hardware information about your database server


-- Get System Manufacturer and model number from  (Query 9) (System Manufacturer)
-- SQL Server Error log. This query might take a few seconds 
-- if you have not recycled your error log recently
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'Manufacturer';
------ 

-- This can help you determine the capabilities
-- and capacities of your database server


-- Get processor description from Windows Registry  (Query 10) (Processor Description)
EXEC sys.xp_instance_regread N'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE', N'HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\CentralProcessor\0', N'ProcessorNameString';
------

-- Gives you the model number and rated clock speed of your processor(s)
-- Your processors may be running at less that the rated clock speed due
-- to the Windows Power Plan or hardware power management

-- You can use CPU-Z to get your actual CPU core speed and a lot of other useful information
-- http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html

-- You can learn more about processor selection for SQL Server by following this link
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/processor-selection-for-sql-server/



-- Get the current node name from your cluster nodes  (Query 11) (Cluster Node Properties)
-- (if your database server is in a failover cluster)
SELECT NodeName
FROM sys.dm_os_cluster_nodes WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Knowing which node owns the cluster resources is critical
-- Especially when you are installing Windows or SQL Server updates
-- You will see no results if your instance is not clustered


-- Get configuration values for instance  (Query 12) (Configuration Values)
SELECT name, value, value_in_use, minimum, maximum, [description], is_dynamic, is_advanced
FROM sys.configurations WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Focus on these settings:
-- backup compression default (should be 1 in most cases)
-- clr enabled (only enable if it is needed)
-- cost threshold for parallelism (depends on your workload)
-- lightweight pooling (should be zero)
-- max degree of parallelism (depends on your workload)
-- max server memory (MB) (set to an appropriate value, not the default)
-- optimize for ad hoc workloads (should be 1)
-- priority boost (should be zero)
-- remote admin connections (should be 1)





-- File names and paths for all user and system databases on instance   (Query 13) (Database Filenames and Paths)
SELECT DB_NAME([database_id]) AS [Database Name], 
       [file_id], [name], physical_name, [type_desc], state_desc,
	   is_percent_growth, growth,
	   CONVERT(bigint, growth/128.0) AS [Growth in MB], 
       CONVERT(bigint, size/128.0) AS [Total Size in MB]
FROM sys.master_files WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY DB_NAME([database_id]), [file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Things to look at:
-- Are data files and log files on different drives?
-- Is everything on the C: drive?
-- Is TempDB on dedicated drives?
-- Is there only one TempDB data file?
-- Are all of the TempDB data files the same size?
-- Are there multiple data files for user databases?
-- Is percent growth enabled for any files (which is bad)?


-- Look for I/O requests taking longer than 15 seconds in the five most recent SQL Server Error Logs (Query 14) (IO Warnings)
CREATE TABLE #IOWarningResults(LogDate datetime, ProcessInfo sysname, LogText nvarchar(1000));

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 1, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 2, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 3, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 4, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

SELECT LogDate, ProcessInfo, LogText
FROM #IOWarningResults
ORDER BY LogDate DESC;

DROP TABLE #IOWarningResults;
------  

-- Finding 15 second I/O warnings in the SQL Server Error Log is useful evidence of
-- poor I/O performance (which might have many different causes)
-- Look to see if you see any patterns in the results (same files, same drives, same time of day, etc.)

-- Diagnostics in SQL Server help detect stalled and stuck I/O operations
-- https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/897284


-- Drive level latency information (Query 15) (Drive Level Latency)
-- Based on code from Jimmy May
SELECT tab.[Drive], tab.volume_mount_point AS [Volume Mount Point], 
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_reads = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall_read_ms/num_of_reads) 
	END AS [Read Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_writes = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall_write_ms/num_of_writes) 
	END AS [Write Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN (num_of_reads = 0 AND num_of_writes = 0) THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall/(num_of_reads + num_of_writes)) 
	END AS [Overall Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_reads = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (num_of_bytes_read/num_of_reads) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Read],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_writes = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (num_of_bytes_written/num_of_writes) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Write],
	CASE 
		WHEN (num_of_reads = 0 AND num_of_writes = 0) THEN 0 
		ELSE ((num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/(num_of_reads + num_of_writes)) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Transfer]
FROM (SELECT LEFT(UPPER(mf.physical_name), 2) AS Drive, SUM(num_of_reads) AS num_of_reads,
	         SUM(io_stall_read_ms) AS io_stall_read_ms, SUM(num_of_writes) AS num_of_writes,
	         SUM(io_stall_write_ms) AS io_stall_write_ms, SUM(num_of_bytes_read) AS num_of_bytes_read,
	         SUM(num_of_bytes_written) AS num_of_bytes_written, SUM(io_stall) AS io_stall, vs.volume_mount_point 
      FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS vfs
      INNER JOIN sys.master_files AS mf WITH (NOLOCK)
      ON vfs.database_id = mf.database_id AND vfs.file_id = mf.file_id
	  CROSS APPLY sys.dm_os_volume_stats(mf.database_id, mf.[file_id]) AS vs 
      GROUP BY LEFT(UPPER(mf.physical_name), 2), vs.volume_mount_point) AS tab
ORDER BY [Overall Latency] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Shows you the drive-level latency for reads and writes, in milliseconds
-- Latency above 20-25ms is usually a problem


-- Calculates average stalls per read, per write, and per total input/output for each database file  (Query 16) (IO Stalls by File)
SELECT DB_NAME(fs.database_id) AS [Database Name], CAST(fs.io_stall_read_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_read_stall_ms],
CAST(fs.io_stall_write_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_write_stall_ms],
CAST((fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms)/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_io_stall_ms],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), mf.size/128.0) AS [File Size (MB)], mf.physical_name, mf.type_desc, fs.io_stall_read_ms, fs.num_of_reads, 
fs.io_stall_write_ms, fs.num_of_writes, fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms AS [io_stalls], fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes AS [total_io]
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(null,null) AS fs
INNER JOIN sys.master_files AS mf WITH (NOLOCK)
ON fs.database_id = mf.database_id
AND fs.[file_id] = mf.[file_id]
ORDER BY avg_io_stall_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database files on the entire instance have the most I/O bottlenecks
-- This can help you decide whether certain LUNs are overloaded and whether you might
-- want to move some files to a different location or perhaps improve your I/O performance


-- Recovery model, log reuse wait description, log file size, log usage size  (Query 17) (Database Properties)
-- and compatibility level for all databases on instance
SELECT db.[name] AS [Database Name], SUSER_SNAME(db.owner_sid) AS [Database Owner], db.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model], 
db.log_reuse_wait_desc AS [Log Reuse Wait Description], 
ls.cntr_value AS [Log Size (KB)], lu.cntr_value AS [Log Used (KB)],
CAST(CAST(lu.cntr_value AS FLOAT) / CAST(ls.cntr_value AS FLOAT)AS DECIMAL(18,2)) * 100 AS [Log Used %], 
db.[compatibility_level] AS [DB Compatibility Level], 
db.page_verify_option_desc AS [Page Verify Option], db.is_auto_create_stats_on, db.is_auto_update_stats_on,
db.is_auto_update_stats_async_on, db.is_parameterization_forced, 
db.snapshot_isolation_state_desc, db.is_read_committed_snapshot_on,
db.is_auto_close_on, db.is_auto_shrink_on, db.is_cdc_enabled, db.is_published
FROM sys.databases AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS lu WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.name = lu.instance_name
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS ls WITH (NOLOCK) 
ON db.name = ls.instance_name
WHERE lu.counter_name LIKE N'Log File(s) Used Size (KB)%' 
AND ls.counter_name LIKE N'Log File(s) Size (KB)%'
AND ls.cntr_value > 0 OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Things to look at:
-- How many databases are on the instance?
-- What recovery models are they using?
-- What is the log reuse wait description?
-- How full are the transaction logs ?
-- What compatibility level are the databases on? 
-- What is the Page Verify Option? (should be CHECKSUM)
-- Is Auto Update Statistics Asynchronously enabled?
-- Make sure auto_shrink and auto_close are not enabled!



-- Missing Indexes for all databases by Index Advantage  (Query 18) (Missing Indexes All Databases)
SELECT CONVERT(decimal(18,2), user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01)) AS [index_advantage], 
migs.last_user_seek, mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, migs.avg_total_user_cost, migs.avg_user_impact
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Getting missing index information for all of the databases on the instance is very useful
-- Look at last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
-- Also look at avg_user_impact and avg_total_user_cost to help determine importance
-- SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware
-- Do not just blindly add indexes that show up from this query!!!



-- Get VLF Counts for all databases on the instance (Query 19) (VLF Counts)
-- (adapted from Michelle Ufford) 
CREATE TABLE #VLFInfo (FileID  int,
					   FileSize bigint, StartOffset bigint,
					   FSeqNo      bigint, [Status]    bigint,
					   Parity      bigint, CreateLSN   numeric(38));
	 
CREATE TABLE #VLFCountResults(DatabaseName sysname, VLFCount int);
	 
EXEC sp_MSforeachdb N'Use [?]; 

				INSERT INTO #VLFInfo 
				EXEC sp_executesql N''DBCC LOGINFO([?])''; 
	 
				INSERT INTO #VLFCountResults 
				SELECT DB_NAME(), COUNT(*) 
				FROM #VLFInfo; 

				TRUNCATE TABLE #VLFInfo;'
	 
SELECT DatabaseName, VLFCount  
FROM #VLFCountResults
ORDER BY VLFCount DESC;
	 
DROP TABLE #VLFInfo;
DROP TABLE #VLFCountResults;
------

-- High VLF counts can affect write performance 
-- and they can make full database restores and crash recovery take much longer
-- Try to keep your VLF counts under 200 in most cases



-- Get CPU utilization by database (Query 20) (CPU Usage by Database)
WITH DB_CPU_Stats
AS
(SELECT pa.DatabaseID, DB_Name(pa.DatabaseID) AS [Database Name], SUM(qs.total_worker_time/1000) AS [CPU_Time_Ms]
 FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
 CROSS APPLY (SELECT CONVERT(int, value) AS [DatabaseID] 
              FROM sys.dm_exec_plan_attributes(qs.plan_handle)
              WHERE attribute = N'dbid') AS pa
 GROUP BY DatabaseID)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY [CPU_Time_Ms] DESC) AS [CPU Rank],
       [Database Name], [CPU_Time_Ms] AS [CPU Time (ms)], 
       CAST([CPU_Time_Ms] * 1.0 / SUM([CPU_Time_Ms]) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5, 2)) AS [CPU Percent]
FROM DB_CPU_Stats
WHERE DatabaseID <> 32767 -- ResourceDB
ORDER BY [CPU Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database is using the most CPU resources on the instance


-- Get I/O utilization by database (Query 21) (IO Usage By Database)
WITH Aggregate_IO_Statistics
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(SUM(num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/1048576 AS DECIMAL(12, 2)) AS io_in_mb
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS [DM_IO_STATS]
GROUP BY database_id)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY io_in_mb DESC) AS [I/O Rank], [Database Name], io_in_mb AS [Total I/O (MB)],
       CAST(io_in_mb/ SUM(io_in_mb) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [I/O Percent]
FROM Aggregate_IO_Statistics
ORDER BY [I/O Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database is using the most I/O resources on the instance


-- Get total buffer usage by database for current instance  (Query 22) (Total Buffer Usage by Database)
-- This make take some time to run on a busy instance
WITH AggregateBufferPoolUsage
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(COUNT(*) * 8/1024.0 AS DECIMAL (10,2))  AS [CachedSize]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE database_id <> 32767 -- ResourceDB
GROUP BY DB_NAME(database_id))
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY CachedSize DESC) AS [Buffer Pool Rank], [Database Name], CachedSize AS [Cached Size (MB)],
       CAST(CachedSize / SUM(CachedSize) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [Buffer Pool Percent]
FROM AggregateBufferPoolUsage
ORDER BY [Buffer Pool Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you how much memory (in the buffer pool) 
-- is being used by each database on the instance


-- Clear Wait Stats with this command
-- DBCC SQLPERF('sys.dm_os_wait_stats', CLEAR);

-- Isolate top waits for server instance since last restart or wait statistics clear (Query 23) (Top Waits)
WITH [Waits] 
AS (SELECT wait_type, wait_time_ms/ 1000.0 AS [WaitS],
          (wait_time_ms - signal_wait_time_ms) / 1000.0 AS [ResourceS],
           signal_wait_time_ms / 1000.0 AS [SignalS],
           waiting_tasks_count AS [WaitCount],
           100.0 *  wait_time_ms / SUM (wait_time_ms) OVER() AS [Percentage],
           ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY wait_time_ms DESC) AS [RowNum]
    FROM sys.dm_os_wait_stats WITH (NOLOCK)
    WHERE [wait_type] NOT IN (
        N'BROKER_EVENTHANDLER', N'BROKER_RECEIVE_WAITFOR', N'BROKER_TASK_STOP',
		N'BROKER_TO_FLUSH', N'BROKER_TRANSMITTER', N'CHECKPOINT_QUEUE',
        N'CHKPT', N'CLR_AUTO_EVENT', N'CLR_MANUAL_EVENT', N'CLR_SEMAPHORE',
        N'DBMIRROR_DBM_EVENT', N'DBMIRROR_EVENTS_QUEUE', N'DBMIRROR_WORKER_QUEUE',
		N'DBMIRRORING_CMD', N'DIRTY_PAGE_POLL', N'DISPATCHER_QUEUE_SEMAPHORE',
        N'EXECSYNC', N'FSAGENT', N'FT_IFTS_SCHEDULER_IDLE_WAIT', N'FT_IFTSHC_MUTEX',
        N'HADR_CLUSAPI_CALL', N'HADR_FILESTREAM_IOMGR_IOCOMPLETION', N'HADR_LOGCAPTURE_WAIT', 
		N'HADR_NOTIFICATION_DEQUEUE', N'HADR_TIMER_TASK', N'HADR_WORK_QUEUE',
        N'KSOURCE_WAKEUP', N'LAZYWRITER_SLEEP', N'LOGMGR_QUEUE', N'ONDEMAND_TASK_QUEUE',
        N'PWAIT_ALL_COMPONENTS_INITIALIZED', N'QDS_PERSIST_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP',
        N'QDS_CLEANUP_STALE_QUERIES_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP', N'REQUEST_FOR_DEADLOCK_SEARCH',
		N'RESOURCE_QUEUE', N'SERVER_IDLE_CHECK', N'SLEEP_BPOOL_FLUSH', N'SLEEP_DBSTARTUP',
		N'SLEEP_DCOMSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_MASTERDBREADY', N'SLEEP_MASTERMDREADY',
        N'SLEEP_MASTERUPGRADED', N'SLEEP_MSDBSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_SYSTEMTASK', N'SLEEP_TASK',
        N'SLEEP_TEMPDBSTARTUP', N'SNI_HTTP_ACCEPT', N'SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS_SLEEP',
		N'SQLTRACE_BUFFER_FLUSH', N'SQLTRACE_INCREMENTAL_FLUSH_SLEEP', N'SQLTRACE_WAIT_ENTRIES',
		N'WAIT_FOR_RESULTS', N'WAITFOR', N'WAITFOR_TASKSHUTDOWN', N'WAIT_XTP_HOST_WAIT',
		N'WAIT_XTP_OFFLINE_CKPT_NEW_LOG', N'WAIT_XTP_CKPT_CLOSE', N'XE_DISPATCHER_JOIN',
        N'XE_DISPATCHER_WAIT', N'XE_TIMER_EVENT')
    AND waiting_tasks_count > 0)
SELECT
    MAX (W1.wait_type) AS [WaitType],
	CAST (MAX (W1.Percentage) AS DECIMAL (5,2)) AS [Wait Percentage],
	CAST ((MAX (W1.WaitS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgWait_Sec],
    CAST ((MAX (W1.ResourceS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgRes_Sec],
    CAST ((MAX (W1.SignalS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgSig_Sec], 
    CAST (MAX (W1.WaitS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Wait_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.ResourceS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Resource_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.SignalS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Signal_Sec],
    MAX (W1.WaitCount) AS [Wait Count],
	CAST (N'https://www.sqlskills.com/help/waits/' + W1.wait_type AS XML) AS [Help/Info URL]
FROM Waits AS W1
INNER JOIN Waits AS W2
ON W2.RowNum <= W1.RowNum
GROUP BY W1.RowNum, W1.wait_type
HAVING SUM (W2.Percentage) - MAX (W1.Percentage) < 99 -- percentage threshold
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Cumulative wait stats are not as useful on an idle instance that is not under load or performance pressure

-- SQL Server Wait Types Library (Paul Randal)
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/help/waits/

-- The SQL Server Wait Type Repository
-- http://blogs.msdn.com/b/psssql/archive/2009/11/03/the-sql-server-wait-type-repository.aspx

-- Wait statistics, or please tell me where it hurts
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/paul/wait-statistics-or-please-tell-me-where-it-hurts/

-- SQL Server 2005 Performance Tuning using the Waits and Queues
-- http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc966413.aspx

-- sys.dm_os_wait_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms179984(v=sql.105).aspx




-- Signal Waits for instance  (Query 24) (Signal Waits)
SELECT CAST(100.0 * SUM(signal_wait_time_ms) / SUM (wait_time_ms) AS NUMERIC(20,2)) AS [% Signal (CPU) Waits],
CAST(100.0 * SUM(wait_time_ms - signal_wait_time_ms) / SUM (wait_time_ms) AS NUMERIC(20,2)) AS [% Resource Waits]
FROM sys.dm_os_wait_stats WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE wait_type NOT IN (
        N'BROKER_EVENTHANDLER', N'BROKER_RECEIVE_WAITFOR', N'BROKER_TASK_STOP',
		N'BROKER_TO_FLUSH', N'BROKER_TRANSMITTER', N'CHECKPOINT_QUEUE',
        N'CHKPT', N'CLR_AUTO_EVENT', N'CLR_MANUAL_EVENT', N'CLR_SEMAPHORE',
        N'DBMIRROR_DBM_EVENT', N'DBMIRROR_EVENTS_QUEUE', N'DBMIRROR_WORKER_QUEUE',
		N'DBMIRRORING_CMD', N'DIRTY_PAGE_POLL', N'DISPATCHER_QUEUE_SEMAPHORE',
        N'EXECSYNC', N'FSAGENT', N'FT_IFTS_SCHEDULER_IDLE_WAIT', N'FT_IFTSHC_MUTEX',
        N'HADR_CLUSAPI_CALL', N'HADR_FILESTREAM_IOMGR_IOCOMPLETION', N'HADR_LOGCAPTURE_WAIT', 
		N'HADR_NOTIFICATION_DEQUEUE', N'HADR_TIMER_TASK', N'HADR_WORK_QUEUE',
        N'KSOURCE_WAKEUP', N'LAZYWRITER_SLEEP', N'LOGMGR_QUEUE', N'ONDEMAND_TASK_QUEUE',
        N'PWAIT_ALL_COMPONENTS_INITIALIZED', N'QDS_PERSIST_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP',
        N'QDS_CLEANUP_STALE_QUERIES_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP', N'REQUEST_FOR_DEADLOCK_SEARCH',
		N'RESOURCE_QUEUE', N'SERVER_IDLE_CHECK', N'SLEEP_BPOOL_FLUSH', N'SLEEP_DBSTARTUP',
		N'SLEEP_DCOMSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_MASTERDBREADY', N'SLEEP_MASTERMDREADY',
        N'SLEEP_MASTERUPGRADED', N'SLEEP_MSDBSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_SYSTEMTASK', N'SLEEP_TASK',
        N'SLEEP_TEMPDBSTARTUP', N'SNI_HTTP_ACCEPT', N'SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS_SLEEP',
		N'SQLTRACE_BUFFER_FLUSH', N'SQLTRACE_INCREMENTAL_FLUSH_SLEEP', N'SQLTRACE_WAIT_ENTRIES',
		N'WAIT_FOR_RESULTS', N'WAITFOR', N'WAITFOR_TASKSHUTDOWN', N'WAIT_XTP_HOST_WAIT',
		N'WAIT_XTP_OFFLINE_CKPT_NEW_LOG', N'WAIT_XTP_CKPT_CLOSE', N'XE_DISPATCHER_JOIN',
        N'XE_DISPATCHER_WAIT', N'XE_TIMER_EVENT') OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Signal Waits above 10-15% is usually a confirming sign of CPU pressure
-- Cumulative wait stats are not as useful on an idle instance that is not under load or performance pressure
-- Resource waits are non-CPU related waits


--  Get logins that are connected and how many sessions they have (Query 25) (Connection Counts)
SELECT login_name, [program_name], COUNT(session_id) AS [session_count] 
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions WITH (NOLOCK)
GROUP BY login_name, [program_name]
ORDER BY COUNT(session_id) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This can help characterize your workload and
-- determine whether you are seeing a normal level of activity


-- Get a count of SQL connections by IP address (Query 26) (Connection Counts by IP Address)
SELECT ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name, 
COUNT(ec.session_id) AS [connection count] 
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions AS es WITH (NOLOCK) 
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_connections AS ec WITH (NOLOCK) 
ON es.session_id = ec.session_id 
GROUP BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name  
ORDER BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you figure where your database load is coming from
-- and verifies connectivity from other machines


-- Get Average Task Counts (run multiple times) (Query 27) (Avg Task Counts)
SELECT AVG(current_tasks_count) AS [Avg Task Count], 
AVG(runnable_tasks_count) AS [Avg Runnable Task Count],
AVG(pending_disk_io_count) AS [Avg Pending DiskIO Count]
FROM sys.dm_os_schedulers WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE scheduler_id < 255 OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Sustained values above 10 suggest further investigation in that area
-- High Avg Task Counts are often caused by blocking/deadlocking or other resource contention

-- Sustained values above 1 suggest further investigation in that area
-- High Avg Runnable Task Counts are a good sign of CPU pressure
-- High Avg Pending DiskIO Counts are a sign of disk pressure

-- How to Do Some Very Basic SQL Server Monitoring
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/how-to-do-some-very-basic-sql-server-monitoring/



-- Get CPU Utilization History for last 256 minutes (in one minute intervals)  (Query 28) (CPU Utilization History)
-- This version works with SQL Server 2008
DECLARE @ts_now bigint = (SELECT cpu_ticks/(cpu_ticks/ms_ticks) FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info WITH (NOLOCK)); 

SELECT TOP(256) SQLProcessUtilization AS [SQL Server Process CPU Utilization], 
               SystemIdle AS [System Idle Process], 
               100 - SystemIdle - SQLProcessUtilization AS [Other Process CPU Utilization], 
               DATEADD(ms, -1 * (@ts_now - [timestamp]), GETDATE()) AS [Event Time] 
FROM ( 
	  SELECT record.value('(./Record/@id)[1]', 'int') AS record_id, 
			record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/SystemIdle)[1]', 'int') 
			AS [SystemIdle], 
			record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/ProcessUtilization)[1]', 
			'int') 
			AS [SQLProcessUtilization], [timestamp] 
	  FROM ( 
			SELECT [timestamp], CONVERT(xml, record) AS [record] 
			FROM sys.dm_os_ring_buffers WITH (NOLOCK)
			WHERE ring_buffer_type = N'RING_BUFFER_SCHEDULER_MONITOR' 
			AND record LIKE N'%<SystemHealth>%') AS x 
	  ) AS y 
ORDER BY record_id DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at the trend over the entire period. 
-- Also look at high sustained Other Process CPU Utilization values


-- Get top total worker time queries for entire instance (Query 29) (Top Worker Time Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], t.[text] AS [Query Text],  
qs.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time], qs.min_worker_time AS [Min Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.max_worker_time AS [Max Worker Time], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count], 
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time], 
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads], 
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Physical Reads], qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
, qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- comment out this column if copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Helps you find the most expensive queries from a CPU perspective across the entire instance



-- Good basic information about OS memory amounts and state  (Query 30) (System Memory)
SELECT total_physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Physical Memory (MB)], 
       available_physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Available Memory (MB)], 
       total_page_file_kb/1024 AS [Total Page File (MB)], 
	   available_page_file_kb/1024 AS [Available Page File (MB)], 
	   system_cache_kb/1024 AS [System Cache (MB)],
       system_memory_state_desc AS [System Memory State]
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_memory WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You want to see "Available physical memory is high"
-- This indicates that you are not under external memory pressure


-- SQL Server Process Address space info  (Query 31) (Process Memory) 
-- (shows whether locked pages is enabled, among other things)
SELECT physical_memory_in_use_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Memory Usage (MB)],
       large_page_allocations_kb, locked_page_allocations_kb, page_fault_count, 
	   memory_utilization_percentage, available_commit_limit_kb, 
	   process_physical_memory_low, process_virtual_memory_low
FROM sys.dm_os_process_memory WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You want to see 0 for process_physical_memory_low
-- You want to see 0 for process_virtual_memory_low
-- This indicates that you are not under internal memory pressure


-- Page Life Expectancy (PLE) value for each NUMA node in current instance  (Query 32) (PLE by NUMA Node)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], RTRIM([object_name]) AS [Object Name], instance_name, cntr_value AS [Page Life Expectancy]
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N'%Buffer Node%' -- Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N'Page life expectancy' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- PLE is a good measurement of memory pressure.
-- Higher PLE is better. Watch the trend over time, not the absolute value.
-- This will only return one row for non-NUMA systems.

-- Page Life Expectancy isn�t what you think�
-- http://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/paul/page-life-expectancy-isnt-what-you-think/



-- Memory Grants Pending value for current instance  (Query 33) (Memory Grants Pending)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], RTRIM([object_name]) AS [Object Name], cntr_value AS [Memory Grants Pending]                                                                                                       
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N'%Memory Manager%' -- Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N'Memory Grants Pending' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Memory Grants Pending above zero for a sustained period is a very strong indicator of memory pressure


-- Memory Clerk Usage for instance  (Query 34) (Memory Clerk Usage)
-- Look for high value for CACHESTORE_SQLCP (Ad-hoc query plans)
SELECT TOP(10) [type] AS [Memory Clerk Type], SUM(single_pages_kb)/1024 AS [SPA Memory Usage (MB)] 
FROM sys.dm_os_memory_clerks WITH (NOLOCK)
GROUP BY [type]  
ORDER BY SUM(single_pages_kb) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- CACHESTORE_SQLCP  SQL Plans         
-- These are cached SQL statements or batches that aren't in stored procedures, functions and triggers
-- Watch out for high values for CACHESTORE_SQLCP

-- CACHESTORE_OBJCP  Object Plans      
-- These are compiled plans for stored procedures, functions and triggers



-- Find single-use, ad-hoc and prepared queries that are bloating the plan cache  (Query 35) (Ad hoc Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], t.[text] AS [Query Text], 
cp.objtype AS [Object Type], cp.cacheobjtype AS [Cache Object Type],  
cp.size_in_bytes/1024 AS [Plan Size in KB]
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t
WHERE cp.cacheobjtype = N'Compiled Plan' 
AND cp.objtype IN (N'Adhoc', N'Prepared') 
AND cp.usecounts = 1
ORDER BY cp.size_in_bytes DESC, DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you the text, type and size of single-use ad-hoc and prepared queries that waste space in the plan cache
-- Enabling 'optimize for ad hoc workloads' for the instance can help (SQL Server 2008 and above only)
-- Running DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE ('SQL Plans') periodically may be required to better control this.
-- Enabling forced parameterization for the database can help, but test first!

-- Plan cache, adhoc workloads and clearing the single-use plan cache bloat
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/kimberly/plan-cache-adhoc-workloads-and-clearing-the-single-use-plan-cache-bloat/



-- Database specific queries *****************************************************************

-- **** Please switch to a user database that you are interested in! *****
USE YourDatabaseName; -- make sure to change to an actual database on your instance, not the master system database
GO

-- Individual File Sizes and space available for current database  (Query 36) (File Sizes and Space)
SELECT f.name AS [File Name] , f.physical_name AS [Physical Name], 
CAST((f.size/128.0) AS DECIMAL(15,2)) AS [Total Size in MB],
CAST(f.size/128.0 - CAST(FILEPROPERTY(f.name, 'SpaceUsed') AS int)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(15,2)) 
AS [Available Space In MB], [file_id], fg.name AS [Filegroup Name]
FROM sys.database_files AS f WITH (NOLOCK) 
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.data_spaces AS fg WITH (NOLOCK) 
ON f.data_space_id = fg.data_space_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at how large and how full the files are and where they are located
-- Make sure the transaction log is not full!!



-- I/O Statistics by file for the current database  (Query 37) (IO Stats By File)
SELECT DB_NAME(DB_ID()) AS [Database Name], df.name AS [Logical Name], vfs.[file_id], 
df.physical_name AS [Physical Name], vfs.num_of_reads, vfs.num_of_writes, vfs.io_stall_read_ms, vfs.io_stall_write_ms,
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_read_ms/(vfs.io_stall_read_ms + vfs.io_stall_write_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_write_ms/(vfs.io_stall_write_ms + vfs.io_stall_read_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Writes Pct],
(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS [Writes + Reads], 
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_read/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Read], 
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_written/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Written],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_reads/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_writes/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Write Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_read/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Read Bytes Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_written/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Written Bytes Pct]
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(DB_ID(), NULL) AS vfs
INNER JOIN sys.database_files AS df WITH (NOLOCK)
ON vfs.[file_id]= df.[file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you characterize your workload better from an I/O perspective for this database
-- It helps you determine whether you has an OLTP or DW/DSS type of workload



-- Top cached queries by Execution Count (SQL Server 2008)  (Query 38) (Query Execution Counts)
SELECT TOP (100) qs.execution_count, qs.total_worker_time, qs.total_logical_reads, qs.total_elapsed_time,
SUBSTRING(qt.TEXT,qs.statement_start_offset/2 +1,
(CASE WHEN qs.statement_end_offset = -1
			THEN LEN(CONVERT(NVARCHAR(MAX), qt.TEXT)) * 2
	  ELSE qs.statement_end_offset END - qs.statement_start_offset)/2) AS query_text 
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) AS qt
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Look at non-stored procedure queries


-- Top Cached SPs By Execution Count (SQL 2008) (Query 39) (SP Execution Counts)
SELECT TOP(100) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.execution_count,
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime],  
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
qs.cached_time
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you which cached stored procedures are called the most often
-- This helps you characterize and baseline your workload


-- Top Cached SPs By Avg Elapsed Time (SQL 2008)  (Query 40) (SP Avg Elapsed Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time], 
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.execution_count, ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, 
GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute], qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], 
qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime], qs.cached_time
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY avg_elapsed_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find long-running cached stored procedures that
-- may be easy to optimize with standard query tuning techniques


-- Top Cached SPs By Avg Elapsed Time with execution time variability   (Query 41) (SP Avg Elapsed Variable Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.execution_count, qs.min_elapsed_time,
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
qs.max_elapsed_time, qs.last_elapsed_time,  qs.cached_time
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY avg_elapsed_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This gives you some interesting information about the variability in the
-- execution time of your cached stored procedures, which is useful for tuning


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Worker time (SQL 2008). Worker time relates to CPU cost  (Query 42) (SP Worker Time)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count 
AS [avg_elapsed_time], qs.cached_time
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a CPU perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of CPU pressure


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Reads (SQL 2008). Logical reads relate to memory pressure  (Query 43) (SP Logical Reads)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_reads AS [TotalLogicalReads], 
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalReads],qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute], 
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count 
AS [avg_elapsed_time], qs.cached_time
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a memory perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of memory pressure


-- Top Cached SPs By Total Physical Reads (SQL 2008). Physical reads relate to disk I/O pressure  (Query 44) (SP Physical Reads)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name],qs.total_physical_reads AS [TotalPhysicalReads], 
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgPhysicalReads], qs.execution_count, 
qs.total_logical_reads,qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count 
AS [avg_elapsed_time], qs.cached_time 
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND qs.total_physical_reads > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_physical_reads DESC, qs.total_logical_reads DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a read I/O perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of I/O pressure or of memory pressure
       
-- Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Writes (SQL 2008)  (Query 45) (SP Logical Writes) 
-- Logical writes relate to both memory and disk I/O pressure 
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_writes AS [TotalLogicalWrites], 
qs.total_logical_writes/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalWrites], qs.execution_count,
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Minute, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Minute],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time], 
qs.cached_time
FROM sys.procedures AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
AND qs.total_logical_writes > 0
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_writes DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you find the most expensive cached stored procedures from a write I/O perspective
-- You should look at this if you see signs of I/O pressure or of memory pressure


-- Lists the top statements by average input/output usage for the current database  (Query 46) (Top IO Statements)
SELECT TOP(50) OBJECT_NAME(qt.objectid, dbid) AS [SP Name],
(qs.total_logical_reads + qs.total_logical_writes) /qs.execution_count AS [Avg IO], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count],
SUBSTRING(qt.[text],qs.statement_start_offset/2, 
	(CASE 
		WHEN qs.statement_end_offset = -1 
	 THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 
		ELSE qs.statement_end_offset 
	 END - qs.statement_start_offset)/2) AS [Query Text]	
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) AS qt
WHERE qt.[dbid] = DB_ID()
ORDER BY [Avg IO] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you find the most expensive statements for I/O by SP



-- Possible Bad NC Indexes (writes > reads)  (Query 47) (Bad NC Indexes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(s.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], i.name AS [Index Name], i.index_id, 
i.is_disabled, i.is_hypothetical, i.has_filter, i.fill_factor,
user_updates AS [Total Writes], user_seeks + user_scans + user_lookups AS [Total Reads],
user_updates - (user_seeks + user_scans + user_lookups) AS [Difference]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(s.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
AND s.user_updates > (s.user_seeks + s.user_scans + s.user_lookups)
AND i.index_id > 1 AND i.[type_desc] = N'NONCLUSTERED'
AND i.is_primary_key = 0 AND i.is_unique_constraint = 0
ORDER BY [Difference] DESC, [Total Writes] DESC, [Total Reads] ASC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look for indexes with high numbers of writes and zero or very low numbers of reads
-- Consider your complete workload, and how long your instance has been running
-- Investigate further before dropping an index!


-- Missing Indexes for current database by Index Advantage  (Query 48) (Missing Indexes)
SELECT DISTINCT CONVERT(decimal(18,2), user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01)) AS [index_advantage], 
migs.last_user_seek, mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, migs.avg_total_user_cost, migs.avg_user_impact,
OBJECT_NAME(mid.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], p.rows AS [Table Rows]
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON p.[object_id] = mid.[object_id]
WHERE mid.database_id = DB_ID()
AND p.index_id < 2 
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at index advantage, last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
-- SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware
-- Do not just blindly add indexes that show up from this query!!!


-- Find missing index warnings for cached plans in the current database  (Query 49) (Missing Index Warnings)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a busy instance
SELECT TOP(25) OBJECT_NAME(objectid) AS [ObjectName], 
               query_plan, cp.objtype, cp.usecounts
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(cp.plan_handle) AS qp
WHERE CAST(query_plan AS NVARCHAR(MAX)) LIKE N'%MissingIndex%'
AND dbid = DB_ID()
ORDER BY cp.usecounts DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps you connect missing indexes to specific stored procedures
-- This can help you decide whether to add them or not


-- Breaks down buffers used by current database by object (table, index) in the buffer cache  (Query 50) (Buffer Usage)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a busy instance
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) AS [Object Name], p.index_id, 
CAST(COUNT(*)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [Buffer size(MB)],  
COUNT(*) AS [BufferCount], p.Rows AS [Row Count],
p.data_compression_desc AS [Compression Type]
FROM sys.allocation_units AS a WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors AS b WITH (NOLOCK)
ON a.allocation_unit_id = b.allocation_unit_id
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p WITH (NOLOCK)
ON a.container_id = p.hobt_id
WHERE b.database_id = CONVERT(int,DB_ID())
AND p.[object_id] > 100
GROUP BY p.[object_id], p.index_id, p.data_compression_desc, p.[Rows]
ORDER BY [BufferCount] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you what tables and indexes are using the most memory in the buffer cache
-- It can help identify possible candidates for data compression


-- Get Table names, row counts, and compression status for clustered index or heap  (Query 51) (Table Sizes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS [ObjectName], 
SUM(Rows) AS [RowCount], data_compression_desc AS [CompressionType]
FROM sys.partitions WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE index_id < 2 --ignore the partitions from the non-clustered index if any
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'sys%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'queue_%' 
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'filestream_tombstone%' 
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'fulltext%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'ifts_comp_fragment%'
AND OBJECT_NAME(object_id) NOT LIKE N'xml_index_nodes%'
GROUP BY object_id, data_compression_desc
ORDER BY SUM(Rows) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you an idea of table sizes, and possible data compression opportunities


-- Get some key table properties (Query 52) (Table Properties)
SELECT [name], create_date, lock_on_bulk_load, is_replicated, has_replication_filter, 
       is_tracked_by_cdc, lock_escalation_desc
FROM sys.tables WITH (NOLOCK) 
ORDER BY [name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some good information about your tables


-- Detect blocking (run multiple times)  (Query 53) (Detect Blocking)
SELECT t1.resource_type AS [lock type], DB_NAME(resource_database_id) AS [database],
t1.resource_associated_entity_id AS [blk object],t1.request_mode AS [lock req],  --- lock requested
t1.request_session_id AS [waiter sid], t2.wait_duration_ms AS [wait time],       -- spid of waiter  
(SELECT [text] FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r WITH (NOLOCK)                      -- get sql for waiter
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.[sql_handle]) 
WHERE r.session_id = t1.request_session_id) AS [waiter_batch],
(SELECT SUBSTRING(qt.[text],r.statement_start_offset/2, 
    (CASE WHEN r.statement_end_offset = -1 
    THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 
    ELSE r.statement_end_offset END - r.statement_start_offset)/2) 
FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(r.[sql_handle]) AS qt
WHERE r.session_id = t1.request_session_id) AS [waiter_stmt],					-- statement blocked
t2.blocking_session_id AS [blocker sid],										-- spid of blocker
(SELECT [text] FROM sys.sysprocesses AS p										-- get sql for blocker
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(p.[sql_handle]) 
WHERE p.spid = t2.blocking_session_id) AS [blocker_stmt]
FROM sys.dm_tran_locks AS t1 WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_waiting_tasks AS t2 WITH (NOLOCK)
ON t1.lock_owner_address = t2.resource_address OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps troubleshoot blocking and deadlocking issues
-- The results will change from second to second on a busy system
-- You should run this query multiple times when you see signs of blocking



-- When were Statistics last updated on all indexes?  (Query 54) (Statistics Update)
SELECT SCHEMA_NAME(o.Schema_ID) + N'.' + o.NAME AS [Object Name], o.type_desc AS [Object Type],
      i.name AS [Index Name], STATS_DATE(i.[object_id], i.index_id) AS [Statistics Date], 
      s.auto_created, s.no_recompute, s.user_created, st.row_count, st.used_page_count
FROM sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON o.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON i.[object_id] = s.[object_id] 
AND i.index_id = s.stats_id
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_partition_stats AS st WITH (NOLOCK)
ON o.[object_id] = st.[object_id]
AND i.[index_id] = st.[index_id]
WHERE o.[type] IN ('U', 'V')
AND st.row_count > 0
ORDER BY STATS_DATE(i.[object_id], i.index_id) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE); 
------ 

-- Helps discover possible problems with out-of-date statistics
-- Also gives you an idea which indexes are the most active


-- Get fragmentation info for all indexes above a certain size in the current database  (Query 55) (Index Fragmentation)
-- Note: This query could take some time on a very large database
SELECT DB_NAME(ps.database_id) AS [Database Name], OBJECT_NAME(ps.OBJECT_ID) AS [Object Name], 
i.name AS [Index Name], ps.index_id, ps.index_type_desc, ps.avg_fragmentation_in_percent, 
ps.fragment_count, ps.page_count, i.fill_factor, i.has_filter, i.filter_definition
FROM sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats(DB_ID(),NULL, NULL, NULL , N'LIMITED') AS ps
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ps.[object_id] = i.[object_id] 
AND ps.index_id = i.index_id
WHERE ps.database_id = DB_ID()
AND ps.page_count > 2500
ORDER BY ps.avg_fragmentation_in_percent DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine whether you have framentation in your relational indexes
-- and how effective your index maintenance strategy is


--- Index Read/Write stats (all tables in current DB) ordered by Reads  (Query 56) (Overall Index Usage - Reads)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(s.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], i.name AS [IndexName], i.index_id,
	   user_seeks + user_scans + user_lookups AS [Reads], s.user_updates AS [Writes],  
	   i.type_desc AS [IndexType], i.fill_factor AS [FillFactor], i.has_filter, i.filter_definition, 
	   s.last_user_scan, s.last_user_lookup, s.last_user_seek
FROM sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(s.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY user_seeks + user_scans + user_lookups DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE); -- Order by reads
------


-- Show which indexes in the current database are most active for Reads


--- Index Read/Write stats (all tables in current DB) ordered by Writes  (Query 57) (Overall Index Usage - Writes)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(s.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], i.name AS [IndexName], i.index_id,
	   s.user_updates AS [Writes], user_seeks + user_scans + user_lookups AS [Reads], 
	   i.type_desc AS [IndexType], i.fill_factor AS [FillFactor], i.has_filter, i.filter_definition,
	   s.last_system_update, s.last_user_update
FROM sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(s.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY s.user_updates DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);						 -- Order by writes
------

-- Show which indexes in the current database are most active for Writes


-- Get lock waits for current database (Query 58) (Lock Waits)
SELECT o.name AS [table_name], i.name AS [index_name], ios.index_id, ios.partition_number,
		SUM(ios.row_lock_wait_count) AS [total_row_lock_waits], 
		SUM(ios.row_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_row_lock_wait_in_ms],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_count) AS [total_page_lock_waits],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_page_lock_wait_in_ms],
		SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms)+ SUM(row_lock_wait_in_ms) AS [total_lock_wait_in_ms]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_operational_stats(DB_ID(), NULL, NULL, NULL) AS ios
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ios.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON ios.[object_id] = i.[object_id] 
AND ios.index_id = i.index_id
WHERE o.[object_id] > 100
GROUP BY o.name, i.name, ios.index_id, ios.partition_number
HAVING SUM(ios.page_lock_wait_in_ms)+ SUM(row_lock_wait_in_ms) > 0
ORDER BY total_lock_wait_in_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This query is helpful for troubleshooting blocking and deadlocking issues


-- Look at recent Full backups for the current database (Query 59) (Recent Full Backups)
SELECT TOP (30) bs.machine_name, bs.server_name, bs.database_name AS [Database Name], bs.recovery_model,
CONVERT (BIGINT, bs.backup_size / 1048576 ) AS [Uncompressed Backup Size (MB)],
CONVERT (BIGINT, bs.compressed_backup_size / 1048576 ) AS [Compressed Backup Size (MB)],
CONVERT (NUMERIC (20,2), (CONVERT (FLOAT, bs.backup_size) /
CONVERT (FLOAT, bs.compressed_backup_size))) AS [Compression Ratio], bs.has_backup_checksums, bs.is_copy_only,
DATEDIFF (SECOND, bs.backup_start_date, bs.backup_finish_date) AS [Backup Elapsed Time (sec)],
bs.backup_finish_date AS [Backup Finish Date], bmf.physical_device_name AS [Backup Location], bmf.physical_block_size
FROM msdb.dbo.backupset AS bs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.backupmediafamily AS bmf WITH (NOLOCK)
ON bs.media_set_id = bmf.media_set_id  
WHERE DATEDIFF (SECOND, bs.backup_start_date, bs.backup_finish_date) > 0 
AND bs.backup_size > 0
AND bs.type = 'D' -- Change to L if you want Log backups
AND database_name = DB_NAME(DB_ID())
ORDER BY bs.backup_finish_date DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Are your backup sizes and times changing over time?
-- Are you using backup compression?
-- Are you using backup checksums?
-- Are you doing copy_only backups?
-- Have you done any backup tuning with striped backups, or changing the parameters of the backup command?


-- These three Pluralsight Courses go into more detail about how to run these queries and interpret the results

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 1 
-- https://bit.ly/2plxCer

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 2
-- https://bit.ly/2IuJpzI

-- SQL Server 2014 DMV Diagnostic Queries � Part 3
-- https://bit.ly/2FIlCPb



-- Sign up for Microsoft Visual Studio Dev Essentials and get a free three month pass to Pluralsight

-- Microsoft Visual Studio Dev Essentials
-- http://bit.ly/1q6xbDL


-- Sign up for Microsoft Azure Essentials and get lots of free Azure usage credits, MCP exam voucher, three month Pluralsight subscription

-- Microsoft Azure Essentials
-- https://bit.ly/2JMWe8x


-- August 2017 blog series about upgrading and migrating SQL Server
-- https://bit.ly/2ftKVrX
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\dbatools.csproj
 
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\Discovery\DbaBrowserReply.cs
using System;

namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Discovery
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The reply the browser service gave
    /// </summary>
    [Serializable]
    public class DbaBrowserReply
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The machine name of the computer
        /// </summary>
        public string MachineName { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// the computername of the computer
        /// </summary>
        public string ComputerName { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// The instance running on the computer
        /// </summary>
        public string SqlInstance { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// The name of the instance, running on the computer
        /// </summary>
        public string InstanceName { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// The port number the instance is running under
        /// </summary>
        public int TCPPort { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// The version of the SQL Server
        /// </summary>
        public string Version { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// Whether the instance is part of a cluster or no.
        /// </summary>
        public bool IsClustered { get; set; }

        /// <summary>
        /// Override in order to make it look neater in PowerShell
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public override string ToString()
        {
            return SqlInstance;
        }
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\projects\dbatools\dbatools\Discovery\DbaInstanceAvailability.cs
namespace Sqlcollaborative.Dbatools.Discovery
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Indiciator for whether an instance is known to be available or not
    /// </summary>
    public enum DbaInstanceAvailability
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// It is not known, whether the instance is available or not
        /// </summary>
        Unknown = 0,

        /// <summary>
        /// The instance is known to be available
        /// </summary>
        Available = 1,

        /// <summary>
        /// The instance is known to be not available
        /// </summary>
        Unavailable = 2
    }
}
tools\dbatools\bin\diagnosticquery\SQLServerDiagnosticQueries_2008R2_201807.sql

-- SQL Server 2008 R2 Diagnostic Information Queries
-- Glenn Berry 
-- Last Modified: July 10, 2018
-- https://www.sqlserverperformance.wordpress.com/
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/
-- Twitter: GlennAlanBerry

-- Please listen to my Pluralsight courses
-- https://www.pluralsight.com/author/glenn-berry

-- If you want to find all of our SQLskills SQL101 blog posts, check out https://www.sqlskills.com/help/sql101/

-- Many of these queries will not work if you have databases in 80 compatibility mode
-- Please make sure you are using the correct version of these diagnostic queries for your version of SQL Server

--******************************************************************************
--*   Copyright (C) 2018 Glenn Berry, SQLskills.com
--*   All rights reserved. 
--*
--*   For more scripts and sample code, check out 
--*      https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn
--*
--*   You may alter this code for your own *non-commercial* purposes. You may
--*   republish altered code as long as you include this copyright and give due credit. 
--*
--*
--*   THIS CODE AND INFORMATION ARE PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF 
--*   ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED 
--*   TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND/OR FITNESS FOR A
--*   PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
--*
--******************************************************************************

-- Note: A number of these queries will only work on SQL Server 2008 R2 SP1 or later
-- They are all noted in the instructions

-- Check the major product version to see if it is SQL Server 2008 R2
IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * WHERE CONVERT(varchar(128), SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion')) LIKE '10.5%')
	BEGIN
		DECLARE @ProductVersion varchar(128) = CONVERT(varchar(128), SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion'));
		RAISERROR ('Script does not match the ProductVersion [%s] of this instance. Many of these queries may not work on this version.' , 18 , 16 , @ProductVersion);
	END
	ELSE
		PRINT N'You have the correct major version of SQL Server for this diagnostic information script';


-- Instance level queries *******************************

-- SQL and OS Version information for current instance  (Query 1) (Version Info)
SELECT SERVERPROPERTY ('MachineName') AS [Server Name], @@VERSION AS [SQL Server and OS Version Info];
------


-- SQL Server 2008 R2 Builds				SQL Server 2008 R2 SP1 Builds			SQL Server 2008 R2 SP2 Builds							SQL Server 2008 R2 SP3 Builds
-- Build			Description				Build		Description					Build		Description									Build		Description
-- 10.50.1092		August 2009 CTP2		
-- 10.50.1352		November 2009 CTP3
-- 10.50.1450		Release Candidate
-- 10.50.1600		RTM
-- 10.50.1702		RTM CU1
-- 10.50.1720		RTM CU2
-- 10.50.1734		RTM CU3
-- 10.50.1746		RTM CU4
-- 10.50.1753		RTM CU5
-- 10.50.1765		RTM CU6	 --->			10.50.2500	SP1 RTM
-- 10.50.1777		RTM CU7
-- 10.50.1797		RTM CU8	 --->			10.50.2769  SP1 CU1
-- 10.50.1804       RTM CU9  --->			10.50.2772  SP1 CU2
-- 10.50.1807		RTM CU10 --->           10.50.2789  SP1 CU3
-- 10.50.1809       RTM CU11 --->			10.50.2796  SP1 CU4 
-- 10.50.1810		RTM CU12 --->			10.50.2806	SP1 CU5		--->			10.50.4000	SP2 RTM
-- 10.50.1815		RTM CU13 --->           10.50.2811  SP1 CU6
-- 10.50.1817		RTM CU14 --->			10.50.2817  SP1 CU7		--->			10.50.4260	SP2 CU1			         7/24/2012
-- RTM Branch Retired        --->			10.50.2822  SP1 CU8     --->			10.50.4263  SP2 CU2                  8/31/2012   
--											10.50.2866  SP1 CU9     --->			10.50.4266  SP2 CU3					10/15/2012
--                                          10.50.2868  SP1 CU10    --->			10.50.4270  SP2 CU4					12/17/2012
--                                          10.50.2869  SP1 CU11    --->            10.50.4276  SP2 CU5				     2/18/2013
--                                          10.50.2874  SP1 CU12    --->            10.50.4279  SP2 CU6                  4/15/2013
--                                          10.50.2876  SP1 CU13    --->            10.50.4286  SP2 CU7					 6/17/2013
--                                          10.50.2881  SP1 CU14    --->            10.50.4290  SP2 CU8                  8/22/2013
--                                                                                  10.50.4295  SP2 CU9                 10/28/2013  
--                                                                                  10.50.4297  SP2 CU10                12/16/2013 
--                                                                                  10.50.4302  SP2 CU11                 2/17/2014
--                                                                                  10.50.4305	SP2 CU12                 4/21/2014
--                                                                                  10.50.4319  SP2 CU13                 6/30/2014   
--																																			10.50.6000	SP3 RTM		9/26/2014
--                                                                                                                                          10.50.6525  SP3 + HF     2/9/2015      http://support.microsoft.com/kb/3033860
-- Security Update for SQL Server 2008 R2 SP3 (KB4057113) https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=56415					10.50.6560	SP3 + HF	 1/5/2018	   Hot fix for Spectre/Meltdown


-- SQL Server 2008 R2 SP3 RTM plus an on-demand hotfix (Build 10.50.6525) is the final public build of SQL Server 2008 R2, barring any later security fixes.          

-- SQL Server 2008 R2 RTM was considered an "unsupported service pack" as of July 12, 2012
-- SQL Server 2008 R2 SP1 was considered an "unsupported service pack" as of August 8, 2013										

-- The SQL Server 2008 R2 builds that were released after SQL Server 2008 R2 was released
-- http://support.microsoft.com/kb/981356

-- The SQL Server 2008 R2 builds that were released after SQL Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1 was released 
-- http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2567616

-- The SQL Server 2008 R2 builds that were released after SQL Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 2 was released
-- http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2730301 

-- SQL Server 2008 R2 SP2 CU13 is the final cumulative update for SQL Server 2008 R2 SP2

-- SQL Server 2008 R2 SP3 Release information
-- http://support2.microsoft.com/kb/2979597

-- Download SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS)
-- https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt238290.aspx



-- When was SQL Server installed  (Query 2) (SQL Server Install Date) 
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], create_date AS [SQL Server Install Date] 
FROM sys.server_principals WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE name = N'NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM'
OR name = N'NT AUTHORITY\NETWORK SERVICE' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you the date and time that SQL Server was installed
-- It is a good idea to know how old your instance is


-- Get selected server properties (Query 3) (Server Properties)
SELECT SERVERPROPERTY('MachineName') AS [MachineName], SERVERPROPERTY('ServerName') AS [ServerName],  
SERVERPROPERTY('InstanceName') AS [Instance], SERVERPROPERTY('IsClustered') AS [IsClustered], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS') AS [ComputerNamePhysicalNetBIOS], 
SERVERPROPERTY('Edition') AS [Edition], SERVERPROPERTY('ProductLevel') AS [ProductLevel], 
SERVERPROPERTY('ProductVersion') AS [ProductVersion], SERVERPROPERTY('ProcessID') AS [ProcessID],
SERVERPROPERTY('Collation') AS [Collation], SERVERPROPERTY('IsFullTextInstalled') AS [IsFullTextInstalled], 
SERVERPROPERTY('IsIntegratedSecurityOnly') AS [IsIntegratedSecurityOnly];
------

-- This gives you a lot of useful information about your instance of SQL Server,
-- such as the ProcessID for SQL Server and your collation


-- Get SQL Server Agent jobs and Category information (Query 4) (SQL Server Agent Jobs)
SELECT sj.name AS [Job Name], sj.[description] AS [Job Description], SUSER_SNAME(sj.owner_sid) AS [Job Owner],
sj.date_created AS [Date Created], sj.[enabled] AS [Job Enabled], 
sj.notify_email_operator_id, sj.notify_level_email, sc.name AS [CategoryName],
s.[enabled] AS [Sched Enabled], js.next_run_date, js.next_run_time
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobs AS sj WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.syscategories AS sc WITH (NOLOCK)
ON sj.category_id = sc.category_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobschedules AS js WITH (NOLOCK)
ON sj.job_id = js.job_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysschedules AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
ON js.schedule_id = s.schedule_id
ORDER BY sj.name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some basic information about your SQL Server Agent jobs, who owns them and how they are configured
-- Look for Agent jobs that are not owned by sa
-- Look for jobs that have a notify_email_operator_id set to 0 (meaning no operator)
-- Look for jobs that have a notify_level_email set to 0 (meaning no e-mail is ever sent)
--
-- MSDN sysjobs documentation
-- http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189817.aspx


-- Get SQL Server Agent Alert Information (Query 5) (SQL Server Agent Alerts)
SELECT name, event_source, message_id, severity, [enabled], has_notification, 
       delay_between_responses, occurrence_count, last_occurrence_date, last_occurrence_time
FROM msdb.dbo.sysalerts WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some basic information about your SQL Server Agent Alerts (which are different from SQL Server Agent jobs)
-- Read more about Agent Alerts here: https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/creating-sql-server-agent-alerts-for-critical-errors/


-- Returns a list of all global trace flags that are enabled (Query 6) (Global Trace Flags)
DBCC TRACESTATUS (-1);
------

-- If no global trace flags are enabled, no results will be returned.
-- It is very useful to know what global trace flags are currently enabled as part of the diagnostic process.

-- Common trace flags that should be enabled in most cases
-- TF 1117 - When growing a data file, grow all files at the same time so they remain the same size, reducing allocation contention points
--           http://support2.microsoft.com/kb/2154845
-- 
-- TF 1118 - Helps alleviate allocation contention in tempdb, SQL Server allocates full extents to each database object, 
--           thereby eliminating the contention on SGAM pages (more important with older versions of SQL Server)
--           Recommendations to reduce allocation contention in SQL Server tempdb database
--           http://support2.microsoft.com/kb/2154845

-- TF 2371 - Lowers auto update statistics threshold for large tables
--           http://blogs.msdn.com/b/saponsqlserver/archive/2011/09/07/changes-to-automatic-update-statistics-in-sql-server-traceflag-2371.aspx

-- TF 3226 - Supresses logging of successful database backup messages to the SQL Server Error Log
--           https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/paul/fed-up-with-backup-success-messages-bloating-your-error-logs/


-- Windows information (SQL Server 2008 R2 SP1 or greater)  (Query 7) (Windows Info)
SELECT windows_release, windows_service_pack_level, 
       windows_sku, os_language_version
FROM sys.dm_os_windows_info WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you major OS version, Service Pack, Edition, and language info for the operating system 
-- 6.3 is either Windows 8.1 or Windows Server 2012 R2
-- 6.2 is either Windows 8 or Windows Server 2012
-- 6.1 is either Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2
-- 6.0 is either Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008
-- 5.2 is either Windows XP or Windows Server 2003

-- Windows SKU codes
-- 4 is Enterprise Edition
-- 7 is Standard Server Edition
-- 8 is Datacenter Server Edition
-- 10 is Enterprise Server Edition
-- 48 is Professional Edition

-- 1033 for os_language_version is US-English

-- Hardware and Software Requirements for Installing SQL Server 2008 R2
-- http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms143506(v=sql.105).aspx

-- Using SQL Server in Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 environments
-- http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2681562


-- SQL Server Services information (SQL Server 2008 R2 SP1 or greater)  (Query 8) (SQL Server Services Info)
SELECT servicename, process_id, startup_type_desc, status_desc, 
last_startup_time, service_account, is_clustered, cluster_nodename, [filename]
FROM sys.dm_server_services WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you the account being used for the SQL Server Service and the SQL Agent Service
-- Shows the processid, when they were last started, and their current status
-- Shows whether you are running on a failover cluster instance


-- SQL Server NUMA Node information  (Query 9) (SQL Server NUMA Info)
SELECT node_id, node_state_desc, memory_node_id, processor_group, online_scheduler_count, 
       active_worker_count, avg_load_balance, resource_monitor_state
FROM sys.dm_os_nodes WITH (NOLOCK) 
WHERE node_state_desc <> N'ONLINE DAC' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some useful information about the composition 
-- and relative load on your NUMA nodes


-- Hardware information from SQL Server 2008 R2  (Query 10) (Hardware Info)
-- (Cannot distinguish between HT and multi-core)
SELECT cpu_count AS [Logical CPU Count], hyperthread_ratio AS [Hyperthread Ratio],
cpu_count/hyperthread_ratio AS [Physical CPU Count], 
physical_memory_in_bytes/1048576 AS [Physical Memory (MB)], 
sqlserver_start_time, affinity_type_desc 
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you some good basic hardware information about your database server


-- Get System Manufacturer and model number from  (Query 11) (System Manufacturer)
-- SQL Server Error log. This query might take a few seconds 
-- if you have not recycled your error log recently
EXEC sys.xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'Manufacturer';
------ 

-- This can help you determine the capabilities
-- and capacities of your database server


-- Get processor description from Windows Registry  (Query 12) (Processor Description)
EXEC sys.xp_instance_regread N'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE', N'HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\CentralProcessor\0', N'ProcessorNameString';
------

-- Gives you the model number and rated clock speed of your processor(s)
-- Your processors may be running at less than the rated clock speed due
-- to the Windows Power Plan or hardware power management

-- You can use CPU-Z to get your actual CPU core speed and a lot of other useful information
-- http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html

-- You can learn more about processor selection for SQL Server by following this link
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/processor-selection-for-sql-server/



-- Get the current node name from your cluster nodes  (Query 13) (Cluster Node Properties)
-- (if your database server is in a failover cluster)
SELECT NodeName
FROM sys.dm_os_cluster_nodes WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Knowing which node owns the cluster resources is critical
-- Especially when you are installing Windows or SQL Server updates
-- You will see no results if your instance is not clustered


-- Get configuration values for instance  (Query 14) (Configuration Values)
SELECT name, value, value_in_use, minimum, maximum, [description], is_dynamic, is_advanced
FROM sys.configurations WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY name OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Focus on these settings:
-- backup compression default (should be 1 in most cases)
-- clr enabled (only enable if it is needed)
-- cost threshold for parallelism (depends on your workload)
-- lightweight pooling (should be zero)
-- max degree of parallelism (depends on your workload)
-- max server memory (MB) (set to an appropriate value, not the default)
-- optimize for ad hoc workloads (should be 1)
-- priority boost (should be zero)
-- remote admin connections (should be 1)




-- Get information on location, time and size of any memory dumps from SQL Server (SQL Server 2008 R2 SP1 or greater)  (Query 15) (Memory Dump Info)
SELECT [filename], creation_time, size_in_bytes/1048576.0 AS [Size (MB)]
FROM sys.dm_server_memory_dumps WITH (NOLOCK) 
ORDER BY creation_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This will not return any rows if you have 
-- not had any memory dumps (which is a good thing)


-- File names and paths for all user and system databases on instance   (Query 16) (Database Filenames and Paths)
SELECT DB_NAME([database_id]) AS [Database Name], 
       [file_id], [name], physical_name, [type_desc], state_desc,
	   is_percent_growth, growth,
	   CONVERT(bigint, growth/128.0) AS [Growth in MB], 
       CONVERT(bigint, size/128.0) AS [Total Size in MB]
FROM sys.master_files WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY DB_NAME([database_id]), [file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Things to look at:
-- Are data files and log files on different drives?
-- Is everything on the C: drive?
-- Is TempDB on dedicated drives?
-- Is there only one TempDB data file?
-- Are all of the TempDB data files the same size?
-- Are there multiple data files for user databases?
-- Is percent growth enabled for any files (which is bad)?


-- Volume info for all LUNS that have database files on the current instance (SQL Server 2008 R2 SP1 or greater)  (Query 17) (Volume Info)
SELECT DISTINCT vs.volume_mount_point, vs.file_system_type, 
vs.logical_volume_name, CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2),vs.total_bytes/1073741824.0) AS [Total Size (GB)],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2),vs.available_bytes/1073741824.0) AS [Available Size (GB)],  
CAST(CAST(vs.available_bytes AS FLOAT)/ CAST(vs.total_bytes AS FLOAT) AS DECIMAL(18,2)) * 100 AS [Space Free %] 
FROM sys.master_files AS f WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_os_volume_stats(f.database_id, f.[file_id]) AS vs OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

--Shows you the total and free space on the LUNs where you have database files


-- Look for I/O requests taking longer than 15 seconds in the five most recent SQL Server Error Logs (Query 18) (IO Warnings)
CREATE TABLE #IOWarningResults(LogDate datetime, ProcessInfo sysname, LogText nvarchar(1000));

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 0, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 1, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 2, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 3, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

	INSERT INTO #IOWarningResults 
	EXEC xp_readerrorlog 4, 1, N'taking longer than 15 seconds';

SELECT LogDate, ProcessInfo, LogText
FROM #IOWarningResults
ORDER BY LogDate DESC;

DROP TABLE #IOWarningResults;
------  

-- Finding 15 second I/O warnings in the SQL Server Error Log is useful evidence of
-- poor I/O performance (which might have many different causes)
-- Look to see if you see any patterns in the results (same files, same drives, same time of day, etc.)

-- Diagnostics in SQL Server help detect stalled and stuck I/O operations
-- https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/897284



-- Drive level latency information (Query 19) (Drive Level Latency)
-- Based on code from Jimmy May
SELECT tab.[Drive], tab.volume_mount_point AS [Volume Mount Point], 
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_reads = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall_read_ms/num_of_reads) 
	END AS [Read Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_writes = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall_write_ms/num_of_writes) 
	END AS [Write Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN (num_of_reads = 0 AND num_of_writes = 0) THEN 0 
		ELSE (io_stall/(num_of_reads + num_of_writes)) 
	END AS [Overall Latency],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_reads = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (num_of_bytes_read/num_of_reads) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Read],
	CASE 
		WHEN num_of_writes = 0 THEN 0 
		ELSE (num_of_bytes_written/num_of_writes) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Write],
	CASE 
		WHEN (num_of_reads = 0 AND num_of_writes = 0) THEN 0 
		ELSE ((num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/(num_of_reads + num_of_writes)) 
	END AS [Avg Bytes/Transfer]
FROM (SELECT LEFT(UPPER(mf.physical_name), 2) AS Drive, SUM(num_of_reads) AS num_of_reads,
	         SUM(io_stall_read_ms) AS io_stall_read_ms, SUM(num_of_writes) AS num_of_writes,
	         SUM(io_stall_write_ms) AS io_stall_write_ms, SUM(num_of_bytes_read) AS num_of_bytes_read,
	         SUM(num_of_bytes_written) AS num_of_bytes_written, SUM(io_stall) AS io_stall, vs.volume_mount_point 
      FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS vfs
      INNER JOIN sys.master_files AS mf WITH (NOLOCK)
      ON vfs.database_id = mf.database_id AND vfs.file_id = mf.file_id
	  CROSS APPLY sys.dm_os_volume_stats(mf.database_id, mf.[file_id]) AS vs 
      GROUP BY LEFT(UPPER(mf.physical_name), 2), vs.volume_mount_point) AS tab
ORDER BY [Overall Latency] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Shows you the drive-level latency for reads and writes, in milliseconds
-- Latency above 20-25ms is usually a problem


-- Calculates average stalls per read, per write, and per total input/output for each database file  (Query 20) (IO Stalls by File)
SELECT DB_NAME(fs.database_id) AS [Database Name], CAST(fs.io_stall_read_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_read_stall_ms],
CAST(fs.io_stall_write_ms/(1.0 + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_write_stall_ms],
CAST((fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms)/(1.0 + fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_io_stall_ms],
CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,2), mf.size/128.0) AS [File Size (MB)], mf.physical_name, mf.type_desc, fs.io_stall_read_ms, fs.num_of_reads, 
fs.io_stall_write_ms, fs.num_of_writes, fs.io_stall_read_ms + fs.io_stall_write_ms AS [io_stalls], fs.num_of_reads + fs.num_of_writes AS [total_io]
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(null,null) AS fs
INNER JOIN sys.master_files AS mf WITH (NOLOCK)
ON fs.database_id = mf.database_id
AND fs.[file_id] = mf.[file_id]
ORDER BY avg_io_stall_ms DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database files on the entire instance have the most I/O bottlenecks
-- This can help you decide whether certain LUNs are overloaded and whether you might
-- want to move some files to a different location or perhaps improve your I/O performance


-- Recovery model, log reuse wait description, log file size, log usage size  (Query 21) (Database Properties)
-- and compatibility level for all databases on instance
SELECT db.[name] AS [Database Name], db.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model], 
db.log_reuse_wait_desc AS [Log Reuse Wait Description], 
ls.cntr_value AS [Log Size (KB)], lu.cntr_value AS [Log Used (KB)],
CAST(CAST(lu.cntr_value AS FLOAT) / CAST(ls.cntr_value AS FLOAT)AS DECIMAL(18,2)) * 100 AS [Log Used %], 
db.[compatibility_level] AS [DB Compatibility Level], 
db.page_verify_option_desc AS [Page Verify Option], db.is_auto_create_stats_on, db.is_auto_update_stats_on,
db.is_auto_update_stats_async_on, db.is_parameterization_forced, 
db.snapshot_isolation_state_desc, db.is_read_committed_snapshot_on,
db.is_auto_close_on, db.is_auto_shrink_on, db.is_cdc_enabled, db.is_published
FROM sys.databases AS db WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS lu WITH (NOLOCK)
ON db.name = lu.instance_name
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS ls WITH (NOLOCK) 
ON db.name = ls.instance_name
WHERE lu.counter_name LIKE N'Log File(s) Used Size (KB)%' 
AND ls.counter_name LIKE N'Log File(s) Size (KB)%'
AND ls.cntr_value > 0
ORDER BY db.[name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Things to look at:
-- How many databases are on the instance?
-- What recovery models are they using?
-- What is the log reuse wait description?
-- How full are the transaction logs ?
-- What compatibility level are the databases on? 
-- What is the Page Verify Option? (should be CHECKSUM)
-- Is Auto Update Statistics Asynchronously enabled?
-- Make sure auto_shrink and auto_close are not enabled!



-- Missing Indexes for all databases by Index Advantage  (Query 22) (Missing Indexes All Databases)
SELECT CONVERT(decimal(18,2), user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01)) AS [index_advantage],  
migs.last_user_seek, mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, migs.avg_total_user_cost, migs.avg_user_impact
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Getting missing index information for all of the databases on the instance is very useful
-- Look at last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
-- Also look at avg_user_impact and avg_total_user_cost to help determine importance
-- SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware
-- Do not just blindly add indexes that show up from this query!!!



-- Get VLF Counts for all databases on the instance (Query 23) (VLF Counts)
-- (adapted from Michelle Ufford) 
CREATE TABLE #VLFInfo (FileID  int,
					   FileSize bigint, StartOffset bigint,
					   FSeqNo      bigint, [Status]    bigint,
					   Parity      bigint, CreateLSN   numeric(38));
	 
CREATE TABLE #VLFCountResults(DatabaseName sysname, VLFCount int);
	 
EXEC sp_MSforeachdb N'Use [?]; 

				INSERT INTO #VLFInfo 
				EXEC sp_executesql N''DBCC LOGINFO([?])''; 
	 
				INSERT INTO #VLFCountResults 
				SELECT DB_NAME(), COUNT(*) 
				FROM #VLFInfo; 

				TRUNCATE TABLE #VLFInfo;'
	 
SELECT DatabaseName, VLFCount  
FROM #VLFCountResults
ORDER BY VLFCount DESC;
	 
DROP TABLE #VLFInfo;
DROP TABLE #VLFCountResults;
------

-- High VLF counts can affect write performance 
-- and they can make full database restores and crash recovery take much longer
-- Try to keep your VLF counts under 200 in most cases (depending on log file size)



-- Get CPU utilization by database (Query 24) (CPU Usage by Database)
WITH DB_CPU_Stats
AS
(SELECT pa.DatabaseID, DB_Name(pa.DatabaseID) AS [Database Name], SUM(qs.total_worker_time/1000) AS [CPU_Time_Ms]
 FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
 CROSS APPLY (SELECT CONVERT(int, value) AS [DatabaseID] 
              FROM sys.dm_exec_plan_attributes(qs.plan_handle)
              WHERE attribute = N'dbid') AS pa
 GROUP BY DatabaseID)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY [CPU_Time_Ms] DESC) AS [CPU Rank],
       [Database Name], [CPU_Time_Ms] AS [CPU Time (ms)], 
       CAST([CPU_Time_Ms] * 1.0 / SUM([CPU_Time_Ms]) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5, 2)) AS [CPU Percent]
FROM DB_CPU_Stats
WHERE DatabaseID <> 32767 -- ResourceDB
ORDER BY [CPU Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database is using the most CPU resources on the instance


-- Get I/O utilization by database (Query 25) (IO Usage By Database)
WITH Aggregate_IO_Statistics
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(SUM(num_of_bytes_read + num_of_bytes_written)/1048576 AS DECIMAL(12, 2)) AS io_in_mb
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(NULL, NULL) AS [DM_IO_STATS]
GROUP BY database_id)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY io_in_mb DESC) AS [I/O Rank], [Database Name], io_in_mb AS [Total I/O (MB)],
       CAST(io_in_mb/ SUM(io_in_mb) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [I/O Percent]
FROM Aggregate_IO_Statistics
ORDER BY [I/O Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Helps determine which database is using the most I/O resources on the instance


-- Get total buffer usage by database for current instance  (Query 26) (Total Buffer Usage by Database)
-- This make take some time to run on a busy instance
WITH AggregateBufferPoolUsage
AS
(SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name],
CAST(COUNT(*) * 8/1024.0 AS DECIMAL (10,2))  AS [CachedSize]
FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE database_id <> 32767 -- ResourceDB
GROUP BY DB_NAME(database_id))
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY CachedSize DESC) AS [Buffer Pool Rank], [Database Name], CachedSize AS [Cached Size (MB)],
       CAST(CachedSize / SUM(CachedSize) OVER() * 100.0 AS DECIMAL(5,2)) AS [Buffer Pool Percent]
FROM AggregateBufferPoolUsage
ORDER BY [Buffer Pool Rank] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Tells you how much memory (in the buffer pool) 
-- is being used by each database on the instance


-- Clear Wait Stats with this command
-- DBCC SQLPERF('sys.dm_os_wait_stats', CLEAR);

-- Isolate top waits for server instance since last restart or wait statistics clear (Query 27) (Top Waits)
WITH [Waits] 
AS (SELECT wait_type, wait_time_ms/ 1000.0 AS [WaitS],
          (wait_time_ms - signal_wait_time_ms) / 1000.0 AS [ResourceS],
           signal_wait_time_ms / 1000.0 AS [SignalS],
           waiting_tasks_count AS [WaitCount],
           100.0 *  wait_time_ms / SUM (wait_time_ms) OVER() AS [Percentage],
           ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY wait_time_ms DESC) AS [RowNum]
    FROM sys.dm_os_wait_stats WITH (NOLOCK)
    WHERE [wait_type] NOT IN (
        N'BROKER_EVENTHANDLER', N'BROKER_RECEIVE_WAITFOR', N'BROKER_TASK_STOP',
		N'BROKER_TO_FLUSH', N'BROKER_TRANSMITTER', N'CHECKPOINT_QUEUE',
        N'CHKPT', N'CLR_AUTO_EVENT', N'CLR_MANUAL_EVENT', N'CLR_SEMAPHORE',
        N'DBMIRROR_DBM_EVENT', N'DBMIRROR_EVENTS_QUEUE', N'DBMIRROR_WORKER_QUEUE',
		N'DBMIRRORING_CMD', N'DIRTY_PAGE_POLL', N'DISPATCHER_QUEUE_SEMAPHORE',
        N'EXECSYNC', N'FSAGENT', N'FT_IFTS_SCHEDULER_IDLE_WAIT', N'FT_IFTSHC_MUTEX',
        N'HADR_CLUSAPI_CALL', N'HADR_FILESTREAM_IOMGR_IOCOMPLETION', N'HADR_LOGCAPTURE_WAIT', 
		N'HADR_NOTIFICATION_DEQUEUE', N'HADR_TIMER_TASK', N'HADR_WORK_QUEUE',
        N'KSOURCE_WAKEUP', N'LAZYWRITER_SLEEP', N'LOGMGR_QUEUE', N'ONDEMAND_TASK_QUEUE',
        N'PWAIT_ALL_COMPONENTS_INITIALIZED', N'QDS_PERSIST_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP',
        N'QDS_CLEANUP_STALE_QUERIES_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP', N'REQUEST_FOR_DEADLOCK_SEARCH',
		N'RESOURCE_QUEUE', N'SERVER_IDLE_CHECK', N'SLEEP_BPOOL_FLUSH', N'SLEEP_DBSTARTUP',
		N'SLEEP_DCOMSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_MASTERDBREADY', N'SLEEP_MASTERMDREADY',
        N'SLEEP_MASTERUPGRADED', N'SLEEP_MSDBSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_SYSTEMTASK', N'SLEEP_TASK',
        N'SLEEP_TEMPDBSTARTUP', N'SNI_HTTP_ACCEPT', N'SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS_SLEEP',
		N'SQLTRACE_BUFFER_FLUSH', N'SQLTRACE_INCREMENTAL_FLUSH_SLEEP', N'SQLTRACE_WAIT_ENTRIES',
		N'WAIT_FOR_RESULTS', N'WAITFOR', N'WAITFOR_TASKSHUTDOWN', N'WAIT_XTP_HOST_WAIT',
		N'WAIT_XTP_OFFLINE_CKPT_NEW_LOG', N'WAIT_XTP_CKPT_CLOSE', N'XE_DISPATCHER_JOIN',
        N'XE_DISPATCHER_WAIT', N'XE_TIMER_EVENT')
    AND waiting_tasks_count > 0)
SELECT
    MAX (W1.wait_type) AS [WaitType],
	CAST (MAX (W1.Percentage) AS DECIMAL (5,2)) AS [Wait Percentage],
	CAST ((MAX (W1.WaitS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgWait_Sec],
    CAST ((MAX (W1.ResourceS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgRes_Sec],
    CAST ((MAX (W1.SignalS) / MAX (W1.WaitCount)) AS DECIMAL (16,4)) AS [AvgSig_Sec], 
    CAST (MAX (W1.WaitS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Wait_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.ResourceS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Resource_Sec],
    CAST (MAX (W1.SignalS) AS DECIMAL (16,2)) AS [Signal_Sec],
    MAX (W1.WaitCount) AS [Wait Count],
	CAST (N'https://www.sqlskills.com/help/waits/' + W1.wait_type AS XML) AS [Help/Info URL]
FROM Waits AS W1
INNER JOIN Waits AS W2
ON W2.RowNum <= W1.RowNum
GROUP BY W1.RowNum, W1.wait_type
HAVING SUM (W2.Percentage) - MAX (W1.Percentage) < 99 -- percentage threshold
OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Cumulative wait stats are not as useful on an idle instance that is not under load or performance pressure

-- SQL Server Wait Types Library (Paul Randal)
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/help/waits/

-- The SQL Server Wait Type Repository
-- http://blogs.msdn.com/b/psssql/archive/2009/11/03/the-sql-server-wait-type-repository.aspx

-- Wait statistics, or please tell me where it hurts
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/paul/wait-statistics-or-please-tell-me-where-it-hurts/

-- SQL Server 2005 Performance Tuning using the Waits and Queues
-- http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc966413.aspx

-- sys.dm_os_wait_stats (Transact-SQL)
-- http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms179984(v=sql.105).aspx




-- Signal Waits for instance  (Query 28) (Signal Waits)
SELECT CAST(100.0 * SUM(signal_wait_time_ms) / SUM (wait_time_ms) AS NUMERIC(20,2)) AS [% Signal (CPU) Waits],
CAST(100.0 * SUM(wait_time_ms - signal_wait_time_ms) / SUM (wait_time_ms) AS NUMERIC(20,2)) AS [% Resource Waits]
FROM sys.dm_os_wait_stats WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE wait_type NOT IN (
        N'BROKER_EVENTHANDLER', N'BROKER_RECEIVE_WAITFOR', N'BROKER_TASK_STOP',
		N'BROKER_TO_FLUSH', N'BROKER_TRANSMITTER', N'CHECKPOINT_QUEUE',
        N'CHKPT', N'CLR_AUTO_EVENT', N'CLR_MANUAL_EVENT', N'CLR_SEMAPHORE',
        N'DBMIRROR_DBM_EVENT', N'DBMIRROR_EVENTS_QUEUE', N'DBMIRROR_WORKER_QUEUE',
		N'DBMIRRORING_CMD', N'DIRTY_PAGE_POLL', N'DISPATCHER_QUEUE_SEMAPHORE',
        N'EXECSYNC', N'FSAGENT', N'FT_IFTS_SCHEDULER_IDLE_WAIT', N'FT_IFTSHC_MUTEX',
        N'HADR_CLUSAPI_CALL', N'HADR_FILESTREAM_IOMGR_IOCOMPLETION', N'HADR_LOGCAPTURE_WAIT', 
		N'HADR_NOTIFICATION_DEQUEUE', N'HADR_TIMER_TASK', N'HADR_WORK_QUEUE',
        N'KSOURCE_WAKEUP', N'LAZYWRITER_SLEEP', N'LOGMGR_QUEUE', N'ONDEMAND_TASK_QUEUE',
        N'PWAIT_ALL_COMPONENTS_INITIALIZED', N'QDS_PERSIST_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP',
        N'QDS_CLEANUP_STALE_QUERIES_TASK_MAIN_LOOP_SLEEP', N'REQUEST_FOR_DEADLOCK_SEARCH',
		N'RESOURCE_QUEUE', N'SERVER_IDLE_CHECK', N'SLEEP_BPOOL_FLUSH', N'SLEEP_DBSTARTUP',
		N'SLEEP_DCOMSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_MASTERDBREADY', N'SLEEP_MASTERMDREADY',
        N'SLEEP_MASTERUPGRADED', N'SLEEP_MSDBSTARTUP', N'SLEEP_SYSTEMTASK', N'SLEEP_TASK',
        N'SLEEP_TEMPDBSTARTUP', N'SNI_HTTP_ACCEPT', N'SP_SERVER_DIAGNOSTICS_SLEEP',
		N'SQLTRACE_BUFFER_FLUSH', N'SQLTRACE_INCREMENTAL_FLUSH_SLEEP', N'SQLTRACE_WAIT_ENTRIES',
		N'WAIT_FOR_RESULTS', N'WAITFOR', N'WAITFOR_TASKSHUTDOWN', N'WAIT_XTP_HOST_WAIT',
		N'WAIT_XTP_OFFLINE_CKPT_NEW_LOG', N'WAIT_XTP_CKPT_CLOSE', N'XE_DISPATCHER_JOIN',
        N'XE_DISPATCHER_WAIT', N'XE_TIMER_EVENT') OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Signal Waits above 10-15% is usually a confirming sign of CPU pressure
-- Cumulative wait stats are not as useful on an idle instance that is not under load or performance pressure
-- Resource waits are non-CPU related waits


--  Get logins that are connected and how many sessions they have (Query 29) (Connection Counts)
SELECT login_name, [program_name], COUNT(session_id) AS [session_count] 
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions WITH (NOLOCK)
GROUP BY login_name, [program_name]
ORDER BY COUNT(session_id) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This can help characterize your workload and
-- determine whether you are seeing a normal level of activity


-- Get a count of SQL connections by IP address (Query 30) (Connection Counts by IP Address)
SELECT ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name, 
COUNT(ec.session_id) AS [connection count] 
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions AS es WITH (NOLOCK) 
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_connections AS ec WITH (NOLOCK) 
ON es.session_id = ec.session_id 
GROUP BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name], es.[host_name], es.login_name  
ORDER BY ec.client_net_address, es.[program_name] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you figure where your database load is coming from
-- and verifies connectivity from other machines


-- Get Average Task Counts (run multiple times) (Query 31) (Avg Task Counts)
SELECT AVG(current_tasks_count) AS [Avg Task Count], 
AVG(runnable_tasks_count) AS [Avg Runnable Task Count],
AVG(pending_disk_io_count) AS [Avg Pending DiskIO Count]
FROM sys.dm_os_schedulers WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE scheduler_id < 255 OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Sustained values above 10 suggest further investigation in that area
-- High Avg Task Counts are often caused by blocking/deadlocking or other resource contention

-- Sustained values above 1 suggest further investigation in that area
-- High Avg Runnable Task Counts are a good sign of CPU pressure
-- High Avg Pending DiskIO Counts are a sign of disk pressure

-- How to Do Some Very Basic SQL Server Monitoring
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/glenn/how-to-do-some-very-basic-sql-server-monitoring/



-- Get CPU Utilization History for last 256 minutes (in one minute intervals)  (Query 32) (CPU Utilization History)
-- This version works with SQL Server 2008 R2
DECLARE @ts_now bigint = (SELECT cpu_ticks/(cpu_ticks/ms_ticks) FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info WITH (NOLOCK)); 

SELECT TOP(256) SQLProcessUtilization AS [SQL Server Process CPU Utilization], 
               SystemIdle AS [System Idle Process], 
               100 - SystemIdle - SQLProcessUtilization AS [Other Process CPU Utilization], 
               DATEADD(ms, -1 * (@ts_now - [timestamp]), GETDATE()) AS [Event Time] 
FROM ( 
	  SELECT record.value('(./Record/@id)[1]', 'int') AS record_id, 
			record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/SystemIdle)[1]', 'int') 
			AS [SystemIdle], 
			record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/ProcessUtilization)[1]', 
			'int') 
			AS [SQLProcessUtilization], [timestamp] 
	  FROM ( 
			SELECT [timestamp], CONVERT(xml, record) AS [record] 
			FROM sys.dm_os_ring_buffers WITH (NOLOCK)
			WHERE ring_buffer_type = N'RING_BUFFER_SCHEDULER_MONITOR' 
			AND record LIKE N'%<SystemHealth>%') AS x 
	  ) AS y 
ORDER BY record_id DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at the trend over the entire period. 
-- Also look at high sustained Other Process CPU Utilization values


-- Get top total worker time queries for entire instance (Query 33) (Top Worker Time Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], t.[text] AS [Query Text],  
qs.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time], qs.min_worker_time AS [Min Worker Time],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Worker Time], 
qs.max_worker_time AS [Max Worker Time], qs.execution_count AS [Execution Count], 
qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Elapsed Time], 
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Logical Reads], 
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [Avg Physical Reads], qs.creation_time AS [Creation Time]
, qp.query_plan AS [Query Plan] -- comment out this column if copying results to Excel
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t 
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(plan_handle) AS qp 
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------


-- Helps you find the most expensive queries from a CPU perspective across the entire instance



-- Good basic information about OS memory amounts and state  (Query 34) (System Memory)
SELECT total_physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Physical Memory (MB)], 
       available_physical_memory_kb/1024 AS [Available Memory (MB)], 
       total_page_file_kb/1024 AS [Total Page File (MB)], 
	   available_page_file_kb/1024 AS [Available Page File (MB)], 
	   system_cache_kb/1024 AS [System Cache (MB)],
       system_memory_state_desc AS [System Memory State]
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_memory WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You want to see "Available physical memory is high"
-- This indicates that you are not under external memory pressure


-- SQL Server Process Address space info  (Query 35) (Process Memory) 
-- (shows whether locked pages is enabled, among other things)
SELECT physical_memory_in_use_kb/1024 AS [SQL Server Memory Usage (MB)],
       large_page_allocations_kb, locked_page_allocations_kb, page_fault_count, 
	   memory_utilization_percentage, available_commit_limit_kb, 
	   process_physical_memory_low, process_virtual_memory_low
FROM sys.dm_os_process_memory WITH (NOLOCK) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- You want to see 0 for process_physical_memory_low
-- You want to see 0 for process_virtual_memory_low
-- This indicates that you are not under internal memory pressure


-- Page Life Expectancy (PLE) value for each NUMA node in current instance  (Query 36) (PLE by NUMA Node)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], RTRIM([object_name]) AS [Object Name], instance_name, cntr_value AS [Page Life Expectancy]
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N'%Buffer Node%' -- Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N'Page life expectancy' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- PLE is a good measurement of memory pressure.
-- Higher PLE is better. Watch the trend over time, not the absolute value.
-- This will only return one row for non-NUMA systems.

-- Page Life Expectancy isn�t what you think�
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/paul/page-life-expectancy-isnt-what-you-think/



-- Memory Grants Pending value for current instance  (Query 37) (Memory Grants Pending)
SELECT @@SERVERNAME AS [Server Name], RTRIM([object_name]) AS [Object Name], cntr_value AS [Memory Grants Pending]                                                                                                       
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE [object_name] LIKE N'%Memory Manager%' -- Handles named instances
AND counter_name = N'Memory Grants Pending' OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Memory Grants Pending above zero for a sustained period is a very strong indicator of memory pressure


-- Memory Clerk Usage for instance  (Query 38) (Memory Clerk Usage)
-- Look for high value for CACHESTORE_SQLCP (Ad-hoc query plans)
SELECT TOP(10) [type] AS [Memory Clerk Type], SUM(single_pages_kb)/1024 AS [SPA Memory Usage (MB)] 
FROM sys.dm_os_memory_clerks WITH (NOLOCK)
GROUP BY [type]  
ORDER BY SUM(single_pages_kb) DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- CACHESTORE_SQLCP  SQL Plans         
-- These are cached SQL statements or batches that aren't in stored procedures, functions and triggers
-- Watch out for high values for CACHESTORE_SQLCP

-- CACHESTORE_OBJCP  Object Plans      
-- These are compiled plans for stored procedures, functions and triggers



-- Find single-use, ad-hoc and prepared queries that are bloating the plan cache  (Query 39) (Ad hoc Queries)
SELECT TOP(50) DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) AS [Database Name], t.[text] AS [Query Text], 
cp.objtype AS [Object Type], cp.cacheobjtype AS [Cache Object Type],  
cp.size_in_bytes/1024 AS [Plan Size in KB]
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp WITH (NOLOCK)
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS t
WHERE cp.cacheobjtype = N'Compiled Plan' 
AND cp.objtype IN (N'Adhoc', N'Prepared') 
AND cp.usecounts = 1
ORDER BY cp.size_in_bytes DESC, DB_NAME(t.[dbid]) OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Gives you the text, type and size of single-use ad-hoc and prepared queries that waste space in the plan cache
-- Enabling 'optimize for ad hoc workloads' for the instance can help (SQL Server 2008 and above only)
-- Running DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE ('SQL Plans') periodically may be required to better control this.
-- Enabling forced parameterization for the database can help, but test first!

-- Plan cache, adhoc workloads and clearing the single-use plan cache bloat
-- https://www.sqlskills.com/blogs/kimberly/plan-cache-adhoc-workloads-and-clearing-the-single-use-plan-cache-bloat/



-- Database specific queries *****************************************************************

-- **** Please switch to a user database that you are interested in! *****
USE YourDatabaseName; -- make sure to change to an actual database on your instance, not the master system database
GO

-- Individual File Sizes and space available for current database  (Query 40) (File Sizes and Space)
SELECT f.name AS [File Name] , f.physical_name AS [Physical Name], 
CAST((f.size/128.0) AS DECIMAL(15,2)) AS [Total Size in MB],
CAST(f.size/128.0 - CAST(FILEPROPERTY(f.name, 'SpaceUsed') AS int)/128.0 AS DECIMAL(15,2)) 
AS [Available Space In MB], [file_id], fg.name AS [Filegroup Name]
FROM sys.database_files AS f WITH (NOLOCK) 
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.data_spaces AS fg WITH (NOLOCK) 
ON f.data_space_id = fg.data_space_id OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- Look at how large and how full the files are and where they are located
-- Make sure the transaction log is not full!!



-- I/O Statistics by file for the current database  (Query 41) (IO Stats By File)
SELECT DB_NAME(DB_ID()) AS [Database Name], df.name AS [Logical Name], vfs.[file_id], 
df.physical_name AS [Physical Name], vfs.num_of_reads, vfs.num_of_writes, vfs.io_stall_read_ms, vfs.io_stall_write_ms,
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_read_ms/(vfs.io_stall_read_ms + vfs.io_stall_write_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.io_stall_write_ms/(vfs.io_stall_write_ms + vfs.io_stall_read_ms) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [IO Stall Writes Pct],
(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS [Writes + Reads], 
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_read/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Read], 
CAST(vfs.num_of_bytes_written/1048576.0 AS DECIMAL(10, 2)) AS [MB Written],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_reads/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Reads Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_writes/(vfs.num_of_reads + vfs.num_of_writes) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [# Write Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_read/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Read Bytes Pct],
CAST(100. * vfs.num_of_bytes_written/(vfs.num_of_bytes_read + vfs.num_of_bytes_written) AS DECIMAL(10,1)) AS [Written Bytes Pct]
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(DB_ID(), NULL) AS vfs
INNER JOIN sys.database_files AS df WITH (NOLOCK)
ON vfs.[file_id]= df.[file_id] OPTION (RECOMPILE);
------

-- This helps you characterize your workload better from an I/O perspective for this database
-- It helps you determine whether you has an OLTP or DW/DSS type of workload



-- Top cached queries by Execution Count (SQL Server 2008 R2)  (Query 42) (Query Execution Counts)
-- SQL Server 2008 R2 SP1 and greater only
SELECT